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Ennever & Enever family history & ancestry. Click here to return to the home page WJ Ennever (1869-1947). From the portrait by J Seymour R.A., exhibited in the Royal Academy.

Elizabeth WADE

Female 1813 - 1888  (75 years)


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  • Name Elizabeth WADE 
    Born 1813  Thorpe by Water, Harringworth, Northamptonshire Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Christened 7 May 1813  Harringworth, Northamptonshire Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    Living 29 Jul 1839  8 James Street, St Luke, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Living 12 Jul 1840  8 James Street, St Luke, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Census 1 Jun 1841  8 James Street, Parrs Place, St Luke, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Age recorded as 33
    Living 22 Jan 1842  8 James Street, Parrs Place, St Luke, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Living 13 Feb 1842  James Street, Goswell Road, St Luke, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Living 12 Nov 1843  James Street, St Luke, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Living 5 Apr 1846  James Street, Goswell Road, St Luke, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Living 14 Feb 1847  Charles Street, St Luke, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Misc 15 May 1848  Old Bailey, London Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Theft from William & Elizabeth Ennever 
    • See text included in William Ennever.
    William & Elizabeth Ennever
    William & Elizabeth Ennever
    Theft from their house
    Criminal 21 Oct 1850  Old Bailey, London Find all individuals with events at this location 
    theft from a specified place. 
    • ELIZABETH ENNEVER, Theft > theft from a specified place, 21st October 1850.

      Reference Number: t18501021-1858
      Offence: Theft > theft from a specified place
      Verdict: Guilty > with recommendation
      Punishment: Imprisonment > other
      See original

      1858. ELIZABETH ENNEVER , stealing, in the dwelling-house of John Heppal, 3 memorandum-books, and other goods, value 1l. 8s., 15 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, 1 10l.-bank-note, and 1 5l.-bank-note; the property of Joseph Schollar.

      MR. WOOLLETT conducted the Prosecution.

      HANNAH SCHOLLAR . I am the wife of Joseph Schollar, we did live in Charles-street, Goswell-road. On 7th Oct. we were leaving, and I borrowed a carpet-bag of the prisoner—she brought it in, and I put in it a 10l.-note, a 5l.-note in a small Russian pocket-book, 16 sovereigns, three tea-spoons, and several other articles—the prisoner's husband was present when I placed them in the bag—this was about half-past six o'clock, or near seven in the evening—having placed them in the bag, I kept it in my possession till we left the house, and then I carried it to Frederick-street, Hampstead-road—I am sure that I had the bag under my eye all the time—my husband and his brother accompanied me—the prisoner was riding in the van, and we walked after it—the prisoner's husband and the carman were in the van—when we got there the prisoner was waiting at the bottom of Frederick-street—no one was with her—she told my husband she had been waiting for him, and asked him to treat her with a glass of brandy, which he did—she then went with me and my husband—when we got to the house I gave the carpet-bag to my husband's sister in the passage—she went up-stairs and placed it down by the side of the room, between the windows—the prisoner was there—I said, "It is safe," and the prisoner said, "Quite safe"—I then left the room, and left the prisoner and my sister-in-law in the room—when I returned, I met my sister-in-law within two stairs of the bottom—she had nothing in her hand—
      See original

      I then went into the room, the prisoner was not there—I did not miss the carpet-bag then—a man who helped us to move, was up and down the stairs—after I returned to the room I never left it—I missed the bag in about twenty minutes or half an hour—the carman and the man who assisted him, had been in the room, but not near where the carpet-bag was—I was the first that discovered my loss, and I thought it very strange—I went directly to the prisoner's house; she was not at home, her husband was—it was twelve o'clock when I and my husband got there—we waited till one, when the prisoner returned—I asked her what she had done with the carpet-bag—she paused, and said she really did not know, she wanted to know what the d—I she had done with it—we then proceeded home—we left her in the street at the door of her own residence—her husband was present—I have not seen the bag since.

      Cross-examined by MR. ROBINSON. Q. What time did you leave your house in Charles-street? A. About nine o'clock—that is perhaps two miles from Frederick-street—it was nearly half-past ten when we arrived in Frederick-street—we went straight there—we met the prisoner at the bottom of the street, and went to a public-house—we were five or six minutes in there—the prisoner had 3d. worth of brandy, and my husband and brother had some gin; I did not have any—we had been at the public-house where the van was waiting—that was before we met the prisoner at the corner of the street—we were in that house about ten minutes; we there had two pints of ale between six or seven of us—there was nothing else drank there—the prisoner was there, she had a drink of the ale, and some biscuits—I did not ride with her in the van—the carpet-bag was a large size—it was quite full—I was away from the room for three minutes: no one could have gone into the room without my seeing them—no one came out of the room—I did not see the prisoner come out of the room—I left her with my sister—she did not make any complaint in the house—in the street she said she had a pain in her stomach, and she asked my husband to treat her with brandy—when she left the room, she must have ascended the other flight of stairs—if she had come down I must have seen her—our room was on the first-floor.

