Search
Last name:
First name:
Ennever & Enever family history & ancestry. Click here to return to the home page WJ Ennever (1869-1947). From the portrait by J Seymour R.A., exhibited in the Royal Academy.

Notes


Tree:  

Matches 1 to 250 of 9,491

      1 2 3 4 5 ... 38» Next»

 #   Notes   Linked to 
1  Family (spouse) F1555
 
2  Family (spouse) F67
 
3  STEAD, Martha (I33568)
 
4  STEAD, Richard (I33567)
 
5  GREEN, Lizzie Costello (I30378)
 
6 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. JAMES, William (I21121)
 
7  POWELL, Robert Newton (I18688)
 
8 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. MORGAN-HALLIDAY, Ryan William (I16124)
 
9 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. REED, Linda Maree (I15844)
 
10  ENEVER, Charles (I14868)
 
11 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. JONES, Joseph Norman (I11279)
 
12  JUSTICE, Thomas (I7509)
 
13  KNOTT, Peter Alan (I6993)
 
14 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. MELDRUM, Michael J (I7000)
 
15 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. ENNEVER, Ruth Dorothy (I6707)
 
16 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. MELDRUM, Roger Stanley (I6266)
 
17 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. BARSNESS, Joanne May (I3400)
 
18 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. BARSNESS, Joanne May (I3400)
 
19  ALLARS, William Henry (I5405)
 
20 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. HOGG, Anthony John (I2633)
 
21  HOBBS, Susannah (I1174)
 
22  ENEVER, William Joseph (I533)
 
23  ENNEVER, Emily (I368)
 
24  ENNEVER, Andrew Henry (I318)
 
25 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. BRIDGMAN, John (I9110)
 
26  CAMERON, Anne (I9949)
 
27  Family (spouse) F6019
 
28


Believed to be buried at Oxwick. 
TURNER, Susanna (I11623)
 
29

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Widow. 
FRANKLAND, Emily Jane (I11708)
 
30 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. WEHBY, Donald George (I9494)
 
31

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT

Sessions Paper.

TYLER, MAYOR.

SIXTH SESSION, HELD APRIL 2ND, 1894.

MINUTES OF EVIDENCE,

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY

JAMES DROVER BARNETT

AND

ALEXANDER BUCKLER,

Short-hand Writers to the Court,

ROLLS CHAMBERS, No. 89, CHANCERY LANE.

THE POINTS OF LAW AND PRACTICE

REVISED AND EDITED BY

EDWARD T. E. BESLEY, ESQ.,

OF THE MIDDLE TEMPLE, BARRISTER-AT-LAW.

LONDON:

STEVENS AND SONS, LIMITED, 119, CHANCERY LANE,

Law Booksellers and Publishers.
See original Click to see original

THE

WHOLE PROCEEDINGS

On the Queen's Commission of

OYER AND TERMINER AND GAOL DELIVERY

FOR

The City of London,

AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE

COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX AND THE PARTS OF THE COUNTIES OF ESSEX, KENT, AND SURREY, WITHIN THE JURISDICTION

OF THE

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT,

Held on Monday, April 2nd, 1894, and following days.

BEFORE the RIGHT HON. GEORGE ROBERT TYLER, LORD MAYOR of the City of London; the Hon. Sir WILLIAM RANN KENNEDY, Knt., one of the Justices of Her Majesty's High Court of Justice; Sir JOHN WHITTAKER ELLIS, Bart., and Sir JOSEPH SAVORY , Bart, M. P., Aldermen of the said City; Sir CHARLES HALL , Q.C., M.P., K.C.M.G., Recorder of the said City; Col. Sir WALTER WILKIN , Knt., Lieut.-Col. HORATIO DAVID DAVIES , Esq., FRANK GREEN , Esq., MARCUS SAMUEL , Esq., WALTER VAUGHAN MORGAN , Esq., and WILLIAM PURDIE TRELOAR, Esq., Aldermen of the said City; and Sir FORREST FULTON, Knt., Q.C., Common Serjeant of the said City; Her Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer and General Gaol Delivery, holden for the said City, and Judges of the Central Criminal Court.

JOHN VOCE MOORE, Esq., Alderman.

JOSEPH COCKFIELD DIMSDALE, Esq., Alderman.

Sheriffs.

THOMAS BEARD , Esq.

CLARENCE R. HALSE, Esq.

Under-Sheriffs.
See original Click to see original

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

TYLER, MAYOR. SIXTH SESSION.

A star (*) denotes that prisoners have been previously in custody—two stars (**) that they have been more than once in custody—a dagger (†) that they are known to be the associates of bad characters—the figures after the name in the indictment denote the prisoner's age.

LONDON AND MIDDLESEX CASES.

OLD COURT.—Monday, April 2nd, 1894.

Before Mr. Recorder.


Reference Number: t18940402-362

362. GEORGE ELLIOTT (30) , Robbery with violence, with Edward Gardner and other persons unknown, on Thomas Tadman, and stealing a watch, his property.
See original Click to see original

MR. SHERWOOD Prosecuted, and MR. PURCELL Defended.

THOMAS TADMAN . I am' an undertaker and jobmaster, of 422, Cable Street, Shad well—on August 29th, at 8.45 p.m., I was near the railway arch in Johnson Street, and saw five men—the prisoner was one of them—I have known him a long while, and have drank with him, and you tried Gardner and gave him five years; he wanted me to be bail for him—I had a gold lever watch, value £20, and a big Albert chain, and one of them, Gardner, said, "Give me this; if you don't, I will murder you"—I got knocked on my hands and knees by a man named Soldier, and kicked—I let go and they ran away—I called "Stop thief!" and when I got into the next street they knocked me down again, and the prisoner kicked me and broke my arm in two places—I halloaed "Stop thief"—I went to the London Hospital, and they told me I should have to have my arm taken off—I was an in-patient about a fortnight, and two portions of bone were removed—I cannot use my arm now; I cannot bend it—I continued an out-patient three months—there was a lamp—I have not seen my watch since—on October 5th, about ten a.m., my wife was driving me in the Mile End Road, and I saw the prisoner and said, "That is the man I want"—he went up one street and down another, and when he got to Jack's Hill, where a lot of bad characters live, he gave a parcel to someone and ran away, and I lost sight of him—I saw him again in the Commercial Road, and not again till I saw him at Dalston Station about six weeks ago with about twenty others, and I identified him—I said, "You know me, Joe"—he looked at me and said nothing.

Cross-examined. Mrs. Le Fevre was with me when I was robbed; I had been with her about a quarter of an hour—I never go to the George Public-house—I gave evidence against Gardner on November 15th—I never said, "I did not get to the George till ten minutes to nine. I did not go into the George; I am not a teetotaler. I had two-pennywort of whisky with Mrs. Le Fevre"—if I stated that, and it was taken down by the shorthand writer and printed in the Sessions Paper, it was a mistake—Gardner ran away into Thursby's arms—there was a witness who lives at Dr. Bernardo's who saw a man running—Mrs. Le Fevre is not here, nor is Henry James Thursby or Ann Newdrop—Johnson Street, where I was robbed, is a very lonely street, all private houses, and the only light was from the lamp—I should have had all the men that night if I could have got out of the hospital—I know Gardner's brother—I was asked to be bail for him, but I refused—that was at the Mansion House—it came here, and I saw Gardner in a public-house outside this Court—I did not mention when Gardner was tried that one of the men was George Elliott—that is not the prisoner's right name—his wife told me his right name—I saw her yesterday—when he was in custody I had told the police that I knew him by sight, and they placed him with nineteen strangers—I did not know anything about them—I am quite sure the prisoner is one of the men who robbed me—I am quite sure he kicked my arm and broke it in two places—when I was attacked I ran after my watch, and lost sight of Mrs. Le Fevre.

Re-examined. I was in the habit of seeing the men at a beershop, and that is where they spotted my watch—the Gardners were there, and
See original Click to see original

another one who has got fifteen months—I was in the habit of seeing Gardner—I buried his father-in-law.

By the COURT. Between August 9th and the time the prisoner was taken, excepting the time he ran away, I could never find him in any of the places where I used to see him; he left all those places.

WILLIAM KEMP (Policeman). I was present when Tadman identified the prisoner—he picked him out from ten or twelve others—he touched him and said, "That is the man."

The prisoner's statement before the Magistrate: "I can produce plenty of witnesses to prove where I was that night."

GUILTY . 
TADMAN, Thomas (I6452)
 
32

Forename
David

Burial date
05 / 02 / 1903

Location
Rippleside Cemetery

Register Number
4443

Age
52 Years

Funeral director

Grave detail
Grave reference
R/S / D / 1899 
ENEVER, David (I15497)
 
33

I understand that William Weidig adopted the surname Ennever shortly before the 1st World War, hence the child/ren have the surname of Ennever. 
ENNEVER, Rose Emma (I1218)
 
34

Mary Hubbard, a servant, is living with William Yallup & his wife Mary in 1881 and may be related to Julia. 
HUBBARD, Julia (I12008)
 
35
 
MURRAY, Kenneth George (I20791)
 
36
 
TANNER, Patricia Aileen (I20784)
 
37
 
ENNEVER, William Joseph (I135)
 
38
Age recorded as 73. 
BIRD, Mary (I20649)
 
39
Biography for
Mary Hay (I) More at IMDbPro »
ad feedback
Date of Birth
22 August 1901, Fort Bliss, Texas, USA

Date of Death
4 June 1957, Inverness, California, USA

Birth Name
Mary Hay Caldwell

Mini Biography

Mary Hay was born in Fort Bliss, Texas on August 22, 1901. She was a minor film actress whose career spans only four films. Her debut came in Hearts of the World (1918) in 1918 and her last was as Mary Lane in New Toys (1925) in 1925, a film she also produced. Mary died on June 4, 1957 in Inverness, California at the age of 55.
IMDb Mini Biography By: Denny Jackson

Spouse
Vivian Cullinan Bath (1906-1984) (1927 - ?) (divorced) 1 child
Richard Barthelmess (18 June 1920 - 1927) (divorced)
Richard Hastings (? - ?) (third)

Trivia

Appeared on the New York stage in 1925 in a dance act with Clifton Webb.

Former Ziegfeld Follies star.

Source: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0370524/bio 
Family (spouse) F9131
 
40
Birthdate recorded as 2/4/1880. 
PARDUCCIA, Charles (I2676)
 
41
Birthdate recorded as 31/10/1869. 
ENNEVER, John William (I168)
 
42
Birthdate recorded as Nov 1853, age 46. Recorded as having had 7 children, 5 surviving whereas 6 appear to have survived. 
KIRBY, Ellen Florence (I945)
 
43
Boarding with Thos Robbins & family 
GOYMER, Thomas Arthur (I27960)
 
44
First Name: Kenneth
Last Name: Ennever
Ethnicity: Gt Britian, African Bl.
Last Place of Residence: Preston, Cuba
Date of Arrival: May 30, 1920
Age at Arrival: 23y Gender: M Marital Status: S
Ship of Travel: Henry R. Mallory
Port of Departure: Antilla, Cuba
Manifest Line Number: 0001

Source: Ellis Island 
ENNEVER, Vivian Neville (I7701)
 
45
Former Commonwealth Bank of Australia
Other Name
Commonwealth Savings Bank
Other Name
Townsville City Council Library
Place ID
602471
Status
Permanent Entry
Address
272-278 Flinders Street
Town/Suburb
TOWNSVILLE
LGA
TOWNSVILLE CITY COUNCIL
Theme
Financing Australia
Significance
The former Commonwealth Bank is important in demonstrating the pattern of Queensland's history as the first purpose built Commonwealth Bank building in Townsville. The construction of this major 1923 building reflects the significant role Townsville, as the leading Australian country branch for over sixty years, played in the establishment and regional development of the Commonwealth Bank.

It is thought to be a rare surviving example in North Queensland of the commercial work of the Sydney architect and engineering consultant firm John & Herwald Kirkpatrick who were the first architects to work for the Commonwealth Bank of Australia. Apart from the Townsville office the Kirkpatrick firm designed the head office building in Sydney, the London and Melbourne buildings as well as a number of banks in other state capitals thus establishing a consistent architectural image for the Commonwealth Bank throughout Australia.

The Bank building is important because of its contribution to the overall historical townscape of the city but particularly to the east Flinders Street area where it is located within a group of buildings including the former Post Office (600911), Perc Tucker Gallery (600912) and the former Aplin Brown & Company building (600919).

The former Commonwealth Bank, built in 1923 using reinforced concrete, is one of the first multi storey buildings constructed in Townsville utilising this early twentieth century innovative technique. It is now a rare surviving example from the early period of use of this technology in Townsville

The former Commonwealth Bank, Townsville has a special association with the work of Sydney architect and consultant engineering firm John & Herwald Kirkpatrick and with Townsville architect Walter Hunt who was known for his innovative work in designing reinforced concrete buildings.
History
The former Commonwealth Bank of Australia building, the third premises but first purpose build Townsville Commonwealth Bank building, was constructed in 1923 at a cost of approximately £30,000. The building was designed by Sydney architect and consultant engineering firm John and Herwald Kirkpatrick and constructed by Townsville builders Charles Hanson and Sons under the supervision of Townsville architect Walter Hunt.

The federal government's Commonwealth Bank Act 1911 established Australia's first bank empowered to conduct both savings and general [trading] bank business with the security of a federal government guarantee. On 16 September 1912 the Commonwealth Government established the Commonwealth Bank of Australia. By 20 January 1913 the general business of the Bank had commenced in Canberra, in the six state capitals, in London and in Townsville. The Townsville office was the first country branch established in Australia.

Initially the Bank operated from leased premises opposite the future site of the new building. However, following the amalgamation the Commonwealth Bank with the Queensland Government Savings Bank (QGSB) on 7 December 1920 the Bank moved its operations into the leased premises of the former QGSB near the corner of Stanley and Flinders Street. The Commonwealth Bank then purchased this property. In 1922 the site was sold to the Queensland State Government Insurance Office (now the site of the 1928 Queensland State Government Building (601385)). It is not know how long the Bank stayed in this location but it is possible it remained until 1924 when the new building was completed.

In the meantime the Commonwealth Bank purchased an allotment for £5000 in Flinders Street adjacent to the Post Office (600911). This land was first issued as a Deed of Grant in November 1922 to the State Advances Corporation. Three months later, in February 1923, the land was sold to the Commonwealth Bank of Australia.

Sydney architect and consultant engineering firm John and Herwald Kirkpatrick, designers of a number of early Commonwealth Bank buildings including the head office in Sydney, the Melbourne, Canberra and London offices, were commissioned to draw up plans for a new building in Townsville. John Kirkpatrick, appointed architect for the Commonwealth Bank in 1912, was a friend of and cousin to the Governor of the Bank, Denison Samuel King Miller. The Kirkpatrick architectural firm remained architects for the Commonwealth Bank for at least ten years. During that time bank buildings were constructed throughout Australia, the Pacific and England.

This first purpose built Commonwealth Bank building in Townsville was constructed of reinforced concrete and brick. It is one of the earliest, if not the earliest surviving reinforced concrete multi storey building in Townsville. The supervising architect for the construction of the building, Walter Hunt, was an innovator in the use of reinforced concrete. At that time he was also designing the Dalgety & Company Building completed in Sturt Street, Townsville in December 1924

Townsville building firm Charles Hanson and Sons secured the tender to erect the new two storied brick and reinforced concrete Commonwealth Bank building. By August 1923 the first floor walls were almost completed and the floor beams were being filled in with concrete. The builders had installed an electric dynamo to facilitate the easier handling and hauling of mixed concrete to the first floor level.

In September 1923 the Queensland Architects and Builders Journal (A&B Journal) reported that the “first floor is laid and the columns to carry the flat roof are being filled. The framings of the beams of the first floor are now being removed and it is the contractors intention to commence plastering shortly”. The flat roof was made of concrete with a parapet wall.

Sub contractors Harvey & Clarke, who specialized in joinery and shopfitting, carried out the joinery work.

By February 1924 the A&B Journal reported that “…the Commonwealth Bank was housed in recently completed premises”. The building occupied a quarter acre block and accommodated the banking institution on the ground floor with the offices of the Deputy Public Curator on the first floor.

The ground floor entrance led to a vestibule, to the left of which was the manager's room. The building was comprised of a two storey high banking chamber, complete with tellers and a strong room. At the rear of the building were the resident officer's room, gentlemen's lavatory and cloakroom and a ladies lavatory. A flight of stairs in the vestibule led to an upstairs landing which accommodated a cleaner's room and additional male and female lavatories at the rear. The building was said to be well lit.

On 2 February 1924 the Townsville Evening Star reported on the “…near completion of the most attractive and up to date premises in the city…the building…is the architecture of Messers. John and Herwald G Kirkpatrick, architects and consultant engineers, Sydney”. The report said that the building was constructed on “…most modern lines, reinforced concrete being principally used, while many new features to the building trade of the North have been introduced”. These new features included ventilation and lighting, and ornate plaster work on the ceilings and substantial pillars in the banking chamber. A strong room was built behind the banking chamber. It was thought to be the largest in the north and was reinforced with steel railway rails. A Montgomerie Neilsen Oxidising nonseptic toilet system was installed with a large brick tank under the building. The special windows, which appear to be similar to those installed in the Sydney Head Office building, were special Simplex patented steel framed windows which adjusted to any angle. The building was electrically wired and had fans throughout and was constructed to allow the addition of two further floors. Thirty five massive concrete foundation pillars set up to 35 feet into the soil supported the structure. There was a clearance of six feet at the rear to about three feet on Flinders Street. The rear entrance was made secure with the installation of a “Chubb” door.

Although, in the February 1924 issue of the Architects and Builders Journal, it was reported that “…the Commonwealth Bank was housed in recently completed premises” the Commonwealth Bank Archives has written a brief history of the Townsville Branch saying the new building was opened on 14 July 1924. No reference has been supplied for the 14 July 1924 opening date. The February opening date makes this the first country branch to occupy its own, purpose built office. However, if the Townsville branch opened in July then the Newcastle Branch was the first branch to open on 5 May 1924.

