Search
Last name:
First name:
Married last name
Ennever & Enever family history & ancestry. Click here to return to the home page WJ Ennever (1869-1947). From the portrait by J Seymour R.A., exhibited in the Royal Academy.

Joseph ENEVER

Joseph ENEVER

Male 1808 - Yes, date unknown

Personal Information    |    View    |    Event Map    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name  Joseph ENEVER 
    Nickname  Joe 
    Born  12 Sep 1808 
    Christened  9 Oct 1808  Parish Church, St Peter and St Paul, Dagenham, Essex Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Joseph Enever
    Joseph Enever
    Parish register
    Gender  Male 
    Occupation  Abt 1825  East India Company Find all individuals with events at this location 
    See letter seeking mitigation of transportation sentence 
    Living  26 Apr 1830  St Catherine Cree, City of London Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Living  20 Oct 1831  Mile End Old Town, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Occupation  20 Oct 1831 
    Turner 
    Occupation  Abt 1835 
    Policeman, K Division 
    Living  8 Jun 1835  Princes Street, Whitechapel, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Occupation  8 Jun 1835 
    Turner 
    Occupation  Abt 1836 
    Publican 
    Criminal  8 May 1837  Central Criminal Court, London Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Joseph Enever, John Lee, Theft > animal theft, Theft > receiving, 8th May 1837. 
    • 1225. JOSEPH ENEVER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March, at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, 1 mare, price 25l., the property of Francis Henry Beall; and JOHN LEE , for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.
      MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the Prosecution.
      THOMAS WARNER . I am a farmer, and live at Alborough hatch, near Ilford, Essex. A mare belonging to Mr. Beall, was brought to me, about the 22nd of November—I saw it last on the 16th of March, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, and directed it to be driven into Epping Forest—George Hale had charge of it on the forest—I have seen Mr. Beall several times since—he has not paid me for the keep of the horse—I have not yet delivered him any bill—his servant it here—I saw the mare again on the 7th of April, in custody of the police—is was the same mare that was taken away on the 16th of March—I had received it from Devonish—it had a very particular head and countenance.
      Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. How long prior to the 16th of March was she turned out on the forest? A. It was turned out that morning, and had been there about a fortnight, but was brought home at night.
      FRANCIS HENRY BEALL . I have a bay mare, which I sent to Mr. Warner, the first week in December, or last week in November—it has a remarkable forehead and face, what I call rather a sour countenance—I saw her again on the 8th of April, at Brick-lane station-house—I am quite certain it was the same mare—she was in a wretched condition then—when in condition, she was worth full 30l.—there was a scar made on her forehead, which was not there when I sent her—I think it had been produced with caustic—it had not destroyed the cuticle, but had taken off the hair.
      GEORGE HALE . I am eleven years old. I was in Mr. Warner's employ in March last—I took the mare to Epping Forest—she had not been there above three or four hours, when a man came and took her away—I told him it was not his mare, but he never made me any answer—he put a halter on her, and was very quick—he jumped on her back and rode her away—he had no saddle—I had no one to help me—I went home and told master—I should know the man again—I am quite sure the prisoner Enever is the man—I had seen him before—I did not know his name, but I knew him by sight—I had seen him on the Forest—I saw the mare again at the station-house—I had her in my care some time.
      Cross-examined. Q. You were looking after the horse? A. Yes, it was along with our colts—there was no other horse there—I am quite certain of the prisoner—it was between three and four o'clock in the afternoon
      See original 
      —I cannot state the time nearer than that—he had on a kind of blue coat, like he has on now—I saw the boy King when I went back to my master's, and I told him.
      THOMAS DEVONISH I am servant to Mr. Beall. I have groomed the mare for two years—I took it to Mr. Warner's—I have seen her since at the station-house—there was a great deal of difference in her there, but I have not the least doubt of her being master's—she was very plain and awkward about her head, and had a very sour countenance—she had a very particular mark on her near hind leg, in her fetlock joint—a white and black mark.
      JOHN DOUGLAS . I am a policeman. About twelve o'clock at night, on the 18th of March, I was on duty in Lamb's-gardens, Bethnal-green—the prisoner Lee is a housekeeper there—I do not know what he is—a woman of the town was making a noise in front of his house, and he gave charge of her—she was taken to the station-house by two other police-men—she complained of ill usage from him—he had refused to admit her, and she broke his window—she said to him, "If you serve me out, I will serve you out; go and bring that stolen horse out of your stable, at the back of your house"—I had refused before that to take her, unless he went to give charge of her—he then said he would go and press the charge at the station-house—when they proceeded a little way, I left them with two others, and turned back—I knocked at the door of Lee's house, and Enever opened the door—I said, "Oh, Enever, I am surprised to see you here; I did not expect to see you here"—he said, "Why?"—I said the officers were after him a few days before, I heard, in a case of felony, and I said, "What is this about the horse?"—he made no answer to that—I said, "Let us see him?"—he took the light off the table, and opened a door at the back of the room which led into a stable—I there saw a bay mare—I asked him who it belonged to—"Oh," he said, "It is Lee's mare, which his brother lent him to work with"—I examined the mare particularly, so that I might look over the list of stolen horses in the "Hue and Cry," and then went to the station-house—I overtook the woman before they got there, but Lee was gone—after the woman was charged, I went back again to Lee's house, and knocked at the door—nobody opened it—I remained there about twenty minutes—I then went round to the back of the house, where the stable is—looked through a little window in the stable, and the mare was gone—I have seen her since, but she was in different condition to what she was then—when I saw her in the stable, she looked as if she had not been groomed for some time, but I am certain it is the same one I have seen since.
      Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you know of the prisoners being brought to the police-office? A. I did not—I first heard of it nine or ten days ago—I think they had then been finally committed—I did not go to the office to give evidence—Enever was called by the name of Joe—Lee gave the woman in charge for breaking his window—I did not know him living there before.
      MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Who was in the house besides Lee? A. Two females.
      COURT. Q. Why not take Enever into custody at first, when you knew the police were after him? A. That was only hearsay.
      MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know of any reward being offered about the horse? A. I heard of it about nine days ago—I gave this information before that—directly I heard they were taken, Power, the
      See original 
      policeman, told me they were in custody—I told him what had happened—that was before I heard of the reward—I had given information before that to different constables, but not to Power—I do not know whether the prisoners were committed at that time.
      MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. When did you give information of what you had observed about the mare? A. Immediately—I informed the inspector on duty—at the time I saw Power, the prisoners had been in custody some time, and the horse was found—I do not expect any of the reward.
      THOMAS CUMMING . I am a policeman. In consequence of information, on the 4th of April I went to a chandler's shop in Weymouth-terrace, Hackney-road, and went from there to a stable, where I found a mare—I did not Hake her away at first—I watched there, and at half-past three o'clock in the afternoon I heard a noise in the stable—Power and Clements went into the stable, and I went in at another door—I saw the prisoner Lee there—power said, "You are my prisoner, on suspicion of stealing this mare"—he said, "(I did not steal the mare, it belongs to my master"—I took the mare out of the stable, and the constable took Lee—I asked who his master was—he said, "I don't know him, he is a tall man"—I asked where he lived—he said he did not know—I said, it was very strange he Should have a master, and not know where he lived—he said, "I don't Know"—I took the mare to the station-house, and put it into Leach's stable in Brick-lane—I and some other constables went about half-past four o'clock to Lamb's-buildings, and took Enever within about 200 yards from there, coming down a court—I said "You are my prisoner"—he said, "What for?'—I said, "For stealing that mare you have got"—he said, "I know no mare, I have got no mare"—I took him to the station-house, searched him, and found a small padlock-key on him—I tried it to the lock we took off the stable-door in Weymouth-street, and it locked and unlocked it—when he heard us say that it did so, he said it belonged to his lodging, and he said, "I have no mare"—he said Power knew how he got his living.
      Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was Power present at the time you had the conversation with Lee? A. He was—I did not hear Lee say he was in company with his master when the stable was taken for the mare—he might have said so to Power, and I not hear it.
      DENNIS POWER . I am a policeman. I went to the stable in Weymouth-terrace, on the 4th of April, with Cumming—after watching some time, I saw Lee there—he was about to supply the horse with food—the account Cumming has given of the conversation with Lee, is correct—I was the first that entered the stable—I told Lee he was my prisoner, on suspicion. of stealing, the mare—he then stated, that he got a pot of beer and 1s. a week occasionally, from his master, for looking after this mare—I asked him, was he in company with his master at the time he took the stable—the said he was on the first occasion—I told him not to say any thing to criminate himself—I received some information from Douglas—the reward was offered immediately after the horse was stolen—we had got the mare and the parties were committed to Newgate before I saw Douglas.
      EDWARD CLEMENTS . I am a policeman. I was present with Cumming and Power at the stable, in Weymouth-terrace—I have heard their evidence, and agree with it—this padlock came from the stable, and this key, found on Enever, locked and unlocked it.
      ALEXINA FLETCHER . 1 am the wife of Ephraim Fletcher, and live at the corner of Weymouth-terrace. The stable the horse was found in belongs
      See original 
      to my husband—both the prisoners came to hire it, on the 20th of March between twelve and one o'clock—my husband was not there then—Lee asked me what the rent was—Enever told me they wanted to put a hone in, which they must take in from grass—in about twenty minutes Enever came alone, and asked me if my husband had come in—I said no, he would be in between one and two o'clock—nothing more passed—he came again between one and two o'clock, and made a bargain with my husband for the stable—I have often seen Enever—he was generally dressed in a jacket and sleeves—on one occasion I saw him in a blue body coat, and I think boots.
      Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. At the last meeting did he not, say the horse had been out to grass, and the reason he took it from grass was, that the man wanted the land for arable land? A. Yes—I do not think I was ever asked before whether Lee asked me about the rent—I think I have said before that he did—I am certain it was Lee.
      EPHRAIM FLETCHER . The stable belongs to me—I and Enever were in the stable—he said he wished to see me, to make the bargain that there should be no dispute about the rent afterwards—we came to an agreement—he was to pay 2s. a week, and he paid me 1s. deposit—I did not see Lee myself, till about Easter Monday, the 27th of March—Lee fed the horse, and Enever swept the stable up.
      Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you not let it to Enever? A. Yes—it is a close stable—he paid me the 1s. deposit himself.
      (George Colegay, farmer, Marshgate, Essex; and James Scotchman, hairdresser, Stratford, gave the prisoner Enever a good character.)
      ENEVER— GUILTY . Aged 29.— Transported for Life.
      LEE— NOT GUILTY .


