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Ennever & Enever family history & ancestry. Click here to return to the home page WJ Ennever (1869-1947). From the portrait by J Seymour R.A., exhibited in the Royal Academy.

John KIRKPATRICK

John KIRKPATRICK

Male 1856 - 1923

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  • Name  John KIRKPATRICK 
    Born  12 Sep 1856  Albury, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender  Male 
    Living  28 Apr 1920  'Logan Brae', Victoria Road, Bellevue Hill, Woollahra, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Misc 
    • John Kirkpatrick was born near the town of Albury NSW Australia. He was the eldest of eight, (4 sons and 4 daughters) who lived on a small farm property known as 'Closeburn'. The family home is now underwater because the valley it sat in formed part of the Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area.

      At the age of 17 years John showed an interest in buildings and with the help from his father travelled to Sydney to become articled to Edmund Blacket, a prominent Sydney Architect. At 20 years of age and not through his articles, John designed his first building, the Anglican Church at Grenfell. John was ambitious and before setting up his own business, at age 23 years, was involved in the design of at least eight buildings while working with Blacket.

      Over the years John designed many notable buildings in Sydney CBD and regional areas. He was recognised by the building industry and the government of day as a leading architect. Mr Steve Malone in his Thesis of 1969 titled 'The Life and Work of John Kirkpatrick' is inspirational reading.

      There are many stories filed on the internet that list the achievements of John Kirkpatrick. A summary of his life and achievements may be read online on the Australian Dictionary of Biography site www.adb.online.anu.edu.au/biogs/A090612b.htm

      On the 24 May 1887 John married Annie Elizabeth Douglas Morris; they had nine (9) children: six girls and three boys, Lily; Herwald; Hilda; Rita; Hunter; Vere; Roger; Marjorie; Dorothy

      Herwald and Hunter became architescts: Herwald joined his father in the architectual practice that then traded as Kirkpatrick & Son while Hunter, the youngest son, went out on his own.

      John Kirkpatrick passed away on the 14th May 1923 at his home "Loganbrae" in Bellevue Hill. He was 67 years of age. John is buried at South Heads Cemetery
    Misc 
    • There is a family scrapbook which was donated to the National Library in Canberra.  In the scrapbook there is a reference to how proud John Kirkpatrick (Annie's husband) was of his heritage and his descendency from Empress Eugenie.  Empress Eugenie was Napoleon III's wife and the daughter of William Kirkpatrick.  One of Annie's daughters has the middle name of Eugenie.  I haven't been able to prove the direct line to date.  Another famous connection is Robert the Bruce, King of Scotland.  It was Roger Kirkpatrick who assisted him in killing the Red Comyn.  Roger's castle was on the boarder between England and Scotland and was in a very strategic position to warn of attackers.  I believe the Castle is still standing.

      An architectural student decided to do his thesis on John Kirkpatrick, the following is taken from that document.

      “At the age of 17, John went to Sydney Town and was articled to Edmund Blacket.  Blacket was an excellent architect and took John under his wing.  At the age of 20, being completing his articles, John designed his first building, a church at Grenfell, west of Bathurst, NSW.  (The church still stands.)  Some time around late 1879, he left Blacket's employ and apparently the family has a letter showing that this was on good terms. 

      John met Annie in 1887 when he was 31 and she was just 16.  Annie lived in Jamison Street and perhaps occupied one of the six first class houses Kirkpatrick had built there in 1880.  Her father, Charles Henry Morris, was a warehouseman and gave consent for the marriage, his daughter being under 21 years.  It is interesting to note that Kirkpatrick's address at this time is given as 183 Macquarie Street, Sydney which would mean he was living among some of the elite of the town.

      Kirkpatrick's energy and output in architecture was only matched by that which he put into being a father for over a period of some 15-20 years, his young wife was to bear him nine children.”

      Source: Heather Klatt nee Kirkpatrick
    Occupation  Architect 

    • Former Commonwealth Bank of Australia
      Other Name
      Commonwealth Savings Bank
      Other Name
      Townsville City Council Library
      Place ID
      602471
      Status
      Permanent Entry
      Address
      272-278 Flinders Street
      Town/Suburb
      TOWNSVILLE
      LGA
      TOWNSVILLE CITY COUNCIL
      Theme
      Financing Australia
      Significance
      The former Commonwealth Bank is important in demonstrating the pattern of Queensland's history as the first purpose built Commonwealth Bank building in Townsville. The construction of this major 1923 building reflects the significant role Townsville, as the leading Australian country branch for over sixty years, played in the establishment and regional development of the Commonwealth Bank.