During World War 11 the Commonwealth Bank, including the Townsville Branch, became heavily involved with Commonwealth War Bonds and other forms of government fund raising activities, as well as acting as local agents for the meat and clothes rationing authorities.

Despite the financial constraints of wartime the banking chamber was refurbished in 1944. However, in the mid 1950s the thirty year old premises needed further maintenance work. Dilapidated counters and fittings required replacement, lighting needed upgrading, painting of the interior was necessary and new coverings for the floors. Consideration was also given to constructing a third floor on the building to serve as bachelor quarters. However, the whole project was deferred until 1954 when tenders were called but deferred again because of cost. In 1957 new plans were drawn up for extensive alterations and additions, including a new Teller line, installation of fluorescent lighting, painting, linoleum tiles to walls and floor, new staff amenities and storage area, new entrance doors and removal of the portico over the front door.

The work was carried out by Brisbane builders N Kratzmann Pty Ltd at a cost of £54,283.15.2 and was completed in May 1959

During the late 1940s and 1950s the Commonwealth Bank expanded its activities Australia wide, opening hundreds of branches and agencies to cater for the increase and spread of population accompanying Australia's great post war migration influx, and reflecting the buoyant national economy of the 1950s. In December 1959 the Commonwealth Bank of Australia was restructured and renamed the Commonwealth Banking Corporation
To meet the needs of the expanding commercial centre and to overcome crowding in the branch building a sub-branch was opened at 471-473 Flinders Street in a twenty year old brick and concrete building. This sub branch became a full branch on 27 November 1967.

By 1967 staff numbers in the main bank in Flinders Street had reached 64. Existing facilities were inadequate with no storage space and no space for interview rooms. By 1969 plans for a new building were in place. A property 800 metres west along Flinders Street was purchased for £269,000. The new four storied building with a tower block of a further 14 floors was designed by Townsville architects Martin Dillon and Associates and constructed by Townsville builders JM Kelly (Builders) Pty Ltd in 1975. At the time of construction the Branch had reached 111 staff, making it “…the largest branch, apart from the capital cities…in Australia”. Operations transferred to the new premises on 10 October 1977.

The 1923 Commonwealth Bank property was subsequently exchanged for three blocks of vacant land owned by the Townsville City Council in Alfred Street, Aitkenvale where a branch of the bank was later built.

In 1978 the Townsville City Council established the Council Library in the former Commonwealth Bank building. The library continued to operate from the building until 2003 when it was moved next door into the Northtown Building.

The Townsville City Council sold the building to Aranda Park Pty Ltd in 1990 but continued to lease the property until the Library moved in 2003.
Description
The former Commonwealth Bank of Australia, Townsville is a two-storey reinforced concrete structure with reinforced concrete floors and flat roof with frontage to Flinders Street and also runs through to Ogden Street at the rear. The frontage was designed with five bays, the middle three projected slightly forward with four columns of a singular banded design flanking the three emphasised bays. These four columns have design similarity to columns of the bank's Sydney head office building though in render rather than stone. The columns have ovolo-moulded edges and the banding appears as strongly expressed recessed joints. A suggestion of art deco appears in the circular motif decoration below the top of the columns.

Windows to the building are steel framed, rectangular with the larger sashes casement and the upper sashes pivot hung. A plinth, originally plastered but now veneered in grey granite, to window sill height runs across the width of the building interrupted by two doorways. The main doorway into the former banking chamber is centrally located with a second doorway in the northern bay leading to the stairs for first floor access. The main doorway was originally flanked by two plain pilasters with entablature over that have been removed and the adjoining columns completed. The window frames either side of the main doorway incorporate an arched transom between the casements and smaller upper panes and sashes.

The two side bays of the frontage were finished as face brickwork panels initially but later were rendered over and painted. A classical cornice across the building at roof level projects forward over the three central bays and has pairs of dentils above the columns. Below the central cornice section there remains indications of the lettering of the bank signage incompletely chiselled off. Over the cornice is a panelled parapet forming a low simple pediment centrally with a tapered flagpole fixed behind.

Behind the street frontages the first floor of the building is set back from the northern boundary to gain natural light. The two-storeyed rear elevation to Ogden Street is plain and utilitarian without the decorative expression and composition of the front elevation. The rear and visible side walls are of painted render. Steel windows sizes vary according to use and plumbing is externally mounted. A single door, with roller shutter, allows access to the street.

Information about places in the Queensland Heritage Register is maintained by the Environmental Protection Agency under the Queensland Heritage Act 1992. Information available here is only part of the full Register entry and should not be taken as an official entry. Absence does not mean a particular place is not in the Register.

Certified copies of the full entries in the Register are available for a fee. You can also search the full Register for a fee to find out if a place or parcel of land is listed or otherwise affected by the Act.

Last updated: 08 Dec 2006

http://www.epa.qld.gov.au/projects/heritage/index.cgi?place=602471&back=1 
KIRKPATRICK, Herwald Gordon (I3131)
 
46
Former Commonwealth Bank of Australia
Other Name
Commonwealth Savings Bank
Other Name
Townsville City Council Library
Place ID
602471
Status
Permanent Entry
Address
272-278 Flinders Street
Town/Suburb
TOWNSVILLE
LGA
TOWNSVILLE CITY COUNCIL
Theme
Financing Australia
Significance
The former Commonwealth Bank is important in demonstrating the pattern of Queensland's history as the first purpose built Commonwealth Bank building in Townsville. The construction of this major 1923 building reflects the significant role Townsville, as the leading Australian country branch for over sixty years, played in the establishment and regional development of the Commonwealth Bank.

It is thought to be a rare surviving example in North Queensland of the commercial work of the Sydney architect and engineering consultant firm John & Herwald Kirkpatrick who were the first architects to work for the Commonwealth Bank of Australia. Apart from the Townsville office the Kirkpatrick firm designed the head office building in Sydney, the London and Melbourne buildings as well as a number of banks in other state capitals thus establishing a consistent architectural image for the Commonwealth Bank throughout Australia.

The Bank building is important because of its contribution to the overall historical townscape of the city but particularly to the east Flinders Street area where it is located within a group of buildings including the former Post Office (600911), Perc Tucker Gallery (600912) and the former Aplin Brown & Company building (600919).

The former Commonwealth Bank, built in 1923 using reinforced concrete, is one of the first multi storey buildings constructed in Townsville utilising this early twentieth century innovative technique. It is now a rare surviving example from the early period of use of this technology in Townsville

The former Commonwealth Bank, Townsville has a special association with the work of Sydney architect and consultant engineering firm John & Herwald Kirkpatrick and with Townsville architect Walter Hunt who was known for his innovative work in designing reinforced concrete buildings.
History
The former Commonwealth Bank of Australia building, the third premises but first purpose build Townsville Commonwealth Bank building, was constructed in 1923 at a cost of approximately £30,000. The building was designed by Sydney architect and consultant engineering firm John and Herwald Kirkpatrick and constructed by Townsville builders Charles Hanson and Sons under the supervision of Townsville architect Walter Hunt.

The federal government's Commonwealth Bank Act 1911 established Australia's first bank empowered to conduct both savings and general [trading] bank business with the security of a federal government guarantee. On 16 September 1912 the Commonwealth Government established the Commonwealth Bank of Australia. By 20 January 1913 the general business of the Bank had commenced in Canberra, in the six state capitals, in London and in Townsville. The Townsville office was the first country branch established in Australia.

Initially the Bank operated from leased premises opposite the future site of the new building. However, following the amalgamation the Commonwealth Bank with the Queensland Government Savings Bank (QGSB) on 7 December 1920 the Bank moved its operations into the leased premises of the former QGSB near the corner of Stanley and Flinders Street. The Commonwealth Bank then purchased this property. In 1922 the site was sold to the Queensland State Government Insurance Office (now the site of the 1928 Queensland State Government Building (601385)). It is not know how long the Bank stayed in this location but it is possible it remained until 1924 when the new building was completed.

In the meantime the Commonwealth Bank purchased an allotment for £5000 in Flinders Street adjacent to the Post Office (600911). This land was first issued as a Deed of Grant in November 1922 to the State Advances Corporation. Three months later, in February 1923, the land was sold to the Commonwealth Bank of Australia.

Sydney architect and consultant engineering firm John and Herwald Kirkpatrick, designers of a number of early Commonwealth Bank buildings including the head office in Sydney, the Melbourne, Canberra and London offices, were commissioned to draw up plans for a new building in Townsville. John Kirkpatrick, appointed architect for the Commonwealth Bank in 1912, was a friend of and cousin to the Governor of the Bank, Denison Samuel King Miller. The Kirkpatrick architectural firm remained architects for the Commonwealth Bank for at least ten years. During that time bank buildings were constructed throughout Australia, the Pacific and England.

This first purpose built Commonwealth Bank building in Townsville was constructed of reinforced concrete and brick. It is one of the earliest, if not the earliest surviving reinforced concrete multi storey building in Townsville. The supervising architect for the construction of the building, Walter Hunt, was an innovator in the use of reinforced concrete. At that time he was also designing the Dalgety & Company Building completed in Sturt Street, Townsville in December 1924

Townsville building firm Charles Hanson and Sons secured the tender to erect the new two storied brick and reinforced concrete Commonwealth Bank building. By August 1923 the first floor walls were almost completed and the floor beams were being filled in with concrete. The builders had installed an electric dynamo to facilitate the easier handling and hauling of mixed concrete to the first floor level.

In September 1923 the Queensland Architects and Builders Journal (A&B Journal) reported that the “first floor is laid and the columns to carry the flat roof are being filled. The framings of the beams of the first floor are now being removed and it is the contractors intention to commence plastering shortly”. The flat roof was made of concrete with a parapet wall.

Sub contractors Harvey & Clarke, who specialized in joinery and shopfitting, carried out the joinery work.

By February 1924 the A&B Journal reported that “…the Commonwealth Bank was housed in recently completed premises”. The building occupied a quarter acre block and accommodated the banking institution on the ground floor with the offices of the Deputy Public Curator on the first floor.

The ground floor entrance led to a vestibule, to the left of which was the manager's room. The building was comprised of a two storey high banking chamber, complete with tellers and a strong room. At the rear of the building were the resident officer's room, gentlemen's lavatory and cloakroom and a ladies lavatory. A flight of stairs in the vestibule led to an upstairs landing which accommodated a cleaner's room and additional male and female lavatories at the rear. The building was said to be well lit.

On 2 February 1924 the Townsville Evening Star reported on the “…near completion of the most attractive and up to date premises in the city…the building…is the architecture of Messers. John and Herwald G Kirkpatrick, architects and consultant engineers, Sydney”. The report said that the building was constructed on “…most modern lines, reinforced concrete being principally used, while many new features to the building trade of the North have been introduced”. These new features included ventilation and lighting, and ornate plaster work on the ceilings and substantial pillars in the banking chamber. A strong room was built behind the banking chamber. It was thought to be the largest in the north and was reinforced with steel railway rails. A Montgomerie Neilsen Oxidising nonseptic toilet system was installed with a large brick tank under the building. The special windows, which appear to be similar to those installed in the Sydney Head Office building, were special Simplex patented steel framed windows which adjusted to any angle. The building was electrically wired and had fans throughout and was constructed to allow the addition of two further floors. Thirty five massive concrete foundation pillars set up to 35 feet into the soil supported the structure. There was a clearance of six feet at the rear to about three feet on Flinders Street. The rear entrance was made secure with the installation of a “Chubb” door.

Although, in the February 1924 issue of the Architects and Builders Journal, it was reported that “…the Commonwealth Bank was housed in recently completed premises” the Commonwealth Bank Archives has written a brief history of the Townsville Branch saying the new building was opened on 14 July 1924. No reference has been supplied for the 14 July 1924 opening date. The February opening date makes this the first country branch to occupy its own, purpose built office. However, if the Townsville branch opened in July then the Newcastle Branch was the first branch to open on 5 May 1924.

During World War 11 the Commonwealth Bank, including the Townsville Branch, became heavily involved with Commonwealth War Bonds and other forms of government fund raising activities, as well as acting as local agents for the meat and clothes rationing authorities.

Despite the financial constraints of wartime the banking chamber was refurbished in 1944. However, in the mid 1950s the thirty year old premises needed further maintenance work. Dilapidated counters and fittings required replacement, lighting needed upgrading, painting of the interior was necessary and new coverings for the floors. Consideration was also given to constructing a third floor on the building to serve as bachelor quarters. However, the whole project was deferred until 1954 when tenders were called but deferred again because of cost. In 1957 new plans were drawn up for extensive alterations and additions, including a new Teller line, installation of fluorescent lighting, painting, linoleum tiles to walls and floor, new staff amenities and storage area, new entrance doors and removal of the portico over the front door.

The work was carried out by Brisbane builders N Kratzmann Pty Ltd at a cost of £54,283.15.2 and was completed in May 1959

During the late 1940s and 1950s the Commonwealth Bank expanded its activities Australia wide, opening hundreds of branches and agencies to cater for the increase and spread of population accompanying Australia's great post war migration influx, and reflecting the buoyant national economy of the 1950s. In December 1959 the Commonwealth Bank of Australia was restructured and renamed the Commonwealth Banking Corporation
To meet the needs of the expanding commercial centre and to overcome crowding in the branch building a sub-branch was opened at 471-473 Flinders Street in a twenty year old brick and concrete building. This sub branch became a full branch on 27 November 1967.

By 1967 staff numbers in the main bank in Flinders Street had reached 64. Existing facilities were inadequate with no storage space and no space for interview rooms. By 1969 plans for a new building were in place. A property 800 metres west along Flinders Street was purchased for £269,000. The new four storied building with a tower block of a further 14 floors was designed by Townsville architects Martin Dillon and Associates and constructed by Townsville builders JM Kelly (Builders) Pty Ltd in 1975. At the time of construction the Branch had reached 111 staff, making it “…the largest branch, apart from the capital cities…in Australia”. Operations transferred to the new premises on 10 October 1977.

The 1923 Commonwealth Bank property was subsequently exchanged for three blocks of vacant land owned by the Townsville City Council in Alfred Street, Aitkenvale where a branch of the bank was later built.

In 1978 the Townsville City Council established the Council Library in the former Commonwealth Bank building. The library continued to operate from the building until 2003 when it was moved next door into the Northtown Building.

The Townsville City Council sold the building to Aranda Park Pty Ltd in 1990 but continued to lease the property until the Library moved in 2003.
Description
The former Commonwealth Bank of Australia, Townsville is a two-storey reinforced concrete structure with reinforced concrete floors and flat roof with frontage to Flinders Street and also runs through to Ogden Street at the rear. The frontage was designed with five bays, the middle three projected slightly forward with four columns of a singular banded design flanking the three emphasised bays. These four columns have design similarity to columns of the bank's Sydney head office building though in render rather than stone. The columns have ovolo-moulded edges and the banding appears as strongly expressed recessed joints. A suggestion of art deco appears in the circular motif decoration below the top of the columns.

Windows to the building are steel framed, rectangular with the larger sashes casement and the upper sashes pivot hung. A plinth, originally plastered but now veneered in grey granite, to window sill height runs across the width of the building interrupted by two doorways. The main doorway into the former banking chamber is centrally located with a second doorway in the northern bay leading to the stairs for first floor access. The main doorway was originally flanked by two plain pilasters with entablature over that have been removed and the adjoining columns completed. The window frames either side of the main doorway incorporate an arched transom between the casements and smaller upper panes and sashes.

The two side bays of the frontage were finished as face brickwork panels initially but later were rendered over and painted. A classical cornice across the building at roof level projects forward over the three central bays and has pairs of dentils above the columns. Below the central cornice section there remains indications of the lettering of the bank signage incompletely chiselled off. Over the cornice is a panelled parapet forming a low simple pediment centrally with a tapered flagpole fixed behind.

Behind the street frontages the first floor of the building is set back from the northern boundary to gain natural light. The two-storeyed rear elevation to Ogden Street is plain and utilitarian without the decorative expression and composition of the front elevation. The rear and visible side walls are of painted render. Steel windows sizes vary according to use and plumbing is externally mounted. A single door, with roller shutter, allows access to the street.

Information about places in the Queensland Heritage Register is maintained by the Environmental Protection Agency under the Queensland Heritage Act 1992. Information available here is only part of the full Register entry and should not be taken as an official entry. Absence does not mean a particular place is not in the Register.

Certified copies of the full entries in the Register are available for a fee. You can also search the full Register for a fee to find out if a place or parcel of land is listed or otherwise affected by the Act.

Last updated: 08 Dec 2006
Source: http://www.epa.qld.gov.au/projects/heritage/index.cgi?place=602471&back=1 
KIRKPATRICK, John (I3128)
 
47
GORRILL, HERBERT EDWARD

Rank:
Private
Service No:
34143
Date of Death:
01/11/1918
Age:
19
Regiment/Service:
Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

1st/6th Bn.
Grave Reference
B. 9.
Cemetery
MAING COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION

Additional Information:

Son of Charles and Minnie Gorrill, of 143, Revelstoke Rd., Wimbledon Park, London.