      COURT. Q. You left your room for about three minutes? A. Yes; at that time I left my sister-in-law and the prisoner in it—when I got back to the room I found no one in it—I then did not leave it for twenty minutes, or half an hour—no one came in but the carman and my husband's brother, who assisted him—they did not come in exactly together, they came in two or three times—they were in sight of each other.

      ELIZABETH SCHOLLAR . I am the wife of the prosecutor's brother, and sister-in-law of the last witness. On 7th Oct. I helped to remove the goods from Charles-street to Frederick-street—I walked with the van—when we got to Frederick-street the prisoner gave me a bag—I took it up-stairs, and placed it between the two windows in the first-floor room—Mrs. Schollar and the prisoner were there—Mrs. Schollar went down—I remained a few minutes with the prisoner—I then went down to fetch other things, leaving the prisoner in the room—I met Mrs. Schollar on the stairs—when I returned to the room the prisoner was not there—I accompanied my sister-in-law to the prisoner's house, but the prisoner was not there—I did not stay till she returned—I believe the prisoner was quite sober when she came to Frederick-street.

      Cross-examined. Q. Did you have anything to drink? A. Yes; in the house we had some gin—I do not know who produced it: there was gin brought forward: I did not see the prisoner have any—there were six or
      See original

      seven persons helping to move—I believe they all had some gin, I had about half a glass.

      THOMAS BYERS . I am a carman, and live in Carburton-street—I remember removing these goods from Charles-street to Frederick street—I did not see any carpet bag—the prisoner and her husband rode in the van—when we got to Frederick-street the prisoner was quite sober—I gave her a small box off the van to carry.

      Cross-examined. Q. How much gin had you? A. One glass at the house—I had one draught of porter at the Coach and Horses—I did not go into any public-house after that—I should say it is a mile and a half from Charles-street to Frederick-street.

      WILLIAM DOWDEN . I am in the employ of Mr. Marsh, a cheesemonger, at No. 10, Saul's-row, Hampstead-road. I was in Frederick-street on the evening of 7th Oct.—I came out of the stable and had a pint of beer in the public-house, about nine o'clock—at the time I was there, the prosecutor and the prisoner, and the brother came in there—I came out and said to the carman, "Do you want any help?"—he said, "No"—the prisoner came out of the public-house, and went up-stairs with a box or something—that might be about twenty minutes past nine—I never saw her any more till she came out of the house, and ran up the street with her hands before her—she seemed to have something that was bulky, but what it was I cannot say.

      Cross-examined. Q. Who else came out of the public-house? A. Her husband was at the tail of the van, and Mr. Schollar was there—the prisoner had something bulky—I stood with my back against the van—I paid particular attention to her—when she was asked for I said, "She has gone up Frederick-street"—I am not now in Mr. Marsh's employ—I was employed last week at Mr. Devon's, to get up a sale—he paid me 3s. 6d. a day—I was with Mr. Slade, builder, for six years; I left about three months ago, they were slack of work, and my master's son-in-law married, and a person took my place—that was the only reason—I was employed as carman—I was Mr. Marsh's service on the 7th of Oct.

      JEREMIAH LOCKERBY (policeman, S 180). I heard of this on 10th Oct.—I went to Charles-street, Goswell-road, and apprehended the prisoner's husband first—I then went and told the officer to take the prisoner—she was told she was charged with stealing these things—she made no reply—I asked her if she had any objection to telling me where she went to, on leaving Frederick-street—she said she had no recollection of being there—I said, "You were somewhere that night, have you any objection to tell me where it was?"—she said, "I found myself sitting on the step of a door at one o'clock in the morning"—I asked if she could tell me where that was"—she said she could not—I said, "You don't mean to say that you were drunk"—the said, "I am sorry to say I was."

      (The prisoner received a good character.)

      GUILTY.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury. — Confined Six Months.