      It is thought to be a rare surviving example in North Queensland of the commercial work of the Sydney architect and engineering consultant firm John & Herwald Kirkpatrick who were the first architects to work for the Commonwealth Bank of Australia. Apart from the Townsville office the Kirkpatrick firm designed the head office building in Sydney, the London and Melbourne buildings as well as a number of banks in other state capitals thus establishing a consistent architectural image for the Commonwealth Bank throughout Australia.

      The Bank building is important because of its contribution to the overall historical townscape of the city but particularly to the east Flinders Street area where it is located within a group of buildings including the former Post Office (600911), Perc Tucker Gallery (600912) and the former Aplin Brown & Company building (600919).

      The former Commonwealth Bank, built in 1923 using reinforced concrete, is one of the first multi storey buildings constructed in Townsville utilising this early twentieth century innovative technique. It is now a rare surviving example from the early period of use of this technology in Townsville

      The former Commonwealth Bank, Townsville has a special association with the work of Sydney architect and consultant engineering firm John & Herwald Kirkpatrick and with Townsville architect Walter Hunt who was known for his innovative work in designing reinforced concrete buildings.
      History
      The former Commonwealth Bank of Australia building, the third premises but first purpose build Townsville Commonwealth Bank building, was constructed in 1923 at a cost of approximately £30,000. The building was designed by Sydney architect and consultant engineering firm John and Herwald Kirkpatrick and constructed by Townsville builders Charles Hanson and Sons under the supervision of Townsville architect Walter Hunt.

      The federal government's Commonwealth Bank Act 1911 established Australia's first bank empowered to conduct both savings and general [trading] bank business with the security of a federal government guarantee. On 16 September 1912 the Commonwealth Government established the Commonwealth Bank of Australia. By 20 January 1913 the general business of the Bank had commenced in Canberra, in the six state capitals, in London and in Townsville. The Townsville office was the first country branch established in Australia.

      Initially the Bank operated from leased premises opposite the future site of the new building. However, following the amalgamation the Commonwealth Bank with the Queensland Government Savings Bank (QGSB) on 7 December 1920 the Bank moved its operations into the leased premises of the former QGSB near the corner of Stanley and Flinders Street. The Commonwealth Bank then purchased this property. In 1922 the site was sold to the Queensland State Government Insurance Office (now the site of the 1928 Queensland State Government Building (601385)). It is not know how long the Bank stayed in this location but it is possible it remained until 1924 when the new building was completed.

      In the meantime the Commonwealth Bank purchased an allotment for £5000 in Flinders Street adjacent to the Post Office (600911). This land was first issued as a Deed of Grant in November 1922 to the State Advances Corporation. Three months later, in February 1923, the land was sold to the Commonwealth Bank of Australia.

      Sydney architect and consultant engineering firm John and Herwald Kirkpatrick, designers of a number of early Commonwealth Bank buildings including the head office in Sydney, the Melbourne, Canberra and London offices, were commissioned to draw up plans for a new building in Townsville. John Kirkpatrick, appointed architect for the Commonwealth Bank in 1912, was a friend of and cousin to the Governor of the Bank, Denison Samuel King Miller. The Kirkpatrick architectural firm remained architects for the Commonwealth Bank for at least ten years. During that time bank buildings were constructed throughout Australia, the Pacific and England.

      This first purpose built Commonwealth Bank building in Townsville was constructed of reinforced concrete and brick. It is one of the earliest, if not the earliest surviving reinforced concrete multi storey building in Townsville. The supervising architect for the construction of the building, Walter Hunt, was an innovator in the use of reinforced concrete. At that time he was also designing the Dalgety & Company Building completed in Sturt Street, Townsville in December 1924

      Townsville building firm Charles Hanson and Sons secured the tender to erect the new two storied brick and reinforced concrete Commonwealth Bank building. By August 1923 the first floor walls were almost completed and the floor beams were being filled in with concrete. The builders had installed an electric dynamo to facilitate the easier handling and hauling of mixed concrete to the first floor level.