Source: www.cwgc.org 
GORRILL, Herbert Edward (I18297)
 
48
House rented. 
LOSEE, Jesse H (I6988)
 
49
Jackson;Muriel Blomfield; ( 9 March 1901 - 1978 )
Daughter of A. Bloomfield , Muriel Jackson was born in London and educated at Ruskin House School, Hampstead. Painter and wood engraver of portraits and figure subjects, and mural decorator, she studied first at the Central School from 1917-22 under Noel Rooke for wood engraving and F. Ernest Jackson for tempera painting. From 1920 she specialized in recording gypsy caravans on Hampstead Heath, in 1948 presenting the Buckland Caravan to the London County Council.She was a finalist in the Prix de Rome in 1925 and in 1931 received the Logan Medal at the International Exhibition of Lithography and Wood Engraving, Art Institute of Chicago, for her print Wagon on the Heath. She exhibited at the NEAC, RA, with the Society of Wood Engravers (periodically at the Redfern Gallery, Associate Member 1925), as well as in the provinces and abroad.
Source: http://www.csm.arts.ac.uk/museum/


M B Jackson (also known by the name Muriel Blomfield Jackson), born 1901. Designed posters for London County Council Tramways 1922
Educated; Central School of Arts and Crafts;

Source: London Transport Museum 
JACKSON, Muriel Blomfield (I24829)
 
50
Kenneth E T Taylor & Ronald A W Taylor, both at school, were living with the family. Alec & Elsie Burton were next door at No. 9a. 
BURTON, Herbert (I17027)
 
51
Last of the 'lost lads'passes on
Published:Thursday| February 12, 2015
RichardMitchell, Staff Reporter
Seventy-sixyears ago, five Jamaica College (JC) students went missing in the forest of theBlue Mountains. The last surviving member, Don Soutar, passed away last monthat his home in Florida, United States.
His deathcompletes the story of the lost lads; an event which captured the nation'sattention in 1939, their return to civilisation a national celebration.
The boyswere Trevor 'Teddy' Hastings, John Ennever, Eric Gray, Douglas Hall and WilliamDonald 'Don' Soutar.
Soutar,born on April 14, 1920 and later became the managing director of Wills BatteryCompany, died at his home in Florida on January 24, 2015 at the age of 94.
TheSearch
Accordingto publications from The Gleaner, the events surounding the boys beganwhen the five left JC for an Easter weekend hike on April 5. They planned tohike to Port Antonio via the Blue Mountain Peak.
On April14, three days after the boys were scheduled to reach Port Antonio, familymembers journeyed to JC to report their concern to Reginald Murray, headmasterat the time.
On April 16,The Gleaner published the first of many news articles on the boys. Thefront page read 'Wide jungle search for five lost hikers'.
Thesearch for the boys came at a time in the country's history when mass media andnewspapers were synonymous because the country lacked any other methods of masscommunication.
"Therewas no local radio station at that time. And of course, no cellular phones, nowalkie-talkies, no CB radios, and no television station," reported HartleyNeita, a contributing journalist at The Gleaner.
Neitawent on to pen the novel The Search, which captures the eventssurrounding the five boys.
After 14days in the forest, on April 20 the five boys stumbled on a farm and the farmowner alerted the relevant persons. The boys were not missing, only lost.
On April21, one day after the lads were found, reports from The Gleaner told ofscenes of islandwide joy; church bells rang in their honour, and thanksgivingservices and other celebrations were held.
After theordeal, on April 20, 1939, Soutar told The Gleaner: "We are reallysorry to have caused so much anxiety to our people and to everyone in theisland. It had never been our intention to try anything foolhardy, but once inthe jungle, we could not turn back."
More than200 persons were involved in the search.
The OtherBoys
JohnEnnever was the youngest of the five. He was 15 years old during the time ofthe events and died of typhoid fever in 1946 at the age of 22. His brother,Vincent Harvey Ennever, later became headmaster at JC.
Teddy Hastingswas 17 when he and his friends went hiking in the Blue Mountains. He migratedto British Honduras, the country which is now known as Belize.
Eric Graybecame an executive of Jamaica Time Square in downtown Kingston, and died onOctober 10, 1998. He was 17 years old at the time of the hike.
DouglasHall passed away in November 1999, became a prominent professor of history atthe University of the West Indies and authored many books on history. He was 19when he and his friends took that eventful hike.
In 1939,future prime minister Michael Manley was a student at JC. David Coore, apolitician who helped to write Jamaica's Constitution, was also in attendanceat the school at that time.
richard.mitchell@gleanerjm.com 
ENNEVER, John Reginald (I7724)
 
52
Living with her grandmother. 
ENEFER, Charlotte (I27956)
 
53
Mary Ann Colgate and George and Rosa Whiffen living very close by but links not yet found. 
HARVEY, William Henry (I19809)
 
54
Name: Arthur Daniel Morris
Spouse Name: Hazel Victoria Chapman
Marriage Date: 1937
Marriage Place: New South Wales
Registration Place: Sydney, New South Wales
Registration Year: 1937
Registration Number: 17455 
Family (spouse) F7289
 
55
Name: Geo Edwin Enever
Birth Date: Abt 1889
Birth Place: Mitta Mitta, Victoria
Registration Year: 1889
Registration Place: Victoria, Australia
Father: Robt Archer Enever
Mother: Maria Emma Coleman
Registration Number: 20025x1904 
ENEVER, George Edwin (I15231)
 
56
Not proved. 
BROWN, Ann (I28496)
 
57 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. PUGH, Diane Valerie (I2510)
 
58 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. ENNEVER, James David (I4455)
 
59
O/W Mary 
PUNCHARD, May (I15712)
 
60
Published: 12:00AM BST 23 Jul 2001

TESSA WELBORN, who has died aged 72, was the designer responsible for the bikini worn by Ursula Andress in the film Dr No; she was also an actress and, in her later years, the owner of a private drinking club in the West End of London.

Tessa Prendergast, as she then was, set up her clothes design business with a partner in the late 1950s in her native Jamaica. Her most important commission came when the makers of Dr No invited her to design costumes for the Bond film, including what was to become the world's most celebrated bikini.

Miss Andress wore the ivory-coloured bathing costume, adorned with an army belt and commando knife, as she emerged from the sea on to a tropical beach. The outfit was sold earlier this year at Christie's to Robert Earl, owner of the Planet Hollywood restaurant chain, for £41,125.

Tessa Welborn was born Marie Therese Prendergast into a prosperous family in Jamaica on October 17 1928, although only half a dozen people were ever allowed to know her age. Her father, Louis Prendergast, was a plantation owner who died when she was in her infancy; her mother later married Noel Nethersole, who established the People's National Party with Norman Manley and became minister of finance.

After school in Kingston, Tessa Prendergast studied at New Rochelle University, New York, and at the Sorbonne in Paris. She lived for a time in Italy, and was briefly engaged to Prince Vittorio Massimo.

In the 1950s, Tessa Prendergast became an actress, landing the role of the Tahitian love interest opposite Burt Lancaster in His Majesty O'Keefe (1953). The deep sea cameraman was Scottie Welborn, whom she married.

But her acting career did not prosper, and she turned to designing clothes with a partner, Liz de Lisser. She later moved to London, and in the mid-1970s took over the Little House Club, in Shepherd Market, Mayfair. The house, built by Lord Shepherd in 1742, had been a private members' drinking club since 1928.

Tessa Welborn remained owner - and secretary - of the club until her death, living above a small bar which attracted members such as John Hurt, Sir Clive Sinclair, and Viscount Gormanston. She was to be found almost every night perched at the end of the bar, radiating glamour and absorbing - but never repeating - the gossip imparted to her by her habitues.

She drank only pink Champagne, except at breakfast, when she favoured a Bellini; any complaint that it was too early for alcohol was met with the reply: "Darling, it's cocktail hour somewhere in the world - I can't let them drink alone."

In 1988 Tessa Welborn helped to establish the Shepherd Market Association, which has so far raised £146,000 for charity. She had recently been involved in organising a performance of La Boheme to benefit Arthritis Care and the Mayur Earthquake Appeal.

Tessa Welborn's marriage to Scottie Welborn was dissolved in 1958; they had a daughter, who survives her. She married, secondly, William Davies, a businessman, who predeceased her.

Source www.telegraph.co.uk 
PRENDERGAST, Marie-Therese (I7755)
 
61
Recorded as married, Sidney not present. House rented at $55 pm. 
BOURDON, Beatrice Hestel (I33559)
 
62
Recorded as not born county (Middx). 
ENEVER, Robert (I147)
 
63
This will was proved at London the twenty ninth day of December in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and four before the worshipful George Ogilvie, Doctor and surrogate of the right honourable Sir William Wynne, knight also doctor of laws, master keeper or commissary of the prerogative court of Canterbury lawfully constituted by the Oaths of Ann Ennever, widow, the relic and John Aroroator the executors named in the said will to whom administration was granted of all and singular the goods, charges and credits of the said deceased having been first sworn duly to administer. 
UNKNOWN, Anne (I16695)
 
64
U.S. Naturalization Records - Original Documents, 1795-1972
about Eileen Mary Ennever
Name: Eileen Mary Ennever
State: Washington
Locality, Court: Seattle, District Court
Title: Naturalization Records of the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Washington, 1890-1957
Description: Naturalization index, 1912-1953. A-P
Series: M1542 
MASON, Eileen Mary (I6039)
 
65
U.S. Public Records Index 
ENNEVER, Clifford Wessel (I11673)
 
66 First World War Embarkation Roll
Charles Edward Augustus Enever
Number
15462
Rank
Private
Unit
Army Medical Corps - General Reinforcements (August 1915 - November 1918)
Ship Name
HMAT Boonah
Ship number
A36
Date of embarkation
21 October 1916
Place of embarkation
Brisbane

Army records show that at date of Embarkation - 21st October, 1916 - he was aged 21 years, Occupation: baker;
Next of Kin: Wife, Mrs M. A. Enever, 619 Leichhardt Street, Valley, Qld
Religion: Church of England 
ENEVER, Charles Edward Augustus (I15884)
 
67 John was born on 27th Nov. 1893 at Morongla Creek. John left the family farm for Sydney to make his fortune. He formed Sydney Gate and Fence Company and won the contract to make iron beds for the Australian Army during World War 2.
Prior to the war John was introduced through a mutual friend to Mavis Boggiss, they were married on 6th Oct. 1928 at Hurstville. They lived at Annandale where they had three children; Edward, Beryl and Yvonne.
Mavis had a hard time of it early, with Ted being born with a harelip and a cleft pallette. Mavis had to feed him with an eye dropper.
After the war John or Jack as he was known, sold Sydney Gate and formed another company, St. George Gate and Fence Co., they moved to Cambridge Street, Penshurst, where a fourth child Ian was born. Things were going well for the family, when on 13th June 1956 Ted was involved in a road accident. Ted died in hospital from his injuries.
Two years later Jack died of heart attack after suffering a stroke on 12th July 1958. 
FEENEY, John Henry (I9015)
 
68 Title: Joseph Enever, one of 224 convicts transported on the Waterloo, 02 October 1837.
Details: Sentence details: Convicted at Central Criminal Court for a term of life.
Vessel: Waterloo.
Date of Departure: 02 October 1837.
Place of Arrival: New South Wales.
Source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 90, Class and Piece Number HO11/11, Page Number 147 (75)
Author/Creator: Great Britain. Home Office. ; State Library of Queensland.
Subjects: Enever, Joseph ; Waterloo (Ship) ; Convicts -- Australia -- Registers ; Australia -- Genealogy
Publisher: Canberra A.C.T. : Australian Joint Copying Project
Is Part Of: Criminal : Convict transportation registers [HO 11]


State: New South Wales
Country: Australia
Arrival Date: 8 February 1838
Given Name: JOSEPH
Surname: Enever
Ship Name: WATERLOO

Also recorded as in Maitland in 1841 (Source: http://www.jenwilletts.com)
120040 Enever Joseph Waterloo 1838 1841 8 January Maitland GG
Labourer aged 31 from Essex. 5'10 
ENEVER, Joseph (I16176)
 
69 A Janetta Chalk nee Whittle was living at 28 St Dunstans Rd in 1901. FULCHER, Janette Louisa (I31595)
 
70 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. SOURBECK, Jean (I7635)
 
71 Buried Trinity Cemetery, Hewlett, Long Island, NY SOURBECK, George Robert (I7647)
 
72 c 1959
The same edition of the Gazette noted that West Malvern had acquired "an outstanding interesting example of modern architecture" in the shape of the new music school at St James's School.

"Designed by Mr N Seton Morris, the block is just above the old Westminster Arms Hotel, now also part of the school.

"It has pleasant, spacious hall for choral or orchestral work: above are ten sound-proof rooms in pleasant contemporary style, with wide windows opening put towards the Malverns or the Welsh hills, and with thermostatic heating."

The building was officially opened by an old girl of the school and noted musician, Miss Isobel Dunlop.

Source: http://www.malverngazette.co.uk/news/memorys/4198744.New_owners_pledge_to_renovate_ancient_well/ 
MORRIS, Noel Ennever Seton (I11078)
 
73 Living with her widowed mother & grandparents RAYSON, Harriet (I24735)
 
74 Living with his widowed mother & grandparents. RAYSON, Robert (I24736)
 
75 Mr. John James Grandi, formerly Mayor of Timaru, was born in Middlesex, England, in 1852. He was educated in London, and came to Lyttelton with his parents by the ship “British Empire” in 1864. In December of that year, he was apprenticed to a firm of coach-builders — Messrs Henry Wagstaff and Co., of Christchurch—and claims the distinction of being the first bound apprentice in Canterbury. After completing his indentures, he was for about twelve months with Messrs. Cobb and Co., and subsequently with Messrs. Barrett, Hudson and Moore, in whose service he continued for seven years. Coming to Timaru in 1879 under engagement to Mr. John Barrett, coachbuilder, he remained till that gentleman's retirement in 1890, when Mr. Grandi purchased the business. He was for many years a member of the Borough Council, and was elected mayor in 1896. He was a member of the Hospital and Charitable Aid Board, High School Board, and Licensing Committee, and has been provincial master in the Manchester Unity of Oddfellows. Mr. Grandi is married, and has ten children.

Source: http://www.nzetc.org/ 
GRANDY, John James (I10407)
 
76 Name: BRAIN, EDWARD
Initials: E
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Private
Regiment/Service: Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment)
Unit Text: 7th Bn.
Age: 29
Date of Death: 09/05/1917
Service No: 24829
Additional information: Son of Walter Brain, of Hartpury, Gloucester; husband of Fanny Maria Brain, of 158, Melbourne St., Gloucester.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: IX. H. 10.
Cemetery: WARLINCOURT HALTE BRITISH CEMETERY, SAULTY

Source: CWGC
 
BRAIN, Edward (I6251)
 
77 Name: HELMORE, HENRY VICTOR THOMAS
Initials: H V T
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Flying Officer
Regiment/Service: Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Unit Text: 12 Sqdn.
Age: 24
Date of Death: 27/06/1941
Service No: 82724
Additional information: Son of Sydney Martyn Helmore and Ellen Francis Helmore, of Southend-on-Sea, Essex; husband of Hilda Helmore.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 30.
Memorial: RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL

Courtesy CWGC 
HELMORE, Henry Victor Thomas (I5592)
 
78 Recorded as 32. Mary Ann Stanbridge, niece, is living with the family. ANQUETIL, Robert Francis (I20349)
 
79 Recorded as married. ENEVER, Henry (I16766)
 
80 SS# 118-12-0388 CHAMBERLAIN, Harold (I7621)
 
81 THE HISTORY OF A & C TADMAN FUNERAL DIRECTORS

Tadman Funeral Directors was originally conceived from the love of horses of the great-great-grandfather of one of the current directors of the company, Tim Tadman.

Wag Tadman was a horse trader working from his home in Bale in Norfolk. He imported Friesian horses from Belgium, trained them to pull a glass hearse and then sold them to the Funeral Trade, mainly in the London Area. He, and his wife Dorcas, moved to Stepney, East London in 1849, and slowly built a thriving funeral business. After their deaths, their son Alfred William and his wife Annie continued to run the business successfully. He became a well known personality in the East End of London, not only as a Funeral Director, but also for his knowledge of Belgian Black Horses, which are the breed still used for the Horse Drawn Funerals.

After Alfred William's death in 1935, his widow Annie and sons Alf and Con, added to the reputation of the family business and when Alf died in1980, Con went into partnership with his son Gordon. Towards the latter part of the 1990's, Gordon's wife Maureen and son Tim took the reins. Gordon sadly passed away in 2006.

A new branch was opened in Bethnal Green in 1998 and now the branch in Kings Langley has been added to the family business. This branch is the venture of Tim Tadman, who lives locally and plays for Kings Langley Cricket Club,To maintain the family connection, the Kings Langley branch is managed by Marian Stavrou, Tim's mother-in-law, who has lived and worked in the area for over 30 years.

This Independent and Family Owned Funeral Directors offers a Personal and Professional service in the traditional manner to the local community and surrounding villages and towns. This includes specialist Horse Drawn Carriage Funerals, Saab limousines, a 24-hour service, Private Chapels of Rest, Repatriation to any Country and any Denominations included.

A Wedding Carriage Service is also available with a genuine Landau or Limousines.

We have recently become first call for TV programmes Eastenders and Londons Burning, Bad Girls, Holby City, Silent Witness, Trial & Retribution & Spooks.

If you would like any further information please telephone 01923 264296 and we will ensure complete Funeral Arrangements carried out with dignity.