      The information available makes it difficult to be certain that this is the correct Joseph Enever but the locations and his age are correct.
    Joseph Enever
    Joseph Enever
    Home Office: Criminal Petitions: Series I
    p1/5
    Joseph Enever
    Joseph Enever
    Home Office: Criminal Petitions: Series I
    p2/5
    Joseph Enever
    Joseph Enever
    Home Office: Criminal Petitions: Series I
    p3/5
    Joseph Enever
    Joseph Enever
    Home Office: Criminal Petitions: Series I
    p4/5
    Joseph Enever
    Joseph Enever
    Home Office: Criminal Petitions: Series I
    p5/5
    Joseph Enever
    Joseph Enever
    JOSEPH ENEVER, JOHN LEE, Theft > animal theft, Theft > receiving, 8th May 1837.
    Joseph Enever
    Joseph Enever
    JOSEPH ENEVER, JOHN LEE, Theft > animal theft, Theft > receiving, 8th May 1837.
    Joseph Enever
    Joseph Enever
    JOSEPH ENEVER, JOHN LEE, Theft > animal theft, Theft > receiving, 8th May 1837.
    Joseph Enever
    Joseph Enever
    JOSEPH ENEVER, JOHN LEE, Theft > animal theft, Theft > receiving, 8th May 1837.
    Joseph Enever
    Joseph Enever
    The Times 13/4/1837
    Joseph Enever
    Joseph Enever
    The Times 12/5/1837
    Joseph Enever
    Joseph Enever
    The Times 15/5/1837
    Emigration  2 Oct 1837  New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Title: Joseph Enever, one of 224 convicts transported on the Waterloo, 02 October 1837.
      Details: Sentence details: Convicted at Central Criminal Court for a term of life.
      Vessel: Waterloo.
      Date of Departure: 02 October 1837.
      Place of Arrival: New South Wales.
      Source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 90, Class and Piece Number HO11/11, Page Number 147 (75)
      Author/Creator: Great Britain. Home Office. ; State Library of Queensland.
      Subjects: Enever, Joseph ; Waterloo (Ship) ; Convicts -- Australia -- Registers ; Australia -- Genealogy
      Publisher: Canberra A.C.T. : Australian Joint Copying Project
      Is Part Of: Criminal : Convict transportation registers [HO 11]


