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Ennever & Enever family history & ancestry. Click here to return to the home page WJ Ennever (1869-1947). From the portrait by J Seymour R.A., exhibited in the Royal Academy.

Thomas TADMAN

Thomas TADMAN

Male Abt 1836 - 1903  (~ 67 years)

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  • Name Thomas TADMAN 
    Born Abt 1836  Newington, Surrey Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Christened 20 Aug 1837  St John Horsleydown, Bermondsey, Surrey Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Census 1 Jun 1841  Kent Street, Newington, Surrey Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Occupation 1851 
    Patten Maker 
    Census 1 Apr 1851  276 Kent Street, Newington, Surrey Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Criminal 15 Jun 1857  Newington, Surrey Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Convicted of larceny 
    Thomas Tadman (1836-1903)
    Thomas Tadman (1836-1903)
    Criminal Register
    Living 25 Aug 1862  Union Street, Lambeth, Surrey Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Occupation 25 Aug 1862 
    Clog Maker 
    Criminal 13 Aug 1866  Old Bailey, London Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Acquitted of uttering counterfeit coin 
    • Trial details not found.
    Thomas Tadman (1836-1903)
    Thomas Tadman (1836-1903)
    Criminal Register
    Occupation 1871 
    Undertaker 
    Census 1 Apr 1871  486 Cable Street, Shadwell, London Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • THE HISTORY OF A & C TADMAN FUNERAL DIRECTORS

      Tadman Funeral Directors was originally conceived from the love of horses of the great-great-grandfather of one of the current directors of the company, Tim Tadman.

      Wag Tadman was a horse trader working from his home in Bale in Norfolk. He imported Friesian horses from Belgium, trained them to pull a glass hearse and then sold them to the Funeral Trade, mainly in the London Area. He, and his wife Dorcas, moved to Stepney, East London in 1849, and slowly built a thriving funeral business. After their deaths, their son Alfred William and his wife Annie continued to run the business successfully. He became a well known personality in the East End of London, not only as a Funeral Director, but also for his knowledge of Belgian Black Horses, which are the breed still used for the Horse Drawn Funerals.

      After Alfred William's death in 1935, his widow Annie and sons Alf and Con, added to the reputation of the family business and when Alf died in1980, Con went into partnership with his son Gordon. Towards the latter part of the 1990's, Gordon's wife Maureen and son Tim took the reins. Gordon sadly passed away in 2006.

      A new branch was opened in Bethnal Green in 1998 and now the branch in Kings Langley has been added to the family business. This branch is the venture of Tim Tadman, who lives locally and plays for Kings Langley Cricket Club,To maintain the family connection, the Kings Langley branch is managed by Marian Stavrou, Tim's mother-in-law, who has lived and worked in the area for over 30 years.

      This Independent and Family Owned Funeral Directors offers a Personal and Professional service in the traditional manner to the local community and surrounding villages and towns. This includes specialist Horse Drawn Carriage Funerals, Saab limousines, a 24-hour service, Private Chapels of Rest, Repatriation to any Country and any Denominations included.

      A Wedding Carriage Service is also available with a genuine Landau or Limousines.

      We have recently become first call for TV programmes Eastenders and Londons Burning, Bad Girls, Holby City, Silent Witness, Trial & Retribution & Spooks.

      If you would like any further information please telephone 01923 264296 and we will ensure complete Funeral Arrangements carried out with dignity.

      Source: www.actadman.co.uk
    Criminal 10 Jul 1871  Old Bailey, London Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin 
    • 571. THOMAS TADMAN (30) , Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin.

      MESSRS. POLAND and O'CONNELL conducted the Prosecution; and MR. RIBTON

      the Defence.