Source: www.actadman.co.uk 
TADMAN, Thomas (I6452)
 
82 "...and an elegant semi-cottage instrument, by Ennever and Steedman, in walnut marqueterie, with a peculiar keyboard: mother-of-pearl being substituted for ivory on the white keys, and tortoiseshell for ebony on the black ones." ENNEVER, William Joseph (I129)
 
83 "Admitted as a Lunatic & subsequently discharged quite well". ENNEVER, Frederic (I102)
 
84 "Australia Births and Baptisms, 1792-1981," database, FamilySearch(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XTZJ-5XT : accessed 12 May 2016), Phyllis Augusta Bligh Suttor, 29 Feb 1888; citing ; FHL microfilm 992,679. SUTTOR, Phyllis Augusta Bligh (I3054)
 
85 "Firebrick" is unclear. WILLIS, Frances Shepherd (I3590)
 
86 "Husband in America". Same annotation for Hannah Jackson who is sharing the same house. HUTCHINSON, Ann Eliza (I9848)
 
87 "Invalid" is scribed through although this is assumed to be an enumerator's tick mark. HUTCHINSON, Joseph (I9681)
 
88 'Boarding' with John Roast & Lucy Ann. ENEVER, William (I15488)
 
89 'but out of work' deleted and 'General' inserted. BARNARD, Alfred (I16489)
 
90 'Dundalk Barracks Married Soldiers Quarters'. (1) 'N o 1': block plan of the quarters. Reference table. Scale: 1 inch to 20 feet. Compass indicator. Inset: relative sketch; scale: 1 inch to 88 feet. (2) 'N o 1': plans, elevation and section of the quarters. Scales: plans and elevation: 1 inch to 10 feet; section: 1 inch to 5 feet. Compass indicator. (3) 'N o 3': plans, sections and elevations of the wash house. Scales: plans and elevations: 1 inch to 10 feet; sections: 1 inch to 5 feet. Inset: sectional detail of roof; scale: 1 inch to 2 feet. (4) 'N o 4': plans and sections of the water tank and the granite curb and iron door. Scales: tank: 1 inch to 5 feet; curb and door: 1 inch to 1 foot. By John Burgoyne, Clerk of Works RE, 20-30 November 1867. Signed N Ferguson, Clerk of Works; Lieutenant J Matheson, RE; Lieutenant Colonel [?H Mundy, RE]; Colonel George Wynne, Commanding RE in Ireland, Dublin, 3 February 1868. Annotated: Numbers 10.166/1-4 respectively.

Source: National Archives 
BURGOYNE, John (I19729)
 
91 'Great escape' war hero dies, aged 89

THE funeral will take place on Monday of Nottingham-born Harry Enever – a veteran of the real Great Escape.
Mr Enever, who died last week at the age of 89, was one of the last survivors of the mass breakout in March 1944 from Stalag Luft III prisoner-of-war camp near Sagan, a Polish town 100k south of Berlin.
The events were dramatised in the film The Great Escape, which starred Steve McQueen.
Mr Enever was sent to Stalag Luft III after his Halifax bomber was shot down during a raid over Duisburg. He entered a camp where the Germans had decided to cage the most determined escapees under one roof. They included Squadron Leader Roger Bushell, a South African-born pilot with a fierce determination to escape, having twice tried and been recaptured.
He had a pathological hatred of the Gestapo, having witnessed its brutal treatment of prisoners.
Despite having a death sentence over his head if he tried to escape again, Bushell had a plan for a mass break-out of 250 men which would cause chaos for the Germans and strike a massive propaganda blow for the Allies.
Mr Enever became part of Bushell's scheme involved the construction of three tunnels, nicknamed Tom, Dick and Harry, hidden beneath barrack huts and a washroom.
Although the tunneling was carried out by a small team of diggers, hundreds of other prisoners were involved in the elaborate scheme.
Mr Enever was a "stooge", monitoring the movements of the guards and, by a system of signals, passing on the information to the diggers.
Harry Enever was given a number in the 80s and took his place in the queue of more than 220 prisoners waiting to get out of the escape tunnel – ironically named Harry.
However, because the tunnel exit was dug yards short of the trees that would have hidden the fleeing men, only 76 had made it to the safety of the forest before it was discovered.
Of those 76 who got out, 50 were executed, including Bushell. For the rest left behind in Stalag Luft III, there would be no more escapes.
Mr Enever remained in the camp for the rest of the war, before returning to his home in The Meadows, much to the relief of his family, including surviving sister Audrey Coleman, who lives in Netherfield.
Born into a mining family in Clayton Street, the Enevers were not well-off but Harry was bright enough to win a scholarship to Mundella Grammar School and, at 16, began work in the City Treasurer's office.
His career flourished. He rose up the local government ladder, becoming a council chief executive in Cornwall before he retired.
The funeral is being held at Bournemouth Crematorium.
Mr Enever leaves a widow, Joyce, and one sister.

Nottingham Post 4/8/2011 
ENEVER, Harry (I19632)
 
92 'Lady Tichborne' includes a recital of a song 'Good Luck to Sir Roger'. ENEVER, Rosina Ann (I16769)
 
93 'Lodging' with his mother and step-father. BUDREY, Isaac (I19883)
 
94 'Navvy'. CHALLIS, Nathaniel (I19304)
 
95 'Out of work' deleted. BARNARD, David Daniel (I16506)
 
96 'Out of Work' struck through. HILLS, Benjamin (I14099)
 
97 'Party for Red Cross
Sunshine and Moonlight was thename chosen for a party organised by the Rose Bay younger set for the Red CrossSociety and held at Schofield House, Point Piper yesterday afternoon andevening.  During the afternoon the guestsplayed tennis and enjoyed swimming and speedboat rides and afterwards during analfresco camp-fire supper were entertained with gipsy music.  They danced the Lambeth Walk on the lawnwhich was encircled with Chinese lanterns. Committee members present included Misses Sheila Partridge (president),Jean Potter (vice-president), Bon Harris (honorary secretary), Mavis Harris(honorary assistant secretary), Heather Treloar (honorary treasurer), Eudora Woollard,Zena Schmeers, Norma Freeman, Betty Schumaker and winkle Ross.  Others present included Mr and Mrs JohnBarton, Mrs N Schellitzchek, Misses Gwen Murray, Zara Symons, Betty Allen, LyleHackett, June Whitcombe, Marjorie Kirkpatrick, and Messrs Tom Treloar, LionelNix, Leslie Jones, Ross Copp, Bill Allen, Tom Maher and Bill Coleman.
Miss Mavis Harris (FM6215) inarranging a dance to be held at Lapstone Hotel on Thursday and a Palm Beachdance will be held at Retias?, Drumalbyn Road, Bellevue Hill on Saturdaynight.'
Miss Mavis Harris would becomeHerwald’s second wife.  Herwald was stillmarried to Oriel until 1940 but on their divorce decree, the reason fordissolution was adultery.  It could alsobe that Herwald met Mavis while she was organising the dance at the Lapstone. 
KIRKPATRICK, Marjorie (I18027)
 
98 'Party for Red Cross
“Sunshine and Moonlight was thename chosen for a party organised by the Rose Bay younger set for the Red CrossSociety and held at Schofield House, Point Piper yesterday afternoon andevening.  During the afternoon the guestsplayed tennis and enjoyed swimming and speedboat rides and afterwards during analfresco camp-fire supper were entertained with gipsy music.  They danced the Lambeth Walk on the lawnwhich was encircled with Chinese lanterns. Committee members present included Misses Sheila Partridge (president),Jean Potter (vice-president), Bon Harris (honorary secretary), Mavis Harris(honorary assistant secretary), Heather Treloar (honorary treasurer), Eudora Woollard,Zena Schmeers, Norma Freeman, Betty Schumaker and winkle Ross.  Others present included Mr and Mrs JohnBarton, Mrs N Schellitzchek, Misses Gwen Murray, Zara Symons, Betty Allen, LyleHackett, June Whitcombe, Marjorie Kirkpatrick, and Messrs Tom Treloar, LionelNix, Leslie Jones, Ross Copp, Bill Allen, Tom Maher and Bill Coleman.
Miss Mavis Harris (FM6215) inarranging a dance to be held at Lapstone Hotel on Thursday and a Palm Beachdance will be held at Retias?, Drumalbyn Road, Bellevue Hill on Saturdaynight.'
Miss Mavis Harris would becomeHerwald’s second wife.  Herwald was stillmarried to Oriel until 1940 but on their divorce decree, the reason fordissolution was adultery.  It could alsobe that Herwald met Mavis while she was organising the dance at the Lapstone. 
HARRIS, Mavis Merle (I6387)
 
99 'Roomer' POWELL, Robert Basil (I18392)
 
100 'Scholar' appears to have been deleted. ENEVER, George (I16346)
 
101 'Single woman'. ENEVER, Jane (I15483)
 
102 'The Tichborne Claimant' p45/46. TICHBORNE, Mary Agnes Teresa (I19480)
 
103 'The Tichborne Claimant' p47 BRYANT, Annie (I19587)
 
104 'Visiting' her sister, Ethel. HUDSON, Lily Eliza (I23802)
 
105 'With Objectives in Mind' Publ: 1972 ENNEVER, Leonard Frederick (I563)
 
106 (b. Jamaica, 10 Dec. 1924; d. 6 March 1997 Jamaican; Prime Minister 1972 – 80, 1989 – 92 The son of Norman Manley, the founder of the People's National Party (PNP) and a "father" of Jamaican independence, Michael Manley entered a political dynasty, becoming leader of the PNP in 1969. He had previously studied economics at the LSE and worked for the BBC in London, organized Jamaican sugar workers in a PNP-run trade union, and been elected to parliament in 1969.

He led the PNP to victory in the 1972 election and two years later declared himself a democratic socialist, proposing a radical agenda of nationalizations, social reforms, and close ties with Cuba. He introduced legislation on union and women's rights, started a land reform, and spent heavily on health, education, and housing. The PNP was re-elected in 1976 but its second term was characterized by economic crisis and mounting political violence. Manley alleged that the USA and IMF, hostile to his brand of socialism and Third Worldism, destabilized the Jamaican economy, cutting credit, and imposing covert sanctions. The PNP lost the 1980 election to the conservative Jamaica Labour Party (JLP) of Edward Seaga.

After nine years in opposition, Manley returned to power in 1989, inheriting an even more bankrupt economy. By now he had recanted much of his earlier radicalism, made peace with Washington, and broken with the left-wing faction of the PNP. His government presented itself as pro-business and advocated privatization policies, although maintaining cautious links with Cuba.

In 1992 Manley retired from the premiership on grounds of ill-health, handing over power to P. J. Patterson. He has subsequently worked as a consultant and has contributed to various regional commissions and organizations.

Michael Manley (1924-1997) was the leader of the People's National Party of Jamaica, prime minister (1972-1980, 1989-1992), and theoretician for a new International Economic Order. A fiery leftist and critic of the United States in his first two terms, in his third term he was a moderate with close ties to America.

Michael Norman Manley was born in St. Andrew, Jamaica, on December 10, 1924, the second son of illustrious parents. His father, Norman Washington Manley, was a Rhodes scholar, decorated World War I hero, and the most distinguished legal advocate in the history of Jamaica. In 1938 Norman Manley founded the People's National Party, and he served as premier of Jamaica between 1955 and 1962. Along with his cousin, Alexander Bustamante, the elder Manley was a dominant force in the political system of his c}ountry until his retirement in 1969. Michael Manley's mother, Edna (nee Swithenbank), was an internationally recognized sculptor and patron of the arts

Manley attended Jamaica College, his father's alma mater, in suburban Saint Andrew parish and in the early 1940s was a writer for the weekly newspaper Public Opinion. He volunteered for service in the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1943 while at McGill University and at the end of the war studied politics, philosophy, and economics at the London School of Economics. Upon graduation he worked as a freelance journalist with the British Broadcasting Service from 1950 to December 1951, when he accepted the invitation to be associate editor of Public Opinion.

Jamaica in the early 1950s was an exciting place politically. The People's National Party had lost the general elections of 1949 although they gained the largest number of popular votes. More significantly, an irreparable rift had developed between the party and its labor union, culminating in a break in 1952. Manley became a member of the executive committee of the People's National Party in 1952 and helped organize the National Worker's Union, the successor to the Trade's Union Congress dominated by the expelled dissident faction

In 1953 Manley quit Public Opinion to work full time with the National Worker's Union. He is credited with the rapid expansion of the union not only among sugar workers, the traditional stronghold of the rival Bustamante Industrial Trades Union, but also among elite bauxite and mine workers, as well as urban industrial workers. In 1955 he was elected Island supervisor and first vice president of the National Workers Union, and in 1962, the year he was appointed a senator, he was elected president of the Caribbean Bauxite and Mineworkers Union. Before his formal entry into politics Manley had the reputation of being the foremost union organizer in the Caribbean - an energetic, fearless, dynamic, and gifted leader.

In the general elections of 1967 Manley won the seat in the House of Representatives for the constituency of Central Kingston, later reclassified as East Central Kingston. Elected leader of the People's National Party in 1969 after the resignation of his father, Manley led the party to victory in 1972.

Manley's Stormy Years in Office

Manley's first two terms as prime minister created great controversy and projected his country into international headlines. In an effort to implement his brand of "democratic socialism" he sought to drastically restructure the politics and economy of Jamaica through far-reaching legislation. On the positive side, over 40,000 new housing units were built, free education was made available for all students, new hospitals were established and the infant mortality rate was cut in half. However, the Jamaican economy took a nosedive due to several factors. The price of oil increased nearly ten-fold during Manley's term; the government's purchase of most of the sugar estates resulted in them becoming unproductive white elephants; and many business and professional people, fearing Manley's leftist rhetoric, left the country. As a result, unemployment skyrocketed to thirty percent by 1980.

In the international sphere, Manley developed closer ties between Jamaica and Fidel Castro's Cuba, and criticized America and other western countries. He sought to lead the Movement of Non-Aligned Nations into the formation of a New International Economic Order against what he considered the exploitation of the West.

Manley won reelection easily in 1976, but shortly afterwards the island's increasing economic problems forced him to turn to the International Monetary Fund (IMF). To obtain loans, the prime minister agreed to reduce the value of his country's currency. Unfortunately, this failed to help the economy, while meeting the conditions of the loans hurt the living standards of Jamaicans. By March of 1988, Manley refused to accept the conditions of the IMF for new loans.

As the economy continued to sour, violence broke out between Manley's supporters and his opponents, driving away visitors and eliminating a major source of revenue from tourism. The 1980 elections were held in an atmosphere of near-civil war, with over 750 dying and thousands being injured in the shootings and stabbings that broke out over the country. In November's elections, Manley and the People's National Party were routed by Ed Seaga and his Jamaican Labor Party, managing to retain only nine out of 60 seats in Parliament.

Manley Returns to Power

Just after his defeat, Manley expressed no regrets about his policies, saying "We lost because we challenged the power of the Western economic order. And for that I am unrepentant," quoted in "Seaga Knocks Out the Left," by John Brecher, Newsweek. He also indicated his desire to return to private life. The latter was shortlived, and a new Manley - more moderate than he had been previously - became leader of the opposition. Manley's decision not to contest the December 1983 elections cost him his seat in Parliament, but he continued to be highly-regarded by the Jamaican people. Seaga - never particularly popular - became even more unpopular with his austerity program, and in February of 1989 Manley and the People's National Party won a decisive victory, capturing 44 seats in Parliament. In an interview with Newsweek's Eric Calonius, Manley acknowledged making mistakes in his previous tenure, and said, "The country has evolved, the world has evolved, and we must evolve with it. I think I have evolved."

In his third term as Prime Minister, Manley followed many of Seaga's policies, although he tended to put greater emphasis on small-scale businesses and increased spending on education. Also, like Seaga, he forged a close relationship with the United States, even supporting President George Bush's proposed North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) to reduce tariffs between the United States, Mexico, and Canada. In 1990 Manley was diagnosed with cancer, and on March 16th he announced he was stepping down, for reasons of health, from his position as prime minister. In spite of his illness, he led the Commonwealth Observer Mission to oversee the historic 1994 elections in South Africa, which ended apartheid in that country.

Manley died of prostate cancer March 7th, 1997, in Kingston after having served his country in one form or another for over 40 years. In a letter to the Jamaican Prime Minister, Secretary General of the Commonwealth Emeka Anyaoku called Manley "a statesman of courage and conviction who extended his vision of a better and more just society beyond his island shores" who was "endeared not only to his Commonwealth colleagues but to people so many parts of the world."

Manley's life boasted many personal and political accomplishments. He was prime minister for three terms and lead the People's National Party for almost a quarter-century. Manley also founded the International Bauxite Association and spearheaded the International Seabed Authority, which both have their headquarters in Kingston, and served as vice-president of the Socialist International for Latin America and the Caribbean in 1978. He also received many awards, including a United Nations special award for his contributions to the struggle against apartheid (1978), the Joliot Curie Medal of the World Peace Council (1979), the Order of the Liberator from Venezuela (1973) and the Order of the Mexican Eagle (1975).

Further Reading

Manley is listed in the International Who's Who and Personalities Caribbean; His political career can be gleaned from his writings as well as from Rex Nettleford, Identity, Race and Protest in Jamaica (1971); Carl Stone, Electoral Behaviour and Public Opinion in Jamaica (1974); Manley's tenure as prime minister from 1972-1980 and the 1980 elections were given an overview in "Political Storm Over Jamaica," by Jo Thomas, New York Times Magazine; and the 1980 election results were given in "Seaga Knocks Out the Left," by John Brecher, Newsweek, November 10th, 1980; Interviews with Manley shortly after his 1989 victory are given to Erik Calonius in "A Comeback in Jamaica," Newsweek, February 20th, 1989; and with Hans Massaquoi of Ebony, February, 1990; Manley authored five books: The Politics of Change (1974), A Voice at the Workplace (1976), The Search for Solutions (1977), Jamaica: Struggle in the Periphery (1982), and Up the Down Esculator: Development and the International Economy (Washington, D.C., Howard University Press, 1987). Two biographies of him are Michael Manley: The Making of a Leader by Darrell Levi (Athens, University of Georgia Press, 1990); and Michael Manley: The Great Transformation by David Panton (Kingston Pub. Ltd., 1993).