      Courtesy of OldBaileyOnline.org
    Elizabeth Wade (1813-1888)
    Elizabeth Wade (1813-1888)
    Criminal register
    Elizabeth Wade (1813-1888)
    Elizabeth Wade (1813-1888)
    Trial at Old Bailey (1 of 3)
    Elizabeth Wade (1813-1888)
    Elizabeth Wade (1813-1888)
    Trial at Old Bailey (2 of 3)
    Elizabeth Wade (1813-1888)
    Elizabeth Wade (1813-1888)
    Trial at Old Bailey (3 of 3)
    Elizabeth Ennever (nee Wade) (1813-1888)
    Elizabeth Ennever (nee Wade) (1813-1888)
    Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper 3/11/1850
    Criminal 1851  House of Correction, St Margaret, Westminster, London Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Census 1 Apr 1851  House of Correction, St Margaret, Westminster, London Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Occupation 1861 
    Laundress 
    Census 1 Apr 1861  10 Masons Place, St Luke, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Occupation 1871 
    No occupation 
    Census 1 Apr 1871  10 Masons Place, St Luke, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Recorded as Elizabeth Enever.
    Census 1 Apr 1881  13 Millman Mews, St Pancras, London Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died 28 Jun 1888  St Giles Workhouse, Holborn, London Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Aged 75.
    Elizabeth Ennever nee Wade (1813-1888)
    Elizabeth Ennever nee Wade (1813-1888)
    Workhouse register
    Buried 3 Jul 1888  St Pancras Cemetery, High Road, Finchley, London Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I210  1. Essex Ennevers
    Last Modified 14 Mar 2011 

    Father David WADE,   Died:  Yes, date unknown 
    Mother Elizabeth THORPE,   Died:  Yes, date unknown 
    Married 3 May 1798  Harringworth, Northamptonshire Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F69  Family Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family (spouse) William ENNEVER,   Chr:  28 Jul 1793, St Swithin's Church, Walcot, Somerset Find all individuals with events at this location,   Died:  6 Jun 1869, St Luke Workhouse, Shoreditch, London Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 75 years) 
    Married 29 Jul 1839  Parish Church, St Luke, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location 
    William Ennever & Elizabeth Wade
    William Ennever & Elizabeth Wade
    Parish register
    Children 
     1. William James ENNEVER,   Born:  21 Jun 1840, St Luke, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location,   Died:  Yes, date unknown
     2. John ENNEVER,   Born:  22 Jan 1842, 8 James Street, Parrs Place, St Luke, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location,   Died:  17 Mar 1915, St Pancras District, London Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years)
     3. Joseph Wade ENNEVER,   Born:  21 Oct 1843, St Luke, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location,   Died:  10 May 1908, Croydon, Surrey Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 64 years)
     4. Francis ENNEVER,   Born:  17 Mar 1846, Finsbury, London Find all individuals with events at this location,   Died:  Yes, date unknown  (Age ~ 0 years)
    Family histories
    Joseph Ennever and his criminal connections
    Joseph Ennever and his criminal connections
    A summary of the criminal activities of Joseph and his family
    Marriages to a closely-related family member
    Marriages to a closely-related family member
    (including to a dead spouse's sibling and a dead sibling's spouse and some bigamous and other illegal marriages)
    Family ID F63  Family Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 1813 - Thorpe by Water, Harringworth, Northamptonshire Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChristened - 7 May 1813 - Harringworth, Northamptonshire Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLiving - 29 Jul 1839 - 8 James Street, St Luke, Middlesex Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 29 Jul 1839 - Parish Church, St Luke, Middlesex Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLiving - 12 Jul 1840 - 8 James Street, St Luke, Middlesex Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1 Jun 1841 - 8 James Street, Parrs Place, St Luke, Middlesex Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLiving - 22 Jan 1842 - 8 James Street, Parrs Place, St Luke, Middlesex Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLiving - 13 Feb 1842 - James Street, Goswell Road, St Luke, Middlesex Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLiving - 12 Nov 1843 - James Street, St Luke, Middlesex Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLiving - 5 Apr 1846 - James Street, Goswell Road, St Luke, Middlesex Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLiving - 14 Feb 1847 - Charles Street, St Luke, Middlesex Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMisc - Theft from William & Elizabeth Ennever - 15 May 1848 - Old Bailey, London Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCriminal - theft from a specified place. - 21 Oct 1850 - Old Bailey, London Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCriminal - 1851 - House of Correction, St Margaret, Westminster, London Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1 Apr 1851 - House of Correction, St Margaret, Westminster, London Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1 Apr 1861 - 10 Masons Place, St Luke, Middlesex Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1 Apr 1871 - 10 Masons Place, St Luke, Middlesex Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1 Apr 1881 - 13 Millman Mews, St Pancras, London Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 28 Jun 1888 - St Giles Workhouse, Holborn, London Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - 3 Jul 1888 - St Pancras Cemetery, High Road, Finchley, London Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Family histories
    Criminals and law-breakers in the Ennever and associated families
    Criminals and law-breakers in the Ennever and associated families
    A list of all known family law-breakers and their crimes


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