      In September 1923 the Queensland Architects and Builders Journal (A&B Journal) reported that the “first floor is laid and the columns to carry the flat roof are being filled. The framings of the beams of the first floor are now being removed and it is the contractors intention to commence plastering shortly”. The flat roof was made of concrete with a parapet wall.

      Sub contractors Harvey & Clarke, who specialized in joinery and shopfitting, carried out the joinery work.

      By February 1924 the A&B Journal reported that “…the Commonwealth Bank was housed in recently completed premises”. The building occupied a quarter acre block and accommodated the banking institution on the ground floor with the offices of the Deputy Public Curator on the first floor.

      The ground floor entrance led to a vestibule, to the left of which was the manager's room. The building was comprised of a two storey high banking chamber, complete with tellers and a strong room. At the rear of the building were the resident officer's room, gentlemen's lavatory and cloakroom and a ladies lavatory. A flight of stairs in the vestibule led to an upstairs landing which accommodated a cleaner's room and additional male and female lavatories at the rear. The building was said to be well lit.

      On 2 February 1924 the Townsville Evening Star reported on the “…near completion of the most attractive and up to date premises in the city…the building…is the architecture of Messers. John and Herwald G Kirkpatrick, architects and consultant engineers, Sydney”. The report said that the building was constructed on “…most modern lines, reinforced concrete being principally used, while many new features to the building trade of the North have been introduced”. These new features included ventilation and lighting, and ornate plaster work on the ceilings and substantial pillars in the banking chamber. A strong room was built behind the banking chamber. It was thought to be the largest in the north and was reinforced with steel railway rails. A Montgomerie Neilsen Oxidising nonseptic toilet system was installed with a large brick tank under the building. The special windows, which appear to be similar to those installed in the Sydney Head Office building, were special Simplex patented steel framed windows which adjusted to any angle. The building was electrically wired and had fans throughout and was constructed to allow the addition of two further floors. Thirty five massive concrete foundation pillars set up to 35 feet into the soil supported the structure. There was a clearance of six feet at the rear to about three feet on Flinders Street. The rear entrance was made secure with the installation of a “Chubb” door.

      Although, in the February 1924 issue of the Architects and Builders Journal, it was reported that “…the Commonwealth Bank was housed in recently completed premises” the Commonwealth Bank Archives has written a brief history of the Townsville Branch saying the new building was opened on 14 July 1924. No reference has been supplied for the 14 July 1924 opening date. The February opening date makes this the first country branch to occupy its own, purpose built office. However, if the Townsville branch opened in July then the Newcastle Branch was the first branch to open on 5 May 1924.

      During World War 11 the Commonwealth Bank, including the Townsville Branch, became heavily involved with Commonwealth War Bonds and other forms of government fund raising activities, as well as acting as local agents for the meat and clothes rationing authorities.

      Despite the financial constraints of wartime the banking chamber was refurbished in 1944. However, in the mid 1950s the thirty year old premises needed further maintenance work. Dilapidated counters and fittings required replacement, lighting needed upgrading, painting of the interior was necessary and new coverings for the floors. Consideration was also given to constructing a third floor on the building to serve as bachelor quarters. However, the whole project was deferred until 1954 when tenders were called but deferred again because of cost. In 1957 new plans were drawn up for extensive alterations and additions, including a new Teller line, installation of fluorescent lighting, painting, linoleum tiles to walls and floor, new staff amenities and storage area, new entrance doors and removal of the portico over the front door.

      The work was carried out by Brisbane builders N Kratzmann Pty Ltd at a cost of £54,283.15.2 and was completed in May 1959

      During the late 1940s and 1950s the Commonwealth Bank expanded its activities Australia wide, opening hundreds of branches and agencies to cater for the increase and spread of population accompanying Australia's great post war migration influx, and reflecting the buoyant national economy of the 1950s. In December 1959 the Commonwealth Bank of Australia was restructured and renamed the Commonwealth Banking Corporation
      To meet the needs of the expanding commercial centre and to overcome crowding in the branch building a sub-branch was opened at 471-473 Flinders Street in a twenty year old brick and concrete building. This sub branch became a full branch on 27 November 1967.