Source: www.answers.com 
MANLEY, Michael Norman (I7861)
 
107 (Sinerdow} Family (spouse) F6493
 
108 (to Father) HARROLD, Elizabeth (I1027)
 
109 (to her aunt, Ann Turner) ENEVER, Emma (I16711)
 
110 (to husband) ELSON, Ann Elizabeth (I1032)
 
111 (Transcribed as Evever} Family (spouse) F11061
 
112 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. DE BORST, Olaf Charles (I7967)
 
113 HUMPHREY, George (I25944)
 
114 MARTIN, William Henry (I13391)
 
115 .Grave 4028 Old Ground PRATT, Thomas (I3057)
 
116 0 weeks work in previous year.
Richard Jones, nephew, aged 20 is living with the family. 
JONES, Wes (I29423)
 
117 0 weeks work in previous year. JONES, Joe (I29425)
 
118 06/12/1915 Enlisted at St Pauls Churchyard for 'Short Service' 7th Royal Fusiliers Regiment No. 9730
20/11/1916 Telegraph to Smith 86 Cheddington Rd Edmonton. 2nd General Hospital Havre reports 9730 Pte RB Smith 7th Royal Fusiliers gunshot wounds right arm dangerously ill regrret permission to visit cannot be granted
Undated letter from No 2 General Hospital BG7 France to Mrs Smith. Your son admitted to the above hospital suffering from GSW R forearm. He is extremely ill & it wll be sometime before he is able to travel. Signed Helen G Doyle Sister.
21/11/1916 Telegraph from 2nd General Hospital Havre Condition satisfactory.
22/11/1916 2nd General Hospital Havre Condition satisfactory.
23/11/1916 Telegraph to Smith c/o Pastor Hodgskins Newdigate Surrey. Havre telegram says Rays improvement very satisfactory Hatfiled
25/11/1916 Memorandum to Mr C Smith 86 Chaddington (sic) Rd Edmonton informs that 9730 Pte RB Smith on 24 Nov off the dangerously ill list.
27/11/1916 Letter from No.2 General Hospital giving news of Ray's condition and asking his father to enquire about Dick (Parsons 24 Moravean Street Bethnal Green)
17/06/1917 Discharged from Edmonton Military Hospital with orders to proceed to his home 86 Cheddington Road Upper Edmonton and there to await further instructions as to his discharge from the Service.
18/06/1917 Discharged in consequence of being no longer physically fit for War Service under para 392 (XVI) KR after serving 1 years 195 days with the Colours. G.S.W (gun shot wound) rt. forearm.
19-21/6/1917 Awarded pension of 14/- per week
13/11/1917 Ministry of Pensions continues pension at Thirteen shillings and ninepence a week from 19-12-17 to 20-5-1919 
SMITH, Raymond Basil (I30)
 
119 1 child recorded as living. Age recorded as 55. FLYNN, Susan C (I29746)
 
120 1 day old. BARNARD, Lily Rosina (I16508)
 
121 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. ENEVER, Robin P (I18137)
 
122 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. IVES, Elinor M (I18143)
 
123 1. Father recorded as Henry Ennever, occupation as Carver. Mary Ennever is recorded as "formerly Thomas".
2. Mary Stothart was an Ennever by birth and there is no record of a marriage to a Henry Ennever.
3. The husband of her aunt (Sarah Jane Thomas) with whom she lived in 1861 and 1871 was a Henry Collins who was a Wood or Cabinet Carver.
4. Mary Stothart is recorded as unmarried in the 1861 and 1871 censuses. 
ENNEVER, Robert Edgar (I1303)
 
124 1. Father recorded as Henry Ennever, occupation as Wood Carver.
2. Mary Stothart was an Ennever by birth and there is no record of a marriage to a Henry Ennever.
3. The husband of her aunt (Sarah Jane Thomas) with whom she lived in 1861 and 1871 was a Henry Collins who was a Wood or Cabinet Carver.
4. Mary Stothart is recorded as unmarried in the 1861 and 1871 censuses. 
ENNEVER, Alice Amelia (I1302)
 
125 1. Father recorded as Henry Ennever, occupation as Wood Carver. Mary Ennever is recorded as "formerly Thomas".
2. Mary Stothart was an Ennever by birth and there is no record of a marriage to a Henry Ennever.
3. The husband of her aunt (Sarah Jane Thomas) with whom she lived in 1861 and 1871 was a Henry Collins who was a Wood or Cabinet Carver.
4. Mary Stothart is recorded as unmarried in the 1861 and 1871 censuses. 
ENNEVER, Arthur William (I2303)
 
126 1. Father recorded as Henry Ennever, occupation as Woodcarver. Mary Ennever is recorded as "formerly Thomas".
2. Mary Stothart was an Ennever by birth and there is no record of a marriage to a Henry Ennever.
3. The husband of her aunt (Sarah Jane Thomas) with whom she lived in 1861 and 1871 was a Henry Collins who was a Wood or Cabinet Carver.
4. Mary Stothart is recorded as unmarried in the 1861 and 1871 censuses. 
ENNEVER, George Alfred (I2305)
 
127 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. ENNEVER, Roy Stanley (I5472)
 
128 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. ANDERSON, Hortenzia Dellorita (I5474)
 
129 1.2.1.1.3.4.1.5.5 Lynn Spencer, son of Spencer Adams (Horace Gideon, Gideon, John, John, John, John, Robert) and Julia Adaline (Older) Pease; b. Feb 15, 1860 in Oxford, WI; d. Apr 19, 1935 in Milwaukee, WI; m. Jun 28, 1887 in Madison, WI, Emma Ennever Nunns; b. Jun 09, 1865 in Port Jefferson, NY; d. Jun 15,1939 in Wauwatosa, WI; bur. in Forest Home cemetery, Wauwatosa, WI. She was the daughter of Henry and Mary (Ennever) Nunns. Emma Ennever Nunns received her Bachelor of Letters from the Regents of the University of Wisconsin at Madison, Wisconsin on the 23rd of Jun 1886. Emma was in the same graduating class as her future husband, Lynn Spencer Pease.
Obituary - The Milwaukee Journal Saturday April 20, 1935
Lynn S. Pease, 75, attorney and educator commonly credited with being the founder of the Marquette university law school, died Friday at the Milwaukee hospital. He was president of the Clum Manufacturing Co. here. Mr. Pease was born in Oxford, Wis., descended from colonial stock and a member of the seventh generation of his family to be born on American soil. His father, Spencer A. Pease, held an important place in Wisconsin affairs as a lawyer, a physician, a journalist and a legislator. After attending school in Montello, Wis., Lynn Pease served as principal of the graded school in that village before entering the University of Wisconsin. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree from the university in 1886 and returned to Montello to become principal of the high school and to work on the Montello Express, a paper that his father owned. In 1889 he went back to the university to enter the law school, where he was graduated in 1891 Opinion Won Fame While a student he was active in literary and forensic organizations. Members of the state bar association and of the judiciary recall the famous "moot court" at the university at which Mr. Pease presided when a question of law regarding the right of state treasurers to keep interest on state funds in their possession, was argued. The opinion written by Mr. Pease was published in a number of legal journals and was accepted by the law school as his graduating thesis. After graduation Mr. Pease became superintendent of the state school for the blind at Janesville, Wis., remaining there until 1895, when he was appointed lecturer at the University of Wisconsin. He came to Milwaukee in 1896 to practice law here. Soon afterward he was employed to investigate conditions at the industrial school for boys at Waukesha.
Although there was considerable clamor over his appointment, since he was a Democrat and the state administration was Republican, his investigation was credited with making education rather than punishment the dominant feature of the institution.
Law School Lecturer
A lecturer at the Milwaukee Law school, Mr. Pease had an active part in the change that made that school the college of law at Marquette University in 1907. He was a member of Psi Upsilon, Social fraternity; of Phi Delta Phi, legal fraternity; of the Milwaukee bar and the Wisconsin bar association; of the Milwaukee Press club and the Milwaukee athletic club, and of Masonic bodies here. For some time he was president of the University of Wisconsin Alumni association.
Children of Lynn Spencer and Emma Ennever (Nunns) Pease, 1 born in Montello, WI, 2 born in Madison, WI, 3 in Janesville, WI:

1.2.1.1.3.4.1.5.5.1 Spencer Adams b. Jun 17, 1888 d. Sep 10, 1956 Wauwatosa, WI
1.2.1.1.3.4.1.5.5.2 Mary Ennever b. Sep 17, 1893 d. Feb 1982 Milwaukee, WI
1.2.1.1.3.4.1.5.5.3 Frederick Jackson b. Sep 17, 1893 d. Apr 26, 1974 Milwaukee, WI
1.2.1.1.3.4.1.5.5.4 Harlow Heath b. Sep 06, 1897 d. Jan 18, 1982 W. Allis, WI

Rick in Taunton, MA

Source: http://boards.ancestry.com/surnames.pease/1199.1/mb.ashx 
PEASE, Lynn Spencer (I3557)
 
130 1/2 past 7 ocl a.m. GRANDY, Oriano (I2847)
 
131 10/9/1834 also recorded as her birthdate (IGI). HUTCHINSON, Rachael (I3472)
 
132 1044. ANN TILLIDUFF was indicted for stealing 3 half-sovereigns, the monies of Daniel Cloves, her master.
DANIEL CLOVES. I live at Oliver's terrace, East Bromley. The prisoner was in my service two years and a half, as under-housemaid—on the 5th of April I missed three half-sovereigns from my dressing-table—I called my sister who fetched the prisoner form the room above—I sent for a policeman, and said I would have her searched—she said, she hoped the policeman would not search her, she had no objection to my two sisters searching her—after they had retired, my sister called out, that she had found one half-sovereign.
Cross-examined by Mr. DOANE Q. Was this money loose in your dressing-room? A. Yes—I had occasion to leave my room for two minutes, and, on my return, these had been abstracted—I had twenty nine half sovereigns loose on the dressing-table—I am quite certain three were missing—I had counted them, in consequence of losing money on the Wednesday previous.
MARY CARTER . I am sister of Mr. Cloves. I went up stairs and found the prisoner in my room—she asked me to search her, instead of the police-man—I
See original 
went with her into the next room—in taking off her dress, she was a long while in taking one hand out of the sleeve, and she kept her hand closed—I said, "Ann, you have something in your hand"—she changed it into the other hand, and brought that hand forward—I said, "Put both hands forward"—something fell from her—I said, "That is the half-sovereign"—she said, "No, it is the sixpence which I told you I had"—she had previously said, she only had sixpence—I picked it up, and it was a half-sovereign—I went with her into the drawing-room, and saw the policeman take two more half-sovereigns from her hair at the back of her head.
HENRY MILSTEE (police-constable K 208.) I found two half-sovereigns in the prisoner's hair behind—she had a cap on over it—she said nothing.
GUILTY . Aged 30


1045. ANN TILLIDUFF was again indicted for stealing 1 watch, value 7l., and 2 seals, 1l.; the goods of Daniel Cloves, her master.
DANIEL CLOVES . I directed the policeman to search the prisoner's room, and he produced this watch and two seals—I recognized the seals immediately, as my property—I do not recognize the watch from its outward appearance—I missed a hunting-watch, with the name of Haley and Percival, London, in it—it had had a fall—the dial-plate was broken—it would not go, and I had put it in a drawer twelve months ago.
Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. This is a lady's watch? A. Yes—my watch had two gold cases—this has one—mine had a white face—I do not know the number of my watch—I am certain of the seals.
JAMES HOLMES , watchmaker, Domingo-street, St. Luke's. I fancy I have some recollection of this watch was brought to me by the prisoner's brother—it had then two gold cases—it was very much bruised and dilapidated, as if it was not good for much, very much injured from service—I put a new case to it, and a new dial—I charged 3l. for it, with the old gold cases—I took no account of the maker's name—I cannot swear positively that this is the watch.
MR. CLOVES re-examined. The seals are gold, I know nothing of the ring—the seals were not on it when I lost it.
HENRY MILSTEE (policeman.) I found the watch in a drawer, which the prisoner said was hers.
Cross-examined. Q. Was it locked? A. No.
GUILTY of stealing the Seals. Aged 30.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor.— Confined One Year 
TILLIDUFF, Ann Lydia (I30180)
 
133 10m old. COLE, John Alfred (I20280)
 
134 11 Mar 1968, pg 29

Death Notice

ENEVER, Elizabeth -- At Toronto on Sunday, March 10, 1968. Elizabeth Enever, late of
703 Jane St., wife of the late Percy Enever. Dear mother of George, Constance (Mrs J.R.
Dicks), Herbert and Violet (Mrs R.C. Mundier). Resting at the funeral Chapel of Wm.
Speers, 2926 Dundas St. W., (near Keele). Service Wednesday afternoon at 1 o'clock.
Internment Prospect Cemetery. 
MORGAN, Elizabeth (I15351)
 
135 11690/1910  ENEVER, Jean Mavis (I33759)
 
136 119/10/1798RANALDSONHENRIETTAGEORGE LAWSON/FRMR4-49FEDINBURGHEDINBURGH CITY CITY/MIDLOTHIAN685/01 0520 0000No Image Family (spouse) F1105
 
137 12 days old. Birth registration not found & census illegible. It is possible this is Alice but she is recorded as only 9 in 1881 and although the 1871 census is illegible it does not look like 'Alice'. RIGGLESFORD, unknown (I24904)
 
138 1202441 THOMAS, Horace (I25659)
 
139 1225. JOSEPH ENEVER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March, at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, 1 mare, price 25l., the property of Francis Henry Beall; and JOHN LEE , for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.
MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the Prosecution.
THOMAS WARNER . I am a farmer, and live at Alborough hatch, near Ilford, Essex. A mare belonging to Mr. Beall, was brought to me, about the 22nd of November—I saw it last on the 16th of March, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, and directed it to be driven into Epping Forest—George Hale had charge of it on the forest—I have seen Mr. Beall several times since—he has not paid me for the keep of the horse—I have not yet delivered him any bill—his servant it here—I saw the mare again on the 7th of April, in custody of the police—is was the same mare that was taken away on the 16th of March—I had received it from Devonish—it had a very particular head and countenance.
Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. How long prior to the 16th of March was she turned out on the forest? A. It was turned out that morning, and had been there about a fortnight, but was brought home at night.
FRANCIS HENRY BEALL . I have a bay mare, which I sent to Mr. Warner, the first week in December, or last week in November—it has a remarkable forehead and face, what I call rather a sour countenance—I saw her again on the 8th of April, at Brick-lane station-house—I am quite certain it was the same mare—she was in a wretched condition then—when in condition, she was worth full 30l.—there was a scar made on her forehead, which was not there when I sent her—I think it had been produced with caustic—it had not destroyed the cuticle, but had taken off the hair.
GEORGE HALE . I am eleven years old. I was in Mr. Warner's employ in March last—I took the mare to Epping Forest—she had not been there above three or four hours, when a man came and took her away—I told him it was not his mare, but he never made me any answer—he put a halter on her, and was very quick—he jumped on her back and rode her away—he had no saddle—I had no one to help me—I went home and told master—I should know the man again—I am quite sure the prisoner Enever is the man—I had seen him before—I did not know his name, but I knew him by sight—I had seen him on the Forest—I saw the mare again at the station-house—I had her in my care some time.
Cross-examined. Q. You were looking after the horse? A. Yes, it was along with our colts—there was no other horse there—I am quite certain of the prisoner—it was between three and four o'clock in the afternoon
See original 
—I cannot state the time nearer than that—he had on a kind of blue coat, like he has on now—I saw the boy King when I went back to my master's, and I told him.
THOMAS DEVONISH I am servant to Mr. Beall. I have groomed the mare for two years—I took it to Mr. Warner's—I have seen her since at the station-house—there was a great deal of difference in her there, but I have not the least doubt of her being master's—she was very plain and awkward about her head, and had a very sour countenance—she had a very particular mark on her near hind leg, in her fetlock joint—a white and black mark.
JOHN DOUGLAS . I am a policeman. About twelve o'clock at night, on the 18th of March, I was on duty in Lamb's-gardens, Bethnal-green—the prisoner Lee is a housekeeper there—I do not know what he is—a woman of the town was making a noise in front of his house, and he gave charge of her—she was taken to the station-house by two other police-men—she complained of ill usage from him—he had refused to admit her, and she broke his window—she said to him, "If you serve me out, I will serve you out; go and bring that stolen horse out of your stable, at the back of your house"—I had refused before that to take her, unless he went to give charge of her—he then said he would go and press the charge at the station-house—when they proceeded a little way, I left them with two others, and turned back—I knocked at the door of Lee's house, and Enever opened the door—I said, "Oh, Enever, I am surprised to see you here; I did not expect to see you here"—he said, "Why?"—I said the officers were after him a few days before, I heard, in a case of felony, and I said, "What is this about the horse?"—he made no answer to that—I said, "Let us see him?"—he took the light off the table, and opened a door at the back of the room which led into a stable—I there saw a bay mare—I asked him who it belonged to—"Oh," he said, "It is Lee's mare, which his brother lent him to work with"—I examined the mare particularly, so that I might look over the list of stolen horses in the "Hue and Cry," and then went to the station-house—I overtook the woman before they got there, but Lee was gone—after the woman was charged, I went back again to Lee's house, and knocked at the door—nobody opened it—I remained there about twenty minutes—I then went round to the back of the house, where the stable is—looked through a little window in the stable, and the mare was gone—I have seen her since, but she was in different condition to what she was then—when I saw her in the stable, she looked as if she had not been groomed for some time, but I am certain it is the same one I have seen since.
Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you know of the prisoners being brought to the police-office? A. I did not—I first heard of it nine or ten days ago—I think they had then been finally committed—I did not go to the office to give evidence—Enever was called by the name of Joe—Lee gave the woman in charge for breaking his window—I did not know him living there before.
MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Who was in the house besides Lee? A. Two females.
COURT. Q. Why not take Enever into custody at first, when you knew the police were after him? A. That was only hearsay.
MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know of any reward being offered about the horse? A. I heard of it about nine days ago—I gave this information before that—directly I heard they were taken, Power, the
See original 
policeman, told me they were in custody—I told him what had happened—that was before I heard of the reward—I had given information before that to different constables, but not to Power—I do not know whether the prisoners were committed at that time.
MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. When did you give information of what you had observed about the mare? A. Immediately—I informed the inspector on duty—at the time I saw Power, the prisoners had been in custody some time, and the horse was found—I do not expect any of the reward.
THOMAS CUMMING . I am a policeman. In consequence of information, on the 4th of April I went to a chandler's shop in Weymouth-terrace, Hackney-road, and went from there to a stable, where I found a mare—I did not Hake her away at first—I watched there, and at half-past three o'clock in the afternoon I heard a noise in the stable—Power and Clements went into the stable, and I went in at another door—I saw the prisoner Lee there—power said, "You are my prisoner, on suspicion of stealing this mare"—he said, "(I did not steal the mare, it belongs to my master"—I took the mare out of the stable, and the constable took Lee—I asked who his master was—he said, "I don't know him, he is a tall man"—I asked where he lived—he said he did not know—I said, it was very strange he Should have a master, and not know where he lived—he said, "I don't Know"—I took the mare to the station-house, and put it into Leach's stable in Brick-lane—I and some other constables went about half-past four o'clock to Lamb's-buildings, and took Enever within about 200 yards from there, coming down a court—I said "You are my prisoner"—he said, "What for?'—I said, "For stealing that mare you have got"—he said, "I know no mare, I have got no mare"—I took him to the station-house, searched him, and found a small padlock-key on him—I tried it to the lock we took off the stable-door in Weymouth-street, and it locked and unlocked it—when he heard us say that it did so, he said it belonged to his lodging, and he said, "I have no mare"—he said Power knew how he got his living.
Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was Power present at the time you had the conversation with Lee? A. He was—I did not hear Lee say he was in company with his master when the stable was taken for the mare—he might have said so to Power, and I not hear it.
DENNIS POWER . I am a policeman. I went to the stable in Weymouth-terrace, on the 4th of April, with Cumming—after watching some time, I saw Lee there—he was about to supply the horse with food—the account Cumming has given of the conversation with Lee, is correct—I was the first that entered the stable—I told Lee he was my prisoner, on suspicion. of stealing, the mare—he then stated, that he got a pot of beer and 1s. a week occasionally, from his master, for looking after this mare—I asked him, was he in company with his master at the time he took the stable—the said he was on the first occasion—I told him not to say any thing to criminate himself—I received some information from Douglas—the reward was offered immediately after the horse was stolen—we had got the mare and the parties were committed to Newgate before I saw Douglas.
EDWARD CLEMENTS . I am a policeman. I was present with Cumming and Power at the stable, in Weymouth-terrace—I have heard their evidence, and agree with it—this padlock came from the stable, and this key, found on Enever, locked and unlocked it.
ALEXINA FLETCHER . 1 am the wife of Ephraim Fletcher, and live at the corner of Weymouth-terrace. The stable the horse was found in belongs
See original 
to my husband—both the prisoners came to hire it, on the 20th of March between twelve and one o'clock—my husband was not there then—Lee asked me what the rent was—Enever told me they wanted to put a hone in, which they must take in from grass—in about twenty minutes Enever came alone, and asked me if my husband had come in—I said no, he would be in between one and two o'clock—nothing more passed—he came again between one and two o'clock, and made a bargain with my husband for the stable—I have often seen Enever—he was generally dressed in a jacket and sleeves—on one occasion I saw him in a blue body coat, and I think boots.
Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. At the last meeting did he not, say the horse had been out to grass, and the reason he took it from grass was, that the man wanted the land for arable land? A. Yes—I do not think I was ever asked before whether Lee asked me about the rent—I think I have said before that he did—I am certain it was Lee.
EPHRAIM FLETCHER . The stable belongs to me—I and Enever were in the stable—he said he wished to see me, to make the bargain that there should be no dispute about the rent afterwards—we came to an agreement—he was to pay 2s. a week, and he paid me 1s. deposit—I did not see Lee myself, till about Easter Monday, the 27th of March—Lee fed the horse, and Enever swept the stable up.
Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you not let it to Enever? A. Yes—it is a close stable—he paid me the 1s. deposit himself.
(George Colegay, farmer, Marshgate, Essex; and James Scotchman, hairdresser, Stratford, gave the prisoner Enever a good character.)
ENEVER— GUILTY . Aged 29.— Transported for Life.
LEE— NOT GUILTY .