      State: New South Wales
      Country: Australia
      Arrival Date: 8 February 1838
      Given Name: JOSEPH
      Surname: Enever
      Ship Name: WATERLOO

      Also recorded as in Maitland in 1841 (Source: http://www.jenwilletts.com)
      120040 Enever Joseph Waterloo 1838 1841 8 January Maitland GG
      Labourer aged 31 from Essex. 5'10
    Living  8 Jan 1841  Maitland, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died  Yes, date unknown 
    Person ID  I16176  1. Essex Ennevers
    Last Modified  25 Feb 2013 

    Father  James ENEVER,   Born:  24 Oct 1776,   Died:  Before 1827 
    Mother  Susanna WHIFFIN,   Born:  1777/8, Haverhill, Essex Find all individuals with events at this location,   Died:  Yes, date unknown 
    Married  14 Nov 1802  Parish Church, St Leonard, Shoreditch, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location 
    James Enever & Susanna Whiffin
    James Enever & Susanna Whiffin
    Parish register
    Family histories
    Questions remaining
    Questions remaining
    Some of the mysteries and outstanding questions about the Ennevers and associated families that you may be able to help me with.
    Family ID  F4387  Family Group Sheet

    Family (spouse)  Sarah RICHARDSON,   Born:  1801/2,   Died:  Jun 1840 
    Married  26 Apr 1830  Parish Church, St Catherine Cree, City of London Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Joseph Enever & Sarah Richardson
    Joseph Enever & Sarah Richardson
    Parish register
    Children 
     1. Harriet ENEVER,   Chr:  20 Oct 1831, Parish Church, St Dunstan, Stepney, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location,   Died:  Yes, date unknown
     2. Sarah ENEVER,   Born:  8 Jun 1835,   Died:  Yes, date unknown
    Family ID  F7464  Family Group Sheet

  • Event Map

    (nb pins may represent approximate locations)
    Link to Google MapsChristened - 9 Oct 1808 - Parish Church, St Peter and St Paul, Dagenham, Essex Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLiving - 26 Apr 1830 - St Catherine Cree, City of London Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 26 Apr 1830 - Parish Church, St Catherine Cree, City of London Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLiving - 20 Oct 1831 - Mile End Old Town, Middlesex Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLiving - 8 Jun 1835 - Princes Street, Whitechapel, Middlesex Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCriminal - Joseph Enever, John Lee, Theft > animal theft, Theft > receiving, 8th May 1837. - 8 May 1837 - Central Criminal Court, London Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsEmigration - 2 Oct 1837 - New South Wales, Australia Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLiving - 8 Jan 1841 - Maitland, New South Wales, Australia Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Family histories
    Criminals and law-breakers in the Ennever and associated families
    Criminals and law-breakers in the Ennever and associated families
    A list of all known law-breakers and their crimes
    Questions remaining
    Questions remaining
    Some of the mysteries and outstanding questions about the Ennevers and associated families that you may be able to help me with.


Copyright © Barry Ennever 2006-2015. All rights reserved. Information provided for personal use only (click here for terms of use/privacy policy).
Site powered by TNG, hosted by TSO.  See home page for site update information.