      By 1967 staff numbers in the main bank in Flinders Street had reached 64. Existing facilities were inadequate with no storage space and no space for interview rooms. By 1969 plans for a new building were in place. A property 800 metres west along Flinders Street was purchased for £269,000. The new four storied building with a tower block of a further 14 floors was designed by Townsville architects Martin Dillon and Associates and constructed by Townsville builders JM Kelly (Builders) Pty Ltd in 1975. At the time of construction the Branch had reached 111 staff, making it “…the largest branch, apart from the capital cities…in Australia”. Operations transferred to the new premises on 10 October 1977.

      The 1923 Commonwealth Bank property was subsequently exchanged for three blocks of vacant land owned by the Townsville City Council in Alfred Street, Aitkenvale where a branch of the bank was later built.

      In 1978 the Townsville City Council established the Council Library in the former Commonwealth Bank building. The library continued to operate from the building until 2003 when it was moved next door into the Northtown Building.

      The Townsville City Council sold the building to Aranda Park Pty Ltd in 1990 but continued to lease the property until the Library moved in 2003.
      Description
      The former Commonwealth Bank of Australia, Townsville is a two-storey reinforced concrete structure with reinforced concrete floors and flat roof with frontage to Flinders Street and also runs through to Ogden Street at the rear. The frontage was designed with five bays, the middle three projected slightly forward with four columns of a singular banded design flanking the three emphasised bays. These four columns have design similarity to columns of the bank's Sydney head office building though in render rather than stone. The columns have ovolo-moulded edges and the banding appears as strongly expressed recessed joints. A suggestion of art deco appears in the circular motif decoration below the top of the columns.

      Windows to the building are steel framed, rectangular with the larger sashes casement and the upper sashes pivot hung. A plinth, originally plastered but now veneered in grey granite, to window sill height runs across the width of the building interrupted by two doorways. The main doorway into the former banking chamber is centrally located with a second doorway in the northern bay leading to the stairs for first floor access. The main doorway was originally flanked by two plain pilasters with entablature over that have been removed and the adjoining columns completed. The window frames either side of the main doorway incorporate an arched transom between the casements and smaller upper panes and sashes.

      The two side bays of the frontage were finished as face brickwork panels initially but later were rendered over and painted. A classical cornice across the building at roof level projects forward over the three central bays and has pairs of dentils above the columns. Below the central cornice section there remains indications of the lettering of the bank signage incompletely chiselled off. Over the cornice is a panelled parapet forming a low simple pediment centrally with a tapered flagpole fixed behind.

      Behind the street frontages the first floor of the building is set back from the northern boundary to gain natural light. The two-storeyed rear elevation to Ogden Street is plain and utilitarian without the decorative expression and composition of the front elevation. The rear and visible side walls are of painted render. Steel windows sizes vary according to use and plumbing is externally mounted. A single door, with roller shutter, allows access to the street.

      Information about places in the Queensland Heritage Register is maintained by the Environmental Protection Agency under the Queensland Heritage Act 1992. Information available here is only part of the full Register entry and should not be taken as an official entry. Absence does not mean a particular place is not in the Register.

      Certified copies of the full entries in the Register are available for a fee. You can also search the full Register for a fee to find out if a place or parcel of land is listed or otherwise affected by the Act.

      Last updated: 08 Dec 2006
      Source: http://www.epa.qld.gov.au/projects/heritage/index.cgi?place=602471&back=1
    Occupation  14 May 1923 
    Architect 
    • KIRKPATRICK, JOHN (1856-1923), architect, was born on 12 September 1856 at Albury, New South Wales, first of eight children of John Hunter Kirkpatrick, carpenter from Scotland, and his Bathurst-born wife Margaret, née Jones. His father, influential in the Hume district, used his political connections for his son's benefit when Kirkpatrick commenced practice in Sydney at 17. Like many aspiring architects of the time, he was articled to Edmund Blacket, and worked for him until, energetic and ambitious, he set up his own practice in 1880. At 23 he had already been responsible for constructing approximately fifty-six buildings, including shops and warehouses, housing projects, insurance buildings and Masonic halls. Typical of the period is the famous Carrington Hotel at Katoomba, the first of many hotels he designed.