The information available makes it difficult to be certain that this is the correct Joseph Enever but the locations and his age are correct. 
ENEVER, Joseph (I16176)
 
140 14 H-----d Road (unclear) BURGESS, Maud Alice (I20453)
 
141 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. SHIELDS, Simon (I25858)
 
142 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. ROTSEY, Mikaela (I22924)
 
143 15479/1888 SUTTOR, Phyllis Augusta Bligh (I3054)
 
144 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. LANG, Bradley John (I17673)
 
145 17 years in NSW. IRELAND, Griffith Stromer (I17397)
 
146 17373. Family (spouse) F10504
 
147 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. LANG, Sharon Maree (I17675)
 
148 1824 7th March. Baptised at Ardley Church, Bicester, Oxon, Robert Darvill Andrews, base-born son of Hannah Andrews of Ardley, Pauper, by W.T. Loveday, Curate.
 
ANDREWS, Robert Darvill (I26770)
 
149 1831 - Dec 31st - X - DIBBER Thomas, widower - X - ANDREWS Hannah, spin - (B.T. 26th) - Witnesses - Richard BUTLER & William PLUMBE Family (spouse) F578
 
150 1838 Welch Fusiliers in Canada
Robert Darvil Andrews 1 - Canada
1841 5th March (17) Enlisted in 66th Regt of Foot, under-age, at Gosport
1842 1st April (18) transferred to 1st. battalion 23rd Regt, Royal Welsh Fusiliers
1842 30th June (18) Service in Canada started

' in 1842 a ‘Reserve’ Battalion of the 23rd was formed in Chichester from men of the Depot companies (of the Royal Welch Fusiliers) plus two new companies. This too sailed to Canada arriving at Kingston on July 6th and remained there,'

1844 12th May (20) Promoted to Corporal
1845 25th April (21) Tried and imprisoned for 3 days and reverted to Private.
1847 25th April (23) Admitted to 1st class good conduct pay
1848 4th August (24) Forfeited it
c1851 married Susan McBride
1851 26th September (27) Promoted Corporal
1852 1st.March (27) Re-admitted to 1st Class Good Conduct Pay
1852 1st.November(28) Promoted to Sergeant
1852 (28) Son, William Andrews, born in Toronto
1853 7th.July (29) Service in Canada completed
Source: Joyce Affleck 
ANDREWS, Robert Darvill (I26770)
 
151 1841 census indicates couple are married. Family (spouse) F104
 
152 1841 census is unclear, age may be 50 or 58.
1851 census gives age as 70. 
FARMER, Jane (I2131)
 
153 1841 census records a George Lawson aged 75 in Heversahm and with an occupation of vicar. Not proven to be this George Lawson but seems likely. LAWSON, George (I3657)
 
154 1841 census records age as 5 months but there is no birth regn found in 1841. HARRIS, Elizabeth (I172)
 
155 1851 census records N America as b/place, 1861 indicates Essex. GIBBS, George (I2118)
 
156 1855: 30th April Aged 33 5ft 7 3/4 brown hair, hazel eyes, long visage fresh complexion. Noted as having cut on the forehead, marks on neck, arms and body. Charged with feloniously assaulting and wounding one William Dean with intent to harm at Hartpury on 24th June 1854. Guilty of unlawfully wounding. Sentenced passed one calendar month hard labour in the penitentiary, April 30 1855, discharged 1855 April 30, term expired. Native of Hartpury married 6 children has been working for W J Charlton a contractor.

Also an article in the paper:
1855: Gloucester Journal Sat 7th April 1855 Spring Assizes Col 5 Assaulting a Sheriff's Officer.

Charles Brain and Charles Hyam were indicated for unlawfully assaulting William Dean, the Sheriff's officer at Hartpury. Mr Skinner prosecuted; Mr Cooke defended the prisoners. The prosecutor had been put in possession of the prisoners Brain's house at Hartpury, in about an hour after he had been there Brain appeared and although Dean explained what he was there for, Brain ordered him out; and on his refusing to go he said he would make him, and commenced a violent assault on him and on the other officer Fox, who was with him. With a formidable bludgeon armed with nails, which made Dean's arm was very much injured. The other prisoner stood at the door, urging Brain to go on and kill them. The jury found Brain guilty of unlawfully wounding, Hyam was acquitted. Mr Cooke stated that the verdict for 10d damages against the prisoner had been obtained in the County Court - Sentenced deferred.

Source Anna Wilson

Charles Brain's mother was a Hyam and it it is probable that Charles Hyam was a member of her family. 
BRAIN, Charles (I2588)
 
157 1860 15-Mar Hannah BEECROFT bigamy ignored bill .
http://www.wirksworth.org.uk/B47-CRIM.htm
http://www.derbycourt.com/index/data/1860.html

It isn't certain that this is Hannah but it seems highly likely (see http://www.ennever.com/histories/historymarriages.php ) 
TILSON, Hannah (I4152)
 
158 1861 census records birthplace as Elingford, possibly Chingford? PEARSON, Martha (I1826)
 
159 1862 Thomas James; born Bowna, married Kate Gertrude Mitchell 1891, Occupation Grazier, two children KIRKPATRICK, Thomas James (I18179)
 
160 1866 John Roast 41 B Labourer KH William Roast LabourerLucy Ann Enever 40 S Servant D William Enever Labourerwit. James Roast Elizabeth Roast
Source: http://www.historyhouse.co.uk/kelvedonhatch/marriages_1837_1898.html

Lucy Ann recorded as 40 years. 
Family (spouse) F5659
 
161 1867
Thomas William Quilter 23 B Labourer KH William Quilter Labourer
Charlotte Clarke 21 S KH Joseph Clarke Labourer
wit. George Enever Martha Enever
Source: http://www.historyhouse.co.uk/kelvedonhatch/marriages_1837_1898.html 
Family (spouse) F5660
 
162 1870
Jonathon Enever 30 B Labourer KH John Enever Labourer
Emma Crabb 21 S KH John Crabb Labourer
wit. Walter Malyon Emily Quilter
http://www.historyhouse.co.uk/kelvedonhatch/marriages_1837_1898.html 
Family (spouse) F4490
 
163 1870's census he was living in Pittsburg PA with mother Sarah, brother Louis, and sister Sarah White and worked for railroad..1880's census he was still in Pittsburg but married to Ellen and had 2 children: Sarah born in England and John R. born in PA..They settled in Hoquiam, WA around 1882 and the rest of their children(Percy, Kenneth, Annie B. and Ada C.) were born in Centralia, WA. PEEL, John (I3656)
 
164 1871 census records b/place as Queensbury. Both Queensbury and Thornton are east of Bradford. IBBOTSON, Martha (I1368)
 
165 1871 census records Drury Lane, London as birthplace.
1861 census records Limehouse, Middx as birthplace. 
LEE, Charlotte (I51)
 
166 1880
James Enever 32 B Labourer George Enever Labourer
Maria Sarling 26 S KH George Sarling Labourer
wit. George Quilter Eliza Barker
http://www.historyhouse.co.uk/kelvedonhatch/marriages_1837_1898.html 
Family (spouse) F4880
 
167 1880 Staying with uncle Gilbert Foskit in Wales, Hampden Co. Mass.
1900 Farm Labourer living in Webster, Worcester Co. Mass.
4/10/1951 Arrived in Southampton aboard Queen Mary from New York.
Destination address 21 Marley Ave Bexleyheath Kent
27/11/1951 Arrived in New York from Southampton aboard the Queen Elizabeth
destination address 727 Main Street Worcester Mass. 
SIZER, Robert Charles (I27402)
 
168 1881 census records the family as Hanoway. Progressively from that date many of the family are christened and/or married as Hannaway and recorded as such on censuses. ENNEVER, Jane Elizabeth (I173)
 
169 1881 census records the family as Hanoway. Progressively from that date many of the family are christened and/or married as Hannaway and recorded as such on censuses. HARRIS, Elizabeth (I172)
 
170 1881 census records the family as Hanoway. Progressively from that date many of the family are christened and/or married as Hannaway and recorded as such on censuses. ENNEVER, John William (I168)
 
171 1881 census records the family as Hanoway. Progressively from that date many of the family are christened and/or married as Hannaway and recorded as such on censuses. Interestingly, the birth of Alfred William in May 1881 is recorded as Ennever. ENNEVER, John William (I170)
 
172 1881 census records the parents' family as Hanoway. Progressively from that date many of the family are christened and/or married as Hannaway and recorded as such on censuses. 1901 census records this family as Hannaway, although the eldest child (Elizabeth Blanche) is christened as Ennever, the other 9 are christened as Hannaway. HANNAWAY, Charles William (I2047)
 
173 1881 census records the parents' family as Hanoway. Progressively from that date many of the family are christened and/or married as Hannaway and recorded as such on censuses. 1901 census records this family as Hannaway, although the eldest child (Elizabeth Blanche) is christened as Ennever, the other 9 are christened as Hannaway. HANNAWAY, Ilene (I2046)
 
174 1881 census records the parents' family as Hanoway. Progressively from that date many of the family are christened and/or married as Hannaway and recorded as such on censuses. 1901 census records this family as Hannaway, although the eldest child (Elizabeth Blanche) is christened as Ennever, the other 9 are christened as Hannaway. HANNAWAY, Winifred (I2045)
 
175 1881 census records the parents' family as Hanoway. Progressively from that date many of the family are christened and/or married as Hannaway and recorded as such on censuses. 1901 census records this family as Hannaway, although the eldest child (Elizabeth Blanche) is christened as Ennever, the other 9 are christened as Hannaway. HANNAWAY, Matilda May (I2044)
 
176 1881 census records the parents' family as Hanoway. Progressively from that date many of the family are christened and/or married as Hannaway and recorded as such on censuses. 1901 census records this family as Hannaway, although the eldest child (Elizabeth Blanche) is christened as Ennever, the other 9 are christened as Hannaway. HANNAWAY, Ellen Rosetta (I2043)
 
177 1881 census records the parents' family as Hanoway. Progressively from that date many of the family are christened and/or married as Hannaway and recorded as such on censuses. 1901 census records this family as Hannaway, although the eldest child (Elizabeth Blanche) is christened as Ennever, the other 9 are christened as Hannaway. HANNAWAY, Joseph Henry (I2042)
 
178 1881 census records the parents' family as Hanoway. Progressively from that date many of the family are christened and/or married as Hannaway and recorded as such on censuses. 1901 census records this family as Hannaway, although the eldest child (Elizabeth Blanche) is christened as Ennever, the other 9 are christened as Hannaway. HANNAWAY, George (I2041)
 
179 1881 census records the parents' family as Hanoway. Progressively from that date many of the family are christened and/or married as Hannaway and recorded as such on censuses. 1901 census records this family as Hannaway, although the eldest child (Elizabeth Blanche) is christened as Ennever, the other 9 are christened as Hannaway. HANNAWAY, John William (I2040)
 
180 1881 census records the parents' family as Hanoway. Progressively from that date many of the family are christened and/or married as Hannaway and recorded as such on censuses. 1901 census records this family as Hannaway, although the eldest child (Elizabeth Blanche) is christened as Ennever, the other 9 are christened as Hannaway. HANNAWAY, Adelaide Maud (I2039)
 
181 1881 census records the parents' family as Hanoway. Progressively from that date many of the family are christened and/or married as Hannaway and recorded as such on censuses. 1901 census records this family as Hannaway, although the eldest child (Elizabeth Blanche) is christened as Ennever, the other 9 are christened as Hannaway. GRADY, Ellen (I169)
 
182 1881 census records the parents' family as Hanoway. Progressively from that date many of the family are christened and/or married as Hannaway and recorded as such on censuses. 1901 census records this family as Hannaway, although the eldest child (Elizabeth Blanche) is christened as Ennever, the other 9 are christened as Hannaway. ENNEVER, John William (I168)
 
183 1881-"History of Stark County, Ohio", edited by, William Henry Perrin, page 745, "City of Alliance,"--George W. Sourbeck, restaurant
keeper; Alliance; was born in Bridgeport, Cumberland Co., PA, Feb. 26, 1837. He is the oldest son of John Sourbeck, by his second wife (Sarah A. Collier). The subject of these notes was only 7 years old (really 10 yrs old) at the time his father drowned (which event is noted in the sketch of Daniel Sourbeck), therefore he was early in life necessitated to do for himself, and began his career as driver on the canal from Harrisburg to Nanticoke and Wilkesbarre. This he followed one season, when he went to Mechanicsburg and apprenticed himself in the boot and shoe trade, and remained there six years. In 1855, he came to Alliance, and was engaged in his brother's dining hall at the railroad depot, for about one and a half years. He went to Youngstown and engaged at his trade for a short time when he accepted a clerkship in the Union Hotel, where he remained for two years. He purchased the passenger dining-rooms on Liberty street, Pittsburgh, which he conducted about a year, sold out and returned to Youngstown, Ohio, and Jan. 3, 1861, he married Mary A. Wilson. They moved to Allegheny City (Pittsburgh), PA, where he began to "run" on the Pittsburgh, Ft. Wayne, & Chicago Railroad, and soon was promoted to a conductorship on the road, which position he retained seven years, when he was appointed Night-train Dispatcher at the outer depot for one year, and then returned to his position as conductor, and "ran" one year when he resigned to engage in the hotel business in Alliance, having been running the Exchange Hotel about ten months, when, on May 22, 1871, it burned. He then opened the restaurant close to the depot, which he has conducted ever since with much success. They have five children, viz.---Alva L., Emma S., Harry P., George W. Jr., and Lillie C."