      MARY ROBBIE . I am a widow, and keep a corn-chandler's shop at Stepney Green—on 31st May, about 8 o'clock at night, I served the prisoner with a truss of straw, a truss of hay, a truss of clover, and a bushel of oats—they came to 11s., 9d.—he gave me a half-sovereign and a florin, and I gave him 3d. change—he took the goods away in his cart, and about three minutes after he had gone, I found the half-sovereign was bad—I kept it in my hand, and sent my lad to find the cart, but be could not, and I put the coin in a cupboard, and afterwards took it to the Police Court—I there saw the prisoner in a cell, with three more, and picked him out—he was not pointed out to me in any way—a man without an arm was in the cart with the prisoner, and another man held the horse.

      Cross-examined. He was from five to ten minutes in the house—the gas had just been lighted—my lad assisted in putting the things into the cart—I had no other half-sovereign—the prisoner wore a high hat when he came, and I told the policeman so—I did not see a high hat on any of the other men in the cell—it was not the hat which drew my attention, I recognized the man's features—I did not say before the Magistrate that I could not recognize him till he put his hat on, but he put on his hat, and I said he was the man—I did not say before the Magistrate that I could not identify him unless his hat was on.

      Re-examined. I recognized him by his features, and by his hat, too—he had a hat in the cell—I think I should have recognized him if he had been without his hat—I never failed to recognize him without his hat—I did not see him without it till he was at the bar—it is not correct that I failed to recognize him till he put it on—he bad it on when I went to the cell door—I have not the least doubt about him.

      THOMAS HENRY BEALAND . I am fifteen years old, and am servant to Mrs. Robbie—on 31st May, in the evening, I helped the prisoner to put some hay and oats into his cart, and he put the clover in—two other persons were with him—he had a black horse in his cart.

      Cross-examined. I was taken by a constable to the prisoner's cell, and said, at first, that I could not identify him—three other gentlemen were in the cell with him, and were brought out with him—I could not pick him out—I think the others had their hats on; I am not quite sure—the other three had round hats on—they were all of a row—one of the policemen did not nudge me, and say "Go on, pick him out"—I told the policeman outside, a second time, that I could not pick him out, and I did not do so at all—I think the prisoner is the man—I walked away without saying whether he was the man or not—I told them I did not know anyone there—I next saw him at the Police Court.

      LYDIA BAGGARLY . My husband keeps the Hand in Hand, New Kent Road—on 2nd June, a little after 6 o'clock, I served the prisoner with a pint of ale—he laid down a good sovereign—I went up stairs to a drawer in my bedroom, and took out a half-sovereign, and 10s., in silver—I left another half-sovereign there—I have one key of the drawer, and my husband another—no one else has a key—I went down, and gave the prisoner the half-sovereign, and 9s., 6d. in silver, and then went to the till, and gave him 3d. in coppers—he then asked me if I would give him all silver—I said "Yes"—he laid a half-sovereign on the counter—I took it up—it felt
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      very slippery—I weighed it, and found it bad—I took it into the bar-parlour, and said to my husband "You must either have taken this bad half-sovereign, or this man has changed it"—the girl, Elizabeth Stevens, then took it, and said "Let me look at it"—I did not see her give it to my husband—the prisoner said "I have not touched the money"—my husband said to me "I can take an oath that you could not have given that half-sovereign to the man"—I don't believe it was the same half-sovereign that I had brought down and given to the prisoner—I had not noticed that the one I gave him was slippery.

      Cross-examined. I do not say it is not the same, because it is bad—we never take any gold without weighing it, therefore it cannot have been the same—my husband had taken it—I cannot say when there was only one other sovereign in the drawer, and no sovereigns—there were other people in the shop who said they had not seen him touch the half-sovereign—the counter was not wet with beer where he stood—that was the only part that was dry—a man named Burridge, an undertaker, lives near us—two of his men came in—I do not know that the prisoner had been at Burridge's, looking after a horse—he had a horse and trap at the door—he is, I believe, an undertaker—he might have been in the house twenty minutes.

      ELIZABETH STEVENS . I am Mrs. Baggarly's servant—I saw the prisoner there on 2nd June, my mistress brought in a half-sovereign and was going to put it on the table, I asked her to let me look at it, and she gave it into my hand, I put it between my teeth and found it was bad, I gave it to my master—it had not gone out of my possession.