      Between 1880 and 1890 Kirkpatrick was awarded first premium in at least ten major competitions. His initial success was in a competition for the New Holy Trinity Church at Grenfell. Notable among the commissions he won is the Mutual Life Insurance Co. of New York building, Martin Place, Sydney, constructed in the early 1890s. He completed Sydney Hospital, replacing the original architect, Thomas Rowe, in 1891, and designs for public hospitals at Goulburn and Bathurst followed. In 1887 Sir Henry Parkes, an acquaintance of Kirkpatrick, had held a competition for a state house to be constructed in what was to be called Centennial Park, Sydney, to commemorate the centenary of Australian settlement. Kirkpatrick also won this competition, although because of political wrangling related to the potentially excessive cost the building was never constructed. (Sir) George Dibbs claimed in parliament that although the budget was £150,000 it would finally cost £800,000. £200,000 had already been spent on purchasing the land.

      Kirkpatrick was criticized by fellow architects and others who claimed that he had undue influence among parliamentarians, particularly with the secretary for public works, (Sir) William Lyne, and that this accounted for his uncanny success in acquiring commissions for major public buildings. Parliamentary records indicate that Lyne did indeed give Kirkpatrick exceptional support in the debates related to these buildings. (Sir) John Sulman also recorded his belief that Kirkpatrick systematically corrupted competition judges by withholding repayments on loans.

      On 24 May 1887 in Sydney Kirkpatrick married Annie Elizabeth Douglas Morris; they had nine children, of whom the eldest and youngest sons became architects. Kirkpatrick's practice survived the 1890s depression despite petitions against him in the bankruptcy court. In this period he constructed the original five stands at the Sydney Cricket Ground which are among his finest buildings. He joined the Institute of Architects of New South Wales in 1891 and was a fellow by 1904 but he was never on good terms with the institute.

      In 1894 Kirkpatrick proposed a 'Marine Drive' to run along the foreshores of Port Jackson, preventing waterfront development and preserving a green belt for public use. It never eventuated. In 1903 he was selected as chairman of the royal commission appointed to recommend a site for the national capital. The commission originally recommended the site of Albury but Canberra was later chosen for political reasons. Kirkpatrick was not only closely involved in the initial investigations but, as one of the judges, recommended the acceptance of Walter Burley Griffin's design for the city.

      Kirkpatrick was a cousin of (Sir) Denison Miller, governor of the Commonwealth Bank. When it was decided in 1912 to construct major buildings in each State Kirkpatrick became official bank architect, commencing with the commission, completed in 1916, for the large Commonwealth Bank on the corner of Martin Place and Pitt Street, Sydney. Banks in Melbourne, Newcastle and Geelong followed. Kirkpatrick was also commissioned to design war-service homes and, in partnership with his eldest son Herwald, constructed 1777 houses in all States over three years, from 1918. In 1920 Kirkpatrick recommended that Sydney's Martin Place be widened and extended to Elizabeth Street, culminating in a large war memorial. Although patriotic fervour was strong among Australians wishing to honour their war dead, and the proposal was argued for years after Kirkpatrick's death, the financial implications proved an insurmountable barrier.

      Kirkpatrick died of cancer at Woollahra on 14 May 1923, survived by his wife and children, and was buried in South Head cemetery with Presbyterian forms. His estate was valued for probate at £5944. His practice, continued for a time by Herwald, was later incorporated into the firm of Robertson & (T. J.) Marks, with whom Kirkpatrick had been involved in ventures dating back to 1912. A good, but not exceptionally gifted architect, Kirkpatrick owed his success, extending over forty years and involving several hundred buildings, more to outstanding drive and political connections than to creative skill.
      Select Bibliography

      J. M. Freeland, Architect Extraordinary (Melb, 1970); S. W. Malone, The Life and Work of John Kirkpatrick (B.Arch. Hons thesis, University of New South Wales, 1969). More on the resources

      Author: Stephen Malone

      Print Publication Details: Stephen Malone, 'Kirkpatrick, John (1856 - 1923)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 9, Melbourne University Press, 1983, pp 611-612.

      Source Australian Dictionary of Biography (web links removed)
    Died  14 May 1923  'Logan Brae', Victoria Road, Bellevue Hill, Woollahra, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Cause: Carcinoma of Prostate, Carcinoma of Tonsil 
    • John Kirkpatrick's obituary appeared in all the Sydney newspapers, and included a detailed list of his life's work. The officiating minister said "the deceased was a man, who was without fear, and was possessed of great vision. He saw the future of the City of Sydney and planned accordingly. To-day his monuments are all around. He was a man of direct speech and commanding character; but it was in his own home that his true nature was seen".

      A column appearing in The Sun Newspaper on Monday 14th 1923.

      John Kirkpatrick

      Death This Morning

      Leading Architect

      Designed Commonwealth Bank

      Mr John Kirkpatrick, one of the best known architects in New south Wales, died at his home, "Loganbrae" Victoria Road, Bellevue Hill, early today.

      Mr Kirkpatrick was a native of New South Wales and at the age of 17 was articled to Mr Edmund Thomas Blacket, who was at one time Government Architect in this State, and designed St Andrew's Cathedral and the University buildings.

      Mr Kirkpatrick commenced private practice as an architect at the early age of 23 and had been in practice ever since.

      Among the more notable of the competitions which he won was the design for the State Parliament House. Out of 50 designs sent in, Mr Kirkpatrick secured first prize, and if the work had been proceeded with would according to letters from Sir Henry Parkes, have been appointed the architect.

      Another competition was the Walker Hospital. This was advertised all over the world and again Mr Kirkpatrick was awarded first prize. For the Australian Club six of the principal city architects were invited to submit designs, and Mr Kirkpatrick's was accepted.

      The competition for the Kenmore Asylum building was judged finally by an English expert in London, who awarded Mr Kirkpatrick first place. The Government to the great disappointment of the architect, carried that work out itself but as it was afterwards found that Mr Kirkpatrick's designs had been followed, the board of arbitration awarded him 2,000 pounds compensation.

      Private Residences

      Apart from public buildings he has built some of the finest private residences around Sydney, notably Woollahra House, which cost 40,000 pounds; and Mr Walter Hall's residence said to be, as regards interior features, one of the finest houses in Australia. Besides, he has built many business warehouses and store in the city.

      He was entrusted with the work of building the Commonwealth Bank which stands as an everlasting monument to his craftsmanship.

      Mr Kirkpatrick was also engaged in building war service homes; and he also rebuilt Menzie's Hotel, Melbourne and built the Queensland National Bank.

      Mr Kirkpatrick belonged to one of the oldest and most distinguished of Scottish families whose records are brimful of adventure and tragedy. His grandfather was the late Robert Kirkpatrick, Closeburn, Dumfriesshire, who was the grandson of Sir James Kirkpatrick, fourth baronet.

      Mr Kirkpatrick is survived by a widow, six daughters and three sons. The funeral will leave his late residence at 10:30 a.m. to-morrow for the South Head Cemetery.
    Mr John Kirkpatrick
    Mr John Kirkpatrick
    The Sydney Morning Herald Tuesday 15 May 1923
    Mr John Kirkpatrick
    Mr John Kirkpatrick
    The Sydney Morning Herald Tuesday 15 May 1923
    Mr John Kirkpatrick
    Mr John Kirkpatrick
    The Sydney Morning Herald Tuesday 15 May 1923
    Buried  15 May 1923  South Head Cemetery, Woollahra, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • John Kirkpatrick's obituary appeared in all the Sydney newspapers, and included a detailed list of his life's work. The officiating minister said "the deceased was a man, who was without fear, and was possessed of great vision. He saw the future of the City of Sydney and planned accordingly. To-day his monuments are all around. He was a man of direct speech and commanding character; but it was in his own home that his true nature was seen".
      ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      The Sun Newspaper 14/5/1923?

      John Kirkpatrick

      Death This Morning

      Leading Architect

      Designed Commonwealth Bank

      Mr John Kirkpatrick, one of the best known architects in New south Wales, died at his home, "Loganbrae" Vctoria Road, Bellevue Hill, early today.

      Mr Kirkpatrick was a native of New South Wales and at the age of 17 was articled to Mr Edmund Thomas Blacket, who was at one time Government Architest in this State, and designed St Andrew's Cathedral and the University buildings.

      Mr Kirkpatrick commenced private practice as an architect at the early age of 23 and had been in practice ever since.

      Among the more notable of the competitions which he won was the design for the State Parliament House. Out of 50 designs sent in, Mr Kirkpatrick secured first prize, and if the work had been proceeded with would according to letters from Sir Henry Parkes, have been appointed the architect.

      Another competition was the Walker Hospital. This was advertised all over the world and again Mr Kirkpatrick was awarded first prize. For the Australian Club six of the principal city architects were invited to submit designs, and Mr Kirkpatrick's was accepted.

      The competition for the Kenmore Asylum building was judged finally by an English expert in London, who awarded Mr Kirkpatrick first place. The Government to the great disappointment of the architect, carried that work out itself but as it was afterwards found that Mr Kirkpatrick's designs had been followed, the board of arbitration awarded him 2,000 pounds compensation.

      Private Residences

      Apart from public buildings he has built some of the finest private residences around Sydney, notably Woollahra House, which cost 40,000 pounds; and Mr Walter Hall's residence said to be, as regards interior features, one of the finest houses in Australia. Besides, he has built many business warehouses and store in the city.

      He was entrusted with the work of building the Commonwealth Bank which stands as an everlasting monument to his craftsmanship.

      Mr Kirkpatrick was also engaged in building war service homes; and he also rebuilt Menzie's Hotel, Melbourne and built the Queensland National Bank.

      Mr Kirkpatrick belonged to one of the oldest and most distinguished of Scottish families whose records are brimful of adventure and tragedy. His grandfather was the late Robert Kirkpatrick, Closeburn, Dumfriesshire, who was the grandson of Sir James Kirkpatrick, fourth baronet.

      Mr Kirkpatrick is survived by a widow, six daughters and three sons. The funeral will leave his late residence at 10:30 a.m. to-morrow for the South Head Cemetery.
    Occupation  6 Aug 1971 
    Architect (deceased) 
    Person ID  I3128  1. Essex Ennevers
    Last Modified  19 Aug 2010 

    Father  John Hunter KIRKPATRICK,   Born:  Abt 1829, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   Died:  4 Dec 1911, Waverley, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother  Margaret Anne JONES,   Born:  1833/4, Bathurst, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   Died:  10 Jul 1908 
    Married  1855  New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID  F2098  Family Group Sheet

    Family (spouse)  Annie Elizabeth Douglas MORRIS,   Born:  1869, Balmain, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   Died:  6 Aug 1936, 'Selsdon', 16 Macleay Street, Potts Point, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  24 May 1887  Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Lily Eugenie KIRKPATRICK,   Born:  1888, Canterbury, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   Died:  28 Apr 1950, Blair Park, Crozet, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
     2. Marguerite F KIRKPATRICK,   Born:  1889, St Leonards, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   Died:  27 Feb 1953, Montréal, Quebec, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. Herwald Gordon KIRKPATRICK,   Born:  1891, St Leonards, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   Died:  26 Sep 1951, Battersea District, London Find all individuals with events at this location
     4. Evelyn Hilda KIRKPATRICK,   Born:  1894, Burwood, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   Died:  Yes, date unknown
     5. John Hunter KIRKPATRICK,   Born:  Abt Dec 1895, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   Died:  6 Aug 1971, Scottish Hospital, Paddington, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location
     6. Vere KIRKPATRICK,   Born:  1898, Strathfield, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   Died:  9 Jul 1926, 'Mount View', Victoria Road, Bellevue Hill, Woollahra, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location
     7. Roger Douglas KIRKPATRICK,   Born:  4 Aug 1900, Strathfield, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   Died:  23 Feb 1966, Parramatta, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location
     8. Dorothy KIRKPATRICK,   Born:  1 Jan 1903,   Died:  5 Dec 1928, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
     9. Marjorie KIRKPATRICK,   Born:  1 Jan 1903,   Died:  Yes, date unknown
    Family ID  F955  Family Group Sheet

  • Event Map

    (nb pins may represent approximate locations)
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 12 Sep 1856 - Albury, New South Wales, Australia Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 24 May 1887 - Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLiving - 28 Apr 1920 - 'Logan Brae', Victoria Road, Bellevue Hill, Woollahra, New South Wales, Australia Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Cause: Carcinoma of Prostate, Carcinoma of Tonsil - 14 May 1923 - 'Logan Brae', Victoria Road, Bellevue Hill, Woollahra, New South Wales, Australia Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - 15 May 1923 - South Head Cemetery, Woollahra, New South Wales, Australia Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photographs
    Judge John Kirkpatrick (1856-1923)
    Judge John Kirkpatrick (1856-1923)
    Source: National Library of Australia
    John Kirkpatrick (1856-1923)
    John Kirkpatrick (1856-1923)

    Family histories
    Well-known family members
    Well-known family members
    All family members who I have found featured in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography or its Australian equivalent, Who's Who 2008 or with an obituary in The Times.


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