Cleveland, Ohio - City Directories:
1891, G.W. Sourbeck's Sons - Vendome Restaurant 218 Seneca
1892, Sourbeck Brothers, (Alva L., Harry P., & George W.) Proprietors, Vendome
Restaurant, 218 Seneca
1893, Sourbeck, Alva L (Sourbeck's) 130 Huron
Sourbeck, George W 130 Huron
Sourbeck, Harry P 130 Huron
Sourbeck, Mary J., Mrs. (Sourbeck's) 130 Huron
Sourbeck's (Mrs. Mary J. & Alva L. Sourbeck) Proprietors, Vendome
Restaurant, 218 Deneca

Source: Jason Herrmann 
SOURBECK, George Washington (I10397)
 
184 1891 census shows a Mary Ann Sergeant as servant aged 17 ENNEVER, Robert Ponder (I42)
 
185 1895/96 John Hunter (Hunter) – Hunterdoesn’t appear on the NSW BDM Index but on a document which he signed relatingto his application for registration as an Architect dated 10/9/1923, he stateshis age as 27 years 9 months which means he was born approximately December1895 or January 1896.  This fits in withhis father’s death certificate where the children are listed in order of birthwith the ages at the time of his death noted.
 
Althoughit is unconfirmed, Hunter may have attended The Junior High School, atRandwick, also known as “Alanson’s School” after the Head Teacher, A GAlanson.  This name (Alfred GodwinAlanson) is listed as one of four referees on his application for “B”certificate and also appears on the list of mourners at his father’sfuneral.  A G Alanson was a highlyrespected teacher, children’s author and President of the NSW Public SchoolTeachers’ Association from 1909-10.  Thereis a Sarah Elizabeth Alanson of 149 Darley Road, Randwick as a witness onHunter’s mother’s Will.  Annie andHoward’s signatures appear on the document.

Source: Heather Klatt 
KIRKPATRICK, John Hunter (I18024)
 
186 1895: (A Baillie Scott )Forms partnership with Henry Seton Morris, thought to have also been a pupil of Davis, who sets up an office in both names at 30 Great James Street, London.
Exhibit entrance design for a house, for Manx author Hall Caine, at the Royal Academy.

1897: Association with Morris flounders, possibly following introduction to Wilfred Bond in 1896. Bond was clerk of works on St. Matthew's Church, Douglas for James Loughborough Pearson, until Pearson's death. He then joined Baillie Scott and was his assistant until 1901.

Source: http://www.victorianweb.org/art/design/bailliescott/chron.html 
MORRIS, Henry Seton (I11066)
 
187 1897
Abraham Enever 23 B Gardener Ashted Surrey Jonathan Enever Labourer
Fanny Jessie Hobby 22 S KH Willie Hobby Gardener
wit. William Charles Hobby Clara Hobby Florence Mary Hobby William Enever
http://www.historyhouse.co.uk/kelvedonhatch/marriages_1837_1898.html 
Family (spouse) F4492
 
188 1900 census records date of immigration as 1854. ENNEVER, Sarah Jane (I698)
 
189 1901 census records Stratford as Emma'a birthplace but this seems unlikely as her parents were married in 1872 in Kent and were in Gibraltar shortly after that. MIDLANE, Emma Frances (I5056)
 
190 1907/B5464BarrcroftGeorge HenryStratfordLaura Jane Family (spouse) F7817
 
191 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. JONES, unknown (I12696)
 
192 1913 Andrew ENNEVER found drowned in West India Docks
Age recorded as 34.

Rosetta's Barnado's file states that he had committed suicide and his body had been in the water for a fortnight. 
ENNEVER, Andrew Henry (I318)
 
193 1914 Star and Clasp. TRIBE, Arthur Stanley (I784)
 
194 1914/15 Star issued
British War Medal issued 2/1921
Victoria Medal issued 2/1921 
ENNEVER, Arthur Sidney (I22)
 
195 1918/02/22 Private in Norfolk Regiment, son of Sarah Wilder Ennever of Canning Town (P3909) ENNEVER, Samuel Francis (I108)
 
196 1928/8016Winifred Rose Ferguson Arthur Desmond Morris Family (spouse) F6597
 
197 1930 appears to record 1897 but is unclear. UNKNOWN, Minnie (I30188)
 
198 1930 census gives ages at first marriage as 35 (Napier) and 20 (Nellie) so it seems likely this is a 2nd marriage. Family (spouse) F2975
 
199 1949/21419Taylor Patricia Mary 23Y Not proved. TAYLOR, Patricia Mary (I23425)
 
200 1953-4 Ration Book THOMAS, Horace (I25659)
 
201 1959, Mar 22 - A letter written on George's stationary, George Sourbeck, 693 E. 236 Street, New York City, to Harry L. Sourbeck, 231 West Wayne St., Alliance, Ohio: "Dear Cousins, I am pleased to have this opportunity to say hello for the first time. It all started last year when my older brother Washington was asked by an Ohio brick manufacturer named Hoiles, if he was related to anyone in Ohio. (Their meeting was about finishing brick for a school building, brother Washington was in charge of specifications).

When he was told my father George was born in Alliance, Mr. Hoiles was so pleased, that he promised to get a reproduction of a radio biography story of our great gradfather Daniel, that was broadcast as a Public Service in 1953 over WFAH operated by his relative. We did receive the recordings he promised and I had themn transmitted to tape for the family's pleasure and reference.

I have since written to the Alliance Public Library who so graciously forwarded the Centennial book and your address, which makes me believe you must be one of Uncle Al's children (my father's older brother) whom, I have heard about years ago, when grandma and auntie came East and stayed awhile. And I hope we will have the pleasure of meeting each other some day.

There are a few questions you may help me clear up. Where is the family buried, including great grandfather, so that I may, some day take a trip and pay my respects. And if there are any old photo copies of the Sourbeck homestead and of grandpa and great grandfather or any interesting information that you should have me know about, for my family scrap book, would be very much appreciated. If there is any expense involved please let me know.

I do hope that you are in the best of health and may I have the pleasure of hearing from you soo. Sincerely, Cousin George.

P.S. There are (3 of us brothers, 1 nephew, 4 nieces, 3 grand nieces, 1 grand nephew that are bearing the Sourbeck name in the East."

He enclosed a photo-"Excuse this 12 year photo-I was 57 last."

The original letter is in the possession of Dale A. Sourbeck, Harleysville, PA. He received it from Mrs. Harry L. Sourbeck (Marie Katherine Harpley) in July of 1965.

1959, Apr 24 - Another letter written on a Birthday Card to Harry Sourbeck: Dear Harry, Received your letter which explained your background and I was able to reason how you are related to me. Your grandfather, W.H.H. and my grandad, G.W. were brothers. Their father was Daniel Sourbeck, founder of the famous Sourbeck's hotels in New Brighton, PA, and Alliance. He is the pioneer the Industrial Information Institute gave tribute to in 1953 broadcasts which I have a copy of. You should go to the Alliance Public Library and read up on his background, which they claim to have, (see Mrs. Mowry). This information should be very interesting to obtain, so let me know when we can see each other. Regards and Happy Birthday, Cousin George."

In this last communication, George is correct when he states that Harry's and his grandfather (W.H.H. & G.W.), are brothers. They were, but, Daniel was not their father. Daniel was their 1/2 older brother which the this FTM file identifies and proves.


Buried Trinity Cemetery, Hewlett, Long Island, NY

Source: Rootsweb Jason Herrmann 
SOURBECK, George Robert (I7647)
 
202 1973/36445Taylor Ethel Mary 9 June 1893 (birth date incorrectly recorded as 1893, should have been 9 June 1889). MORRIS, Ellie Mary (I3139)
 
203 1974/36547 KENNEDY, Mary Evelyn Sherard (I28003)
 
204 1975/43304 GOYMER, Reginald Compton (I27969)
 
205 1988/49083 WESTWOOD, William Firth (I34370)
 
206 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. CORNWELL, Grant Paul MBE (I7409)
 
207 1st Class Battleship, 1st Division, Home Fleet. HM Dockyard, Chatham. ENEVER, Albert Victor (I14806)
 
208 1st cousins. Family (spouse) F2749
 
209 1st enumeration ENNEVER, Thomas Charlock (I10412)
 
210 1st enumeration. With wife, Anne. ENNEVER, William C (I10410)
 
211 1st floor front. KESNER, Alfred Lionel (I16951)
 
212 2 Bridge Terrace is listed in the 1911 census as being next to 13 Parnham Street. FULCHER, Minnie (I7227)
 
213 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. HAY, Ian William (I8222)
 
214 2 days old. GROUT, Sidney George (I16716)
 
215 2 doors away from Isabella. ROSSITER, Edmund (I23397)
 
216 2 grandchildren of Aaron & Mary are with her, assumed to be her children but not proven. OAKLEY, Eliza (I5804)
 
217 2 houses away from Edmund. JOYCE, Isabella (I23398)
 
218 2 possible christenings in Feckenham in 1815. HOUGHTON, Thomas (I5645)
 
219 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. MCDONALD, Michelle Linda (I25862)
 
220 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. SHIELDS, Christian (I25857)
 
221 20 MAR 1924 Elected Mayor of Glenwood
1924 Served as one of six men who served as a bodyguard for President Coolidge at the MN State Fair
BET 1927 AND 1929 State House of Representatives
NOV 1931 Appointed Judge of Probate by Governor Floyd B. Olson
Source: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=amundsonwing&id=I10250 
BARSNESS, Edward Andreas (I3564)
 
222 21 Feb 1884. Porter. Age 26.*[RAIL 529/131/362 Folio 77.]
Porter. New appt. Pay 18s. [RAIL 529/52 4 Mar 1884, Loco ComMin 5392.]
25 Feb 1885. Fined 6d for being absent from his post.*
8 Oct 1885. Porter, Dalston, to Watchman, Devons Road. Pay18s to 21s. [RAIL 529/52, 3 Nov 1885, Loco,etc, Cttee Min 5988.] 8 Oct 1885. [RAIL410/1831, E.]
23 Mar 1886. Watchman, Devons Road, to signalman BroadStreet No 1. Pay 21s.*
7 Apr 1886. Signalman, Broad Street No 1, to Mildmay Park.Pay 21s to 23s. [RAIL 529/53 5 May 1886, Loco Com Min 6168.]
1 Jan 1887. Cautioned as to his future working (two trainsin one section).*
4 Mar 1888. Signalman, Mildmay Park, to Dunloe Street. Pay23s to 24s. [RAIL 529/54 11 Apr 1888, Loco Com Min 6887.]
2 Aug 1892. Signalman, Dunloe Street, to Shoreditch. Pay 24sto 25s. [RAIL 529/56 5 Oct 1892, Loco Com Min 8596.]
5 Nov 1892. Seen and cautioned for quarrelling withSignalman Brown at Dunloe Street.*
24 May 1897. Wages increased to 27s (Board Min 5448).*
18 Jul 1898. Cautioned for causing 2 minute delay to apassenger train (9.16 am ex-Poplar).*
27 Feb 1901. Signalman, Shoreditch, to Western Junction. Pay27s to 29s 6d. [RAIL 529/60 2 May 1901, Loco Com Min 11381.]
18 Nov 1904. Seen by Traffic Superintendent and suspendedthree days with loss of pay for allowing two trains into one section.
10 Jan 1908. Signalman, Western Junction to Barnsbury. Pay29s 6d to 30s. [RAIL 529/64, 5 Mar 1908, Loco Com Min 13555.]
Signalman, Canonbury. Age 65, service 38 years, rate of pay67s 6d, “B” Rate 65s. per week. Granted a Good Conduct Retiring Allowance of21s 8d per week. [RAIL 529/34, 29 Jun 1922 Board Min 9523.]
Source: Peter Bloomfield 
ELSOM, Henry James (I1351)
 
223 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. MORRIS, Margaret (I21488)
 
224 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. HIGGINS, Tanya (I34105)
 
225 25 Jul 1912Waverley Cem. C of E Section, Rev. R.Mckeown officiating, Charles Kinsela
undertaker 
ENNEVER, Charles Henry (I271)
 
226 26. EDWARD GARDNER (24) , Robbery, with others, with violence, on Thomas Tadman, and stealing a watch and chain, his property.

MR. WOODGATE Prosecuted, and MR. BURNIE Defended.

THOMAS TADMAN . I am an undertaker, of 422, Cable Street—on August 29th, about nine p.m., I was in Johnson Street, and the prisoner, whom I knew by sight, snatched my watch, and said, "Give me that"—he ran across the street—I ran after him, and got hold of him by his coat, and a man rushed up and said, "If you don't leave go of him I will stick a knife into you"—I let go, and he ran across the street—I ran after him, and when I got to the corner of the street I was knocked down on my knees by a tall man, the one who had threatened me with the knife—I jumped up, and called "Stop thief!" and ran after the prisoner, and when I got to the corner of Thomas Street three or four men said, "Knock the old b——down and kill him"—the prisoner was not with those men; he was running in front—I got up again, and found my arm bleeding—it was broken by a kick when I was down, and was trying to save my head—I went to the hospital—I knew the prisoner, because he came and asked me to go bail for his brother the Sessions before last, who got five years' penal servitude—I came here on purpose to look for him, when his brother was here, and saw him in a public—house opposite this Court, and gave him in custody—when he was in custody he wanted to shake hands and said, "Mr. Tadman, I would not rob you of your watch."

Cross-examined. He never said, "You have got the wrong man," nor did I say so before the Magistrate—I did not know his name or address when the robbery was committed—I did not know that the other man was his brother, or that his name was Gardner—I went with him to a beer—house with a man named Eccleston—I told the policeman he might be found at 'Eccleston's, not the same night—I did not see Smith till I came out of the hospital—I went to Eccleston's two nights, and had police all round the place—Johnson Street leads from Commercial Road into Cable Street—this robbery took place close to our coach—house—I was going home—Mrs. Le Fevre was with me, and must have seen my watch snatched—this happened near a lamp—the prisoner would never have got away from me if it had not been for the man breaking my arm—Mrs. Le Fevre did not run with me; she was frightened, and was in bed next day—I do not know a Mrs. Stephenson—I did not send her to the station to identify the prisoner, nor Mrs. Le Fevre, nor any woman—Thursby works for my wife—I did not ask him to go to the station to identify the prisoner, but the police did—my wife has done several things for Mrs. Neendroff, but she is not dependent upon her—I did not say to Smith, the officer, "Whoever is brought in will be identified"—I went to draw £18 out—I did not get till ten minutes to nine at the George Public—house—I did not go into the George—I am not a teetotaler; I had twopenny worth of whisky with Mrs. Le Fevre, but I had nothing between 7.30 and then.

Re-examined. There is no ground for suggesting that I was drunk; I had to do our stables afterwards—I knew that Gardner was the name of the man I was asked to be bail for, but I did not know the prisoner was his brother till afterwards.

HENRY JAMES THURSBY . I live at 423, Cable Street, and am in Mr. Tadman's employ—on August 29th, at nine p.m., I heard a cry of "Stopthief!" and the prisoner ran almost into my arms, and turned round and stumbled as he came, and then turned back again—about a fortnight afterwards I saw him at the station with fifteen or sixteen other men, and identified him—I knew his face the moment I saw him.

Cross-examined. On the Tuesday night Mr. Tadman said, "We have got the chap who took my watch; I want you to go to—night and identify him"—I described the man who ran into my arms to the police, as about my height, hardly as tall, slight moustache, and a light jacket buttoned up, or a guernsey.

By the COURT. I told Mr. Tadman that I had seen the man, and he asked me to identify him—I saw Mr. Tadman in the hospital.

ANN NEENDROFF . On August 29th I was living at Dr. Barnardo's, in Dock Street, and about nine p.m. I heard a cry of "Stop thief!"—I saw a man run out of Short Street towards the railway arch; he stumbled and fell on his right knee—I put my hand on his shoulder, and somebody called out, "Look out, missis; he has got a knife!"—I saw his face—he got away from me, as I had a baby in my arms—Mr. Tadman came to the corner, and the man jumped up and went across the street—I after-wards picked him out from a lot of others at the Police—station; the prisoner is the man.

Cross-examined. I hesitated because I did not see any cuff, or anything round his neck, but I was certain of his features—I am certain of him now; the more I see him in the dock the more certain I get—this all happened in a moment—I go to Mrs. Tadman's every day; she has been very kind to me as regards my little boy, but my husband supports me.

Re-examined. The prisoner looked up in my face, and he was very white, like a corpse when I saw him at the station he was dressed like a gentleman, but he had no cutis or collar on.

WILLIAM SMITH (Police—Sergeant II). I found the prisoner detained at Bridewell Police—station—I told him the charge—he said nothing, but afterwards he said, "I would not do such a thing to Mr. Tadmun; he came to bail my brother out the other day. I was at Charley Elphinstone's the other evening, and we talked about my brother being stabbed"—he was taken to the station and identified by four witnesses.

Cross-examined. Mrs. Neendroff hesitated—Mrs. Stephenson and her daughter failed to identify him—on September 6th Tadman said, "Who ever is brought in will be identified," but I did not take much notice of what he said, because he was under the influence of drink—he could speak, but he was very excited.

HERBERT CHARLES ELSMORE . I am a hospital surgeon—I was on duty on August 29th, when Tadman was brought in—he had a compound fracture of the right fore—arm; both bones were broken across, and there was a small wound in the skin by the bone coming through it, and bruising on the back of his arm by his elbow—the injuries were serious; he was under my treatment about a week, and then he was sent to the out-patients' department—I do not think he will have the use of his hand again.

Cross-examined. The injuries might have been caused by a fall.

THOMAS TADMAN (Re-examined). I am married—my wife had seen the prisoner when he came to me about being bail for his brother—I first identified him in the public—house in the Old Bailey—my wife was with me; she had been out four days, looking for him—it was in consequence of something she said that I went to the public—house to find him—while I was in the hospital I made a communication to my wife as to who the man was who took my watch.

GUILTY .

He then PLEADED GUILTY** to a conviction at Chelmsford on October 15th, 1890, of robbery from the person.— Eighteen Months Hard Labour. 
TADMAN, Thomas (I6452)
 
227 2nd baptism!