      GEORGE BAGGARLY . I remember the night—the prisoner was at my house—there is a drawer up stairs where I kept money, of which I have one key, and my wife the other—there were two half-sovereigns—I had taken them, and passed them—I am quite sure they were good—I was called up from the cellar into the parlour—the girl handed me a half-sovereign—I saw the prisoner there, and my wife said "You have either taken a bad half-sovereign, or else this man has changed it—I put it on the scale and found it light—I told the prisoner I should detain him; he said if I gave him in charge he would make me pay for it, for he had plenty of money—I sent for a policeman—the prisoner said he would drive me to the station if I liked—he seemed anxious to get out, but I stood by the door—he said he thought he was as good a man as I was, and we had better come and settle it outside—I declined—he said he should not stop any longer, pushed me from the door, jumped up in his cart, and without stopping for his carter to get in, drove away as hard as he could—I ran after him, halloaing, "Stop him," but he whipped the horse all the way—two boys ran after him, and he tried to slash them with the whip—a policeman came—a young man stopped him, and he walked back with the policeman to my house—I showed the policeman the half-sovereign—the prisoner said "Let us look at it," and took hold of it—he put it in his mouth, and said "I could swallow it if I liked"—he appeared to swallow something, and I believe he swallowed the good one—he then offered me ten shillings not to give him a showing up—I gave him in custody, with the half-sovereign—he had a black horse, and I believe he is an undertaker—he offered at the station to give me a half-sovereign or a sovereign, not to charge him.

      Cross-examined. I did not say before the Magistrate that he offered me a sovereign, I did not think of it—I have not talked about it to any policeman—there was only two half-sovereigns in my drawer, as I had paid away
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      all the gold I had on Tuesday—I took these two half-sovereigns of two of the neighbour's children, at different times, one of whom I can recollect by name—I never take coin without weighing it, and I weighed these—I have not made inquiry of the children, because the coins I took were good.

      ROBERT ATKINSON (Policeman P 365). I was called, and saw the prisoner in a cart in Wellington Street, galloping, and beating the horse with a whip—a crowd gathered round, calling "Stop thief!"—he was stopped, and the prosecutor charged him, and I took him back to the shop—I looked at the half-sovereign and found it bad—the prisoner asked to look at it—I let him do so—he threw his hand up to his mouth, and handed back a bad half-sovereign—I did not see anything go into his mouth, but I saw him swallowing afterwards—he said he would give Mr. Baggarly a half-sovereign to settle it—I searched him at the station, and found 19s., 9d. in good money—there was not a dent on the half-sovereign when I was examined at the Police Court, it has been made since.

      Cross-examined. The horse was going as fast as he could—the dent in the half-sovereign was done when it was marked at the station.

      WILLIAM MASON (Police Inspector M) On 2nd June I was at the station when the prisoner was brought in—he said to Mr. Baggarly "I will give you ten shillings or a sovereign not to charge me"—Mr. Baggarly said that he should, and the prisoner said "If you book this charge against me I shall hold you responsible"—after the adjournment on the 14th Mrs. Robbie saw the prisoner with four others in a cell at the Police Court—she at once went up to him, placed her hand on him and said "That is the man"—she gave me this half-sovereign on the 14th.

      Cross-examined. She said nothing before she identified him about his having a high hat, but she did after she came out of the cell—there were four others in the cell, not three only—most of them had billycock hats—he was I think the only one with a high hat—she did not tell me before she identified him that he had a high hat, or that she could not identify him unless he put his hat on—the Magistrate did not order him in my presence to put his hat on—but I was not in Court all the time—I don't know who the other men were, they were in charge—the boy failed altogether to pick him out, though they were brought out of the cell.

      WILLIAM JOHN WEBSTER . These two half-sovereigns are bad, and from the same mould,; they are both light.

      Witnesses for the Defence.

      GEORGE DOUGHTY . I am a general contractor in the building trade, of 8, Globe Road, Bethnal Green—I have know the prisoner seven or eight years, he is an undertaker at Shadwell—I have always known him to be respectable—he has buried several of my relatives, which caused me to know him—on 31st May, he was in my company for three hours, from 5.45 or 6.15 in the evening till past 9 o'clock—it was then dark—I went with him to look at his stable at Shadwell, about some repairs he wanted me to do, it is seven or eight minutes' walk from his house—we remained at the stable three-quarters of an hour, I then went to my house; we parted just before dusk, before 9 o'clock—I was not at his house at all—we were at my house an hour and three-quarters or two hours, talking, before we went to the stable—I know it was 31st May from being at home for my holiday, I was not transacting any business—it was Tuesday evening in Whitsun week—I saw by the papers last Sunday week that he was in custody.

      Cross-examined by MR. POLAND. He is not a particular friend of mine,
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      only in the way of business—I did nothing at the stable, I could not come to terms with him—I saw it in the Weekly Dispatch or Lloyd's—the prisoner's father ascertained from my brother where I lived, as he did not know, and he asked me if I knew what evening it was Mr. Tadman had been to my house—that was after I saw it in the newspaper—I did not come forward when I saw it in the newspaper, I was too busy, but the father came to me—my wife was at home, she came here with me to-day, but whether she is here now I don't know—I keep no servant; my daughters were out—the prisoner walked to me—you can go from my house to some parts of Stepney Green in about fifteen minutes—it took us half an hour and five minutes to walk to the prisoner's stable—the prisoner has never had penal servitude, on my oath—I know nothing about his committing a watch robbery—he has never been in unlawful possession of a decanter—his father is not a friend of mine, he is here.

      Re-examined. My wife opened the door to the prisoner, but she was not with us all the time.

      COURT. Q. You saw the stable, do you know what animal he keeps there? A. A black funeral horse, and a funeral carriage—he keeps no private trap.

      John Turner, a gentleman's servant;. Joseph Goodfellow, an undertaker; Mary McFarlane, a shop keeper; and John Vicars, a servant, gave the prisoner a good character.

      MR. POLAND called

      EDWARD DILLON (Police Sergeant A 19). I have known the prisoner since 1862, when he came out of prison, after having four years—I had him in custody in January, 1864—I have known him up to the present time—he lives not very far from our station."

      Cross-examined. He had four years' penal servitude, and I can tell you some more, if you wish to know it.

      MARY ROBBIE (re-called). The Magistrate asked me what sort of a hat he wore—I said I did not know the names of hats, and he told the prisoner to put his hat on—I then said that that was the sort of hat he wore.

      GUILTY — Twelve Months' Imprisonment.
    Thomas Tadman (c1836-1903)
    Thomas Tadman (c1836-1903)
    Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin. Old Bailey, London.
    p1
    Thomas Tadman (c1836-1903)
    Thomas Tadman (c1836-1903)
    Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin. Old Bailey, London.
    p2
    Thomas Tadman (c1836-1903)
    Thomas Tadman (c1836-1903)
    Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin. Old Bailey, London.
    p3
    Thomas Tadman (c1836-1903)
    Thomas Tadman (c1836-1903)
    Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin. Old Bailey, London.
    p4
    Occupation 1881 
    Undertaker 
    Census 1 Apr 1881  486 Cable Street, Shadwell, London Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Informant 18 Sep 1889 
    Death of his father. 
    • Present at the death at 422 Cable Street.
      His wife, Phoebe, died the following day.
    Living 18 Sep 1889  422 Cable Street, Shadwell, London Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Occupation 1891 
    Undertaker 
    Census 1 Apr 1891  422 Cable Street, Shadwell, London Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Birthplace recorded as Essex.
    Living 16 Jun 1892  St Peter, Stepney, London Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Occupation 16 Jun 1892 
    Undertaker 
    Misc 13 Nov 1893  Old Bailey, London Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Edward Gardner charged with robbery with violence on Thomas Tadman 
    • 26. EDWARD GARDNER (24) , Robbery, with others, with violence, on Thomas Tadman, and stealing a watch and chain, his property.

      MR. WOODGATE Prosecuted, and MR. BURNIE Defended.

      THOMAS TADMAN . I am an undertaker, of 422, Cable Street—on August 29th, about nine p.m., I was in Johnson Street, and the prisoner, whom I knew by sight, snatched my watch, and said, "Give me that"—he ran across the street—I ran after him, and got hold of him by his coat, and a man rushed up and said, "If you don't leave go of him I will stick a knife into you"—I let go, and he ran across the street—I ran after him, and when I got to the corner of the street I was knocked down on my knees by a tall man, the one who had threatened me with the knife—I jumped up, and called "Stop thief!" and ran after the prisoner, and when I got to the corner of Thomas Street three or four men said, "Knock the old b——down and kill him"—the prisoner was not with those men; he was running in front—I got up again, and found my arm bleeding—it was broken by a kick when I was down, and was trying to save my head—I went to the hospital—I knew the prisoner, because he came and asked me to go bail for his brother the Sessions before last, who got five years' penal servitude—I came here on purpose to look for him, when his brother was here, and saw him in a public—house opposite this Court, and gave him in custody—when he was in custody he wanted to shake hands and said, "Mr. Tadman, I would not rob you of your watch."

      Cross-examined. He never said, "You have got the wrong man," nor did I say so before the Magistrate—I did not know his name or address when the robbery was committed—I did not know that the other man was his brother, or that his name was Gardner—I went with him to a beer—house with a man named Eccleston—I told the policeman he might be found at 'Eccleston's, not the same night—I did not see Smith till I came out of the hospital—I went to Eccleston's two nights, and had police all round the place—Johnson Street leads from Commercial Road into Cable Street—this robbery took place close to our coach—house—I was going home—Mrs. Le Fevre was with me, and must have seen my watch snatched—this happened near a lamp—the prisoner would never have got away from me if it had not been for the man breaking my arm—Mrs. Le Fevre did not run with me; she was frightened, and was in bed next day—I do not know a Mrs. Stephenson—I did not send her to the station to identify the prisoner, nor Mrs. Le Fevre, nor any woman—Thursby works for my wife—I did not ask him to go to the station to identify the prisoner, but the police did—my wife has done several things for Mrs. Neendroff, but she is not dependent upon her—I did not say to Smith, the officer, "Whoever is brought in will be identified"—I went to draw £18 out—I did not get till ten minutes to nine at the George Public—house—I did not go into the George—I am not a teetotaler; I had twopenny worth of whisky with Mrs. Le Fevre, but I had nothing between 7.30 and then.

      Re-examined. There is no ground for suggesting that I was drunk; I had to do our stables afterwards—I knew that Gardner was the name of the man I was asked to be bail for, but I did not know the prisoner was his brother till afterwards.

      HENRY JAMES THURSBY . I live at 423, Cable Street, and am in Mr. Tadman's employ—on August 29th, at nine p.m., I heard a cry of "Stopthief!" and the prisoner ran almost into my arms, and turned round and stumbled as he came, and then turned back again—about a fortnight afterwards I saw him at the station with fifteen or sixteen other men, and identified him—I knew his face the moment I saw him.

      Cross-examined. On the Tuesday night Mr. Tadman said, "We have got the chap who took my watch; I want you to go to—night and identify him"—I described the man who ran into my arms to the police, as about my height, hardly as tall, slight moustache, and a light jacket buttoned up, or a guernsey.

      By the COURT. I told Mr. Tadman that I had seen the man, and he asked me to identify him—I saw Mr. Tadman in the hospital.

      ANN NEENDROFF . On August 29th I was living at Dr. Barnardo's, in Dock Street, and about nine p.m. I heard a cry of "Stop thief!"—I saw a man run out of Short Street towards the railway arch; he stumbled and fell on his right knee—I put my hand on his shoulder, and somebody called out, "Look out, missis; he has got a knife!"—I saw his face—he got away from me, as I had a baby in my arms—Mr. Tadman came to the corner, and the man jumped up and went across the street—I after-wards picked him out from a lot of others at the Police—station; the prisoner is the man.

      Cross-examined. I hesitated because I did not see any cuff, or anything round his neck, but I was certain of his features—I am certain of him now; the more I see him in the dock the more certain I get—this all happened in a moment—I go to Mrs. Tadman's every day; she has been very kind to me as regards my little boy, but my husband supports me.

      Re-examined. The prisoner looked up in my face, and he was very white, like a corpse when I saw him at the station he was dressed like a gentleman, but he had no cutis or collar on.

      WILLIAM SMITH (Police—Sergeant II). I found the prisoner detained at Bridewell Police—station—I told him the charge—he said nothing, but afterwards he said, "I would not do such a thing to Mr. Tadmun; he came to bail my brother out the other day. I was at Charley Elphinstone's the other evening, and we talked about my brother being stabbed"—he was taken to the station and identified by four witnesses.

      Cross-examined. Mrs. Neendroff hesitated—Mrs. Stephenson and her daughter failed to identify him—on September 6th Tadman said, "Who ever is brought in will be identified," but I did not take much notice of what he said, because he was under the influence of drink—he could speak, but he was very excited.

      HERBERT CHARLES ELSMORE . I am a hospital surgeon—I was on duty on August 29th, when Tadman was brought in—he had a compound fracture of the right fore—arm; both bones were broken across, and there was a small wound in the skin by the bone coming through it, and bruising on the back of his arm by his elbow—the injuries were serious; he was under my treatment about a week, and then he was sent to the out-patients' department—I do not think he will have the use of his hand again.

      Cross-examined. The injuries might have been caused by a fall.

      THOMAS TADMAN (Re-examined). I am married—my wife had seen the prisoner when he came to me about being bail for his brother—I first identified him in the public—house in the Old Bailey—my wife was with me; she had been out four days, looking for him—it was in consequence of something she said that I went to the public—house to find him—while I was in the hospital I made a communication to my wife as to who the man was who took my watch.

      GUILTY .

      He then PLEADED GUILTY** to a conviction at Chelmsford on October 15th, 1890, of robbery from the person.— Eighteen Months Hard Labour.
    Thomas Tadman (c1836-1903)
    Thomas Tadman (c1836-1903)
    Old Bailey p1
    Thomas Tadman (c1836-1903)
    Thomas Tadman (c1836-1903)
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    Thomas Tadman (c1836-1903)
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    Misc 2 Apr 1894  Old Bailey, London Find all individuals with events at this location 
    George Elliott charged with violence and stealing 
    • 362. GEORGE ELLIOTT (30) , Robbery with violence, with Edward Gardner and other persons unknown, on Thomas Tadman, and stealing a watch, his property.

      MR. SHERWOOD Prosecuted, and MR. PURCELL Defended.

      THOMAS TADMAN . I am' an undertaker and jobmaster, of 422, Cable Street, Shad well—on August 29th, at 8.45 p.m., I was near the railway arch in Johnson Street, and saw five men—the prisoner was one of them—I have known him a long while, and have drank with him, and you tried Gardner and gave him five years; he wanted me to be bail for him—I had a gold lever watch, value £20, and a big Albert chain, and one of them, Gardner, said, "Give me this; if you don't, I will murder you"—I got knocked on my hands and knees by a man named Soldier, and kicked—I let go and they ran away—I called "Stop thief!" and when I got into the next street they knocked me down again, and the prisoner kicked me and broke my arm in two places—I halloaed "Stop thief"—I went to the London Hospital, and they told me I should have to have my arm taken off—I was an in-patient about a fortnight, and two portions of bone were removed—I cannot use my arm now; I cannot bend it—I continued an out-patient three months—there was a lamp—I have not seen my watch since—on October 5th, about ten a.m., my wife was driving me in the Mile End Road, and I saw the prisoner and said, "That is the man I want"—he went up one street and down another, and when he got to Jack's Hill, where a lot of bad characters live, he gave a parcel to someone and ran away, and I lost sight of him—I saw him again in the Commercial Road, and not again till I saw him at Dalston Station about six weeks ago with about twenty others, and I identified him—I said, "You know me, Joe"—he looked at me and said nothing.

      Cross-examined. Mrs. Le Fevre was with me when I was robbed; I had been with her about a quarter of an hour—I never go to the George Public-house—I gave evidence against Gardner on November 15th—I never said, "I did not get to the George till ten minutes to nine. I did not go into the George; I am not a teetotaler. I had two-pennywort of whisky with Mrs. Le Fevre"—if I stated that, and it was taken down by the shorthand writer and printed in the Sessions Paper, it was a mistake—Gardner ran away into Thursby's arms—there was a witness who lives at Dr. Bernardo's who saw a man running—Mrs. Le Fevre is not here, nor is Henry James Thursby or Ann Newdrop—Johnson Street, where I was robbed, is a very lonely street, all private houses, and the only light was from the lamp—I should have had all the men that night if I could have got out of the hospital—I know Gardner's brother—I was asked to be bail for him, but I refused—that was at the Mansion House—it came here, and I saw Gardner in a public-house outside this Court—I did not mention when Gardner was tried that one of the men was George Elliott—that is not the prisoner's right name—his wife told me his right name—I saw her yesterday—when he was in custody I had told the police that I knew him by sight, and they placed him with nineteen strangers—I did not know anything about them—I am quite sure the prisoner is one of the men who robbed me—I am quite sure he kicked my arm and broke it in two places—when I was attacked I ran after my watch, and lost sight of Mrs. Le Fevre.

      Re-examined. I was in the habit of seeing the men at a beershop, and that is where they spotted my watch—the Gardners were there, and another one who has got fifteen months—I was in the habit of seeing Gardner—I buried his father-in-law.

      By the COURT. Between August 9th and the time the prisoner was taken, excepting the time he ran away, I could never find him in any of the places where I used to see him; he left all those places.

      WILLIAM KEMP (Policeman). I was present when Tadman identified the prisoner—he picked him out from ten or twelve others—he touched him and said, "That is the man."

      The prisoner's statement before the Magistrate: "I can produce plenty of witnesses to prove where I was that night."

      GUILTY .
    Thomas Tadman (c1836-1903)
    Thomas Tadman (c1836-1903)
    Old Bailey p1
    Thomas Tadman (c1836-1903)
    Thomas Tadman (c1836-1903)
    Old Bailey p2
    Thomas Tadman (c1836-1903)
    Thomas Tadman (c1836-1903)
    Old Bailey p3
    Misc 3 Apr 1894  Central Criminal Court, London Find all individuals with events at this location 


    • CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT

      Sessions Paper.

      TYLER, MAYOR.

      SIXTH SESSION, HELD APRIL 2ND, 1894.

      MINUTES OF EVIDENCE,

      TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY

      JAMES DROVER BARNETT

      AND

      ALEXANDER BUCKLER,

      Short-hand Writers to the Court,

      ROLLS CHAMBERS, No. 89, CHANCERY LANE.

      THE POINTS OF LAW AND PRACTICE

      REVISED AND EDITED BY

      EDWARD T. E. BESLEY, ESQ.,

      OF THE MIDDLE TEMPLE, BARRISTER-AT-LAW.

      LONDON:

      STEVENS AND SONS, LIMITED, 119, CHANCERY LANE,

      Law Booksellers and Publishers.
      See original Click to see original

      THE

      WHOLE PROCEEDINGS

      On the Queen's Commission of

      OYER AND TERMINER AND GAOL DELIVERY

      FOR

      The City of London,

      AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE

      COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX AND THE PARTS OF THE COUNTIES