Performed by S Davies, Curate. 
ENNEVER, Frederick (I337)
 
228 2nd daughter died an infant.
Extracted from the Overton family bible.
Assumed to be Maria Failes Overton d1837 Wisbech. 
OVERTON, Maria Failes (I13481)
 
229 2nd Division. DOOLEY, Matthew (I2260)
 
230 2nd enumeration ENNEVER, Thomas Charlock (I10412)
 
231 2nd enumeration (not present in 1st). Age recorded as 26. ENNEVER, William C (I10410)
 
232 2nd enumeration, with parents. Anne not present. ENNEVER, William C (I10410)
 
233 2nd given name unclear. Recorded as Lucy P Long in 1851 census. LONG, Lucy (I8692)
 
234 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. ENEVER, John (I12160)
 
235 32287/1913  ENEVER, Charles S (I15251)
 
236 362. GEORGE ELLIOTT (30) , Robbery with violence, with Edward Gardner and other persons unknown, on Thomas Tadman, and stealing a watch, his property.

MR. SHERWOOD Prosecuted, and MR. PURCELL Defended.

THOMAS TADMAN . I am' an undertaker and jobmaster, of 422, Cable Street, Shad well—on August 29th, at 8.45 p.m., I was near the railway arch in Johnson Street, and saw five men—the prisoner was one of them—I have known him a long while, and have drank with him, and you tried Gardner and gave him five years; he wanted me to be bail for him—I had a gold lever watch, value £20, and a big Albert chain, and one of them, Gardner, said, "Give me this; if you don't, I will murder you"—I got knocked on my hands and knees by a man named Soldier, and kicked—I let go and they ran away—I called "Stop thief!" and when I got into the next street they knocked me down again, and the prisoner kicked me and broke my arm in two places—I halloaed "Stop thief"—I went to the London Hospital, and they told me I should have to have my arm taken off—I was an in-patient about a fortnight, and two portions of bone were removed—I cannot use my arm now; I cannot bend it—I continued an out-patient three months—there was a lamp—I have not seen my watch since—on October 5th, about ten a.m., my wife was driving me in the Mile End Road, and I saw the prisoner and said, "That is the man I want"—he went up one street and down another, and when he got to Jack's Hill, where a lot of bad characters live, he gave a parcel to someone and ran away, and I lost sight of him—I saw him again in the Commercial Road, and not again till I saw him at Dalston Station about six weeks ago with about twenty others, and I identified him—I said, "You know me, Joe"—he looked at me and said nothing.

Cross-examined. Mrs. Le Fevre was with me when I was robbed; I had been with her about a quarter of an hour—I never go to the George Public-house—I gave evidence against Gardner on November 15th—I never said, "I did not get to the George till ten minutes to nine. I did not go into the George; I am not a teetotaler. I had two-pennywort of whisky with Mrs. Le Fevre"—if I stated that, and it was taken down by the shorthand writer and printed in the Sessions Paper, it was a mistake—Gardner ran away into Thursby's arms—there was a witness who lives at Dr. Bernardo's who saw a man running—Mrs. Le Fevre is not here, nor is Henry James Thursby or Ann Newdrop—Johnson Street, where I was robbed, is a very lonely street, all private houses, and the only light was from the lamp—I should have had all the men that night if I could have got out of the hospital—I know Gardner's brother—I was asked to be bail for him, but I refused—that was at the Mansion House—it came here, and I saw Gardner in a public-house outside this Court—I did not mention when Gardner was tried that one of the men was George Elliott—that is not the prisoner's right name—his wife told me his right name—I saw her yesterday—when he was in custody I had told the police that I knew him by sight, and they placed him with nineteen strangers—I did not know anything about them—I am quite sure the prisoner is one of the men who robbed me—I am quite sure he kicked my arm and broke it in two places—when I was attacked I ran after my watch, and lost sight of Mrs. Le Fevre.

Re-examined. I was in the habit of seeing the men at a beershop, and that is where they spotted my watch—the Gardners were there, and another one who has got fifteen months—I was in the habit of seeing Gardner—I buried his father-in-law.

By the COURT. Between August 9th and the time the prisoner was taken, excepting the time he ran away, I could never find him in any of the places where I used to see him; he left all those places.

WILLIAM KEMP (Policeman). I was present when Tadman identified the prisoner—he picked him out from ten or twelve others—he touched him and said, "That is the man."

The prisoner's statement before the Magistrate: "I can produce plenty of witnesses to prove where I was that night."

GUILTY . 
TADMAN, Thomas (I6452)
 
237 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. BRENNAN, Britta Else (I32314)
 
238 48396 Enever Sarah - 1840 10 June East Maitland BR

Free Emigrant. Died aged 38.Buried in Glebe Cemetery

Source: http://www.jenwilletts.com 
RICHARDSON, Sarah (I23700)
 
239 4m. MILLS, Edith Henrietta (I34183)
 
240 5 days old. CROWE, Marjorie Pattie (I28810)
 
241 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. ENNEVER, Margaret Ann (I646)
 
242 571. THOMAS TADMAN (30) , Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin.

MESSRS. POLAND and O'CONNELL conducted the Prosecution; and MR. RIBTON

the Defence.

MARY ROBBIE . I am a widow, and keep a corn-chandler's shop at Stepney Green—on 31st May, about 8 o'clock at night, I served the prisoner with a truss of straw, a truss of hay, a truss of clover, and a bushel of oats—they came to 11s., 9d.—he gave me a half-sovereign and a florin, and I gave him 3d. change—he took the goods away in his cart, and about three minutes after he had gone, I found the half-sovereign was bad—I kept it in my hand, and sent my lad to find the cart, but be could not, and I put the coin in a cupboard, and afterwards took it to the Police Court—I there saw the prisoner in a cell, with three more, and picked him out—he was not pointed out to me in any way—a man without an arm was in the cart with the prisoner, and another man held the horse.

Cross-examined. He was from five to ten minutes in the house—the gas had just been lighted—my lad assisted in putting the things into the cart—I had no other half-sovereign—the prisoner wore a high hat when he came, and I told the policeman so—I did not see a high hat on any of the other men in the cell—it was not the hat which drew my attention, I recognized the man's features—I did not say before the Magistrate that I could not recognize him till he put his hat on, but he put on his hat, and I said he was the man—I did not say before the Magistrate that I could not identify him unless his hat was on.

Re-examined. I recognized him by his features, and by his hat, too—he had a hat in the cell—I think I should have recognized him if he had been without his hat—I never failed to recognize him without his hat—I did not see him without it till he was at the bar—it is not correct that I failed to recognize him till he put it on—he bad it on when I went to the cell door—I have not the least doubt about him.

THOMAS HENRY BEALAND . I am fifteen years old, and am servant to Mrs. Robbie—on 31st May, in the evening, I helped the prisoner to put some hay and oats into his cart, and he put the clover in—two other persons were with him—he had a black horse in his cart.

Cross-examined. I was taken by a constable to the prisoner's cell, and said, at first, that I could not identify him—three other gentlemen were in the cell with him, and were brought out with him—I could not pick him out—I think the others had their hats on; I am not quite sure—the other three had round hats on—they were all of a row—one of the policemen did not nudge me, and say "Go on, pick him out"—I told the policeman outside, a second time, that I could not pick him out, and I did not do so at all—I think the prisoner is the man—I walked away without saying whether he was the man or not—I told them I did not know anyone there—I next saw him at the Police Court.

LYDIA BAGGARLY . My husband keeps the Hand in Hand, New Kent Road—on 2nd June, a little after 6 o'clock, I served the prisoner with a pint of ale—he laid down a good sovereign—I went up stairs to a drawer in my bedroom, and took out a half-sovereign, and 10s., in silver—I left another half-sovereign there—I have one key of the drawer, and my husband another—no one else has a key—I went down, and gave the prisoner the half-sovereign, and 9s., 6d. in silver, and then went to the till, and gave him 3d. in coppers—he then asked me if I would give him all silver—I said "Yes"—he laid a half-sovereign on the counter—I took it up—it felt
See original Click to see original

very slippery—I weighed it, and found it bad—I took it into the bar-parlour, and said to my husband "You must either have taken this bad half-sovereign, or this man has changed it"—the girl, Elizabeth Stevens, then took it, and said "Let me look at it"—I did not see her give it to my husband—the prisoner said "I have not touched the money"—my husband said to me "I can take an oath that you could not have given that half-sovereign to the man"—I don't believe it was the same half-sovereign that I had brought down and given to the prisoner—I had not noticed that the one I gave him was slippery.

Cross-examined. I do not say it is not the same, because it is bad—we never take any gold without weighing it, therefore it cannot have been the same—my husband had taken it—I cannot say when there was only one other sovereign in the drawer, and no sovereigns—there were other people in the shop who said they had not seen him touch the half-sovereign—the counter was not wet with beer where he stood—that was the only part that was dry—a man named Burridge, an undertaker, lives near us—two of his men came in—I do not know that the prisoner had been at Burridge's, looking after a horse—he had a horse and trap at the door—he is, I believe, an undertaker—he might have been in the house twenty minutes.

ELIZABETH STEVENS . I am Mrs. Baggarly's servant—I saw the prisoner there on 2nd June, my mistress brought in a half-sovereign and was going to put it on the table, I asked her to let me look at it, and she gave it into my hand, I put it between my teeth and found it was bad, I gave it to my master—it had not gone out of my possession.

GEORGE BAGGARLY . I remember the night—the prisoner was at my house—there is a drawer up stairs where I kept money, of which I have one key, and my wife the other—there were two half-sovereigns—I had taken them, and passed them—I am quite sure they were good—I was called up from the cellar into the parlour—the girl handed me a half-sovereign—I saw the prisoner there, and my wife said "You have either taken a bad half-sovereign, or else this man has changed it—I put it on the scale and found it light—I told the prisoner I should detain him; he said if I gave him in charge he would make me pay for it, for he had plenty of money—I sent for a policeman—the prisoner said he would drive me to the station if I liked—he seemed anxious to get out, but I stood by the door—he said he thought he was as good a man as I was, and we had better come and settle it outside—I declined—he said he should not stop any longer, pushed me from the door, jumped up in his cart, and without stopping for his carter to get in, drove away as hard as he could—I ran after him, halloaing, "Stop him," but he whipped the horse all the way—two boys ran after him, and he tried to slash them with the whip—a policeman came—a young man stopped him, and he walked back with the policeman to my house—I showed the policeman the half-sovereign—the prisoner said "Let us look at it," and took hold of it—he put it in his mouth, and said "I could swallow it if I liked"—he appeared to swallow something, and I believe he swallowed the good one—he then offered me ten shillings not to give him a showing up—I gave him in custody, with the half-sovereign—he had a black horse, and I believe he is an undertaker—he offered at the station to give me a half-sovereign or a sovereign, not to charge him.

Cross-examined. I did not say before the Magistrate that he offered me a sovereign, I did not think of it—I have not talked about it to any policeman—there was only two half-sovereigns in my drawer, as I had paid away
See original Click to see original

all the gold I had on Tuesday—I took these two half-sovereigns of two of the neighbour's children, at different times, one of whom I can recollect by name—I never take coin without weighing it, and I weighed these—I have not made inquiry of the children, because the coins I took were good.

ROBERT ATKINSON (Policeman P 365). I was called, and saw the prisoner in a cart in Wellington Street, galloping, and beating the horse with a whip—a crowd gathered round, calling "Stop thief!"—he was stopped, and the prosecutor charged him, and I took him back to the shop—I looked at the half-sovereign and found it bad—the prisoner asked to look at it—I let him do so—he threw his hand up to his mouth, and handed back a bad half-sovereign—I did not see anything go into his mouth, but I saw him swallowing afterwards—he said he would give Mr. Baggarly a half-sovereign to settle it—I searched him at the station, and found 19s., 9d. in good money—there was not a dent on the half-sovereign when I was examined at the Police Court, it has been made since.

Cross-examined. The horse was going as fast as he could—the dent in the half-sovereign was done when it was marked at the station.

WILLIAM MASON (Police Inspector M) On 2nd June I was at the station when the prisoner was brought in—he said to Mr. Baggarly "I will give you ten shillings or a sovereign not to charge me"—Mr. Baggarly said that he should, and the prisoner said "If you book this charge against me I shall hold you responsible"—after the adjournment on the 14th Mrs. Robbie saw the prisoner with four others in a cell at the Police Court—she at once went up to him, placed her hand on him and said "That is the man"—she gave me this half-sovereign on the 14th.

Cross-examined. She said nothing before she identified him about his having a high hat, but she did after she came out of the cell—there were four others in the cell, not three only—most of them had billycock hats—he was I think the only one with a high hat—she did not tell me before she identified him that he had a high hat, or that she could not identify him unless he put his hat on—the Magistrate did not order him in my presence to put his hat on—but I was not in Court all the time—I don't know who the other men were, they were in charge—the boy failed altogether to pick him out, though they were brought out of the cell.

WILLIAM JOHN WEBSTER . These two half-sovereigns are bad, and from the same mould,; they are both light.

Witnesses for the Defence.

GEORGE DOUGHTY . I am a general contractor in the building trade, of 8, Globe Road, Bethnal Green—I have know the prisoner seven or eight years, he is an undertaker at Shadwell—I have always known him to be respectable—he has buried several of my relatives, which caused me to know him—on 31st May, he was in my company for three hours, from 5.45 or 6.15 in the evening till past 9 o'clock—it was then dark—I went with him to look at his stable at Shadwell, about some repairs he wanted me to do, it is seven or eight minutes' walk from his house—we remained at the stable three-quarters of an hour, I then went to my house; we parted just before dusk, before 9 o'clock—I was not at his house at all—we were at my house an hour and three-quarters or two hours, talking, before we went to the stable—I know it was 31st May from being at home for my holiday, I was not transacting any business—it was Tuesday evening in Whitsun week—I saw by the papers last Sunday week that he was in custody.

Cross-examined by MR. POLAND. He is not a particular friend of mine,
See original Click to see original

only in the way of business—I did nothing at the stable, I could not come to terms with him—I saw it in the Weekly Dispatch or Lloyd's—the prisoner's father ascertained from my brother where I lived, as he did not know, and he asked me if I knew what evening it was Mr. Tadman had been to my house—that was after I saw it in the newspaper—I did not come forward when I saw it in the newspaper, I was too busy, but the father came to me—my wife was at home, she came here with me to-day, but whether she is here now I don't know—I keep no servant; my daughters were out—the prisoner walked to me—you can go from my house to some parts of Stepney Green in about fifteen minutes—it took us half an hour and five minutes to walk to the prisoner's stable—the prisoner has never had penal servitude, on my oath—I know nothing about his committing a watch robbery—he has never been in unlawful possession of a decanter—his father is not a friend of mine, he is here.

Re-examined. My wife opened the door to the prisoner, but she was not with us all the time.

COURT. Q. You saw the stable, do you know what animal he keeps there? A. A black funeral horse, and a funeral carriage—he keeps no private trap.

John Turner, a gentleman's servant;. Joseph Goodfellow, an undertaker; Mary McFarlane, a shop keeper; and John Vicars, a servant, gave the prisoner a good character.

MR. POLAND called

EDWARD DILLON (Police Sergeant A 19). I have known the prisoner since 1862, when he came out of prison, after having four years—I had him in custody in January, 1864—I have known him up to the present time—he lives not very far from our station."

Cross-examined. He had four years' penal servitude, and I can tell you some more, if you wish to know it.

MARY ROBBIE (re-called). The Magistrate asked me what sort of a hat he wore—I said I did not know the names of hats, and he told the prisoner to put his hat on—I then said that that was the sort of hat he wore.

GUILTY — Twelve Months' Imprisonment. 
TADMAN, Thomas (I6452)
 
243 6
Charles Raymond KIRKBY
m
John Ritchie KIRKBY
Charlotte Louisa BENJAMIN
16 Jun 1886
11 Dec 1944

Father:
John Ritchie KIRKBY
 

Mother:
Charlotte Louisa KIRKBY née BENJAMIN
 

Born on:
16 Jun 1886
at:
 Ellerslie,Fingal,TAS,AUS
 

Birth:
It is in the collection of Registrar-Generals' Division (TAS) and can be  identified as Birth Certificate with the reference yy2. Research performed on Friday 28th January 2005
 

Baptised on:
 
at:
 
 

Baptism:
 
 

Occupation:
Insurance Superintendent
 

Married to:
Emma Isobel KIRKBY née WALKER
 

Married on:
26 Dec 1911
at:
 Urana NSW AUS
 

Marriage:
It is in the collection of Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages (NSW) and can be  identified as Marriage Certificate with the reference 1911/14753. Research performed on Saturday 29th January 2005
 

Marriage:
It is in the collection of  and can be  identified as NSW Births, Deaths and Marriages 1889-1918 (Federation Index) with the reference 14753/1911. Research performed on Wednesday 21st December 2005
 

Died on:
11 Dec 1944
at:
 
 

Buried on:
13 Dec 1944
at:
 Church of England Cemetry,Rookwood Cemetery,NSW,AUS
 
Source: Judith Paul 
KIRKBY, Charles Raymond (I24804)
 
244 6 children had died before the 1911 census and are probably:

Albert Timms b1882 d1882
Mary Timms b1883 d1883
Elizabeth Timmsa b 1884 d1884
Edith May Timmsa b1889 d1892
Daisy Annie Timms b1893 d 1896
Ellen Mary Timms b1893 d1894 
TIMMS, Martha (I14120)
 
245 6 days old. GREGORY, Donald (I9485)
 
246 6.0am THOMAS, Horace (I25659)
 
247 6w old DERMEDY, Nellie (I34120)
 
248 7 days old. FAULKNER, Sarah (I33295)
 
249 7 days old. MOLLETT, Bertram Benjamin E (I20276)
 
250 7 weeks. HUNTER, Ann Jane Stewart (I33668)
 

      1 2 3 4 5 ... 38» Next»

Copyright © Barry Ennever 2006-2017. All rights reserved. Information provided for personal use only (click here for terms of use/privacy policy).
Site powered by TNG, hosted by TSO.  See home page for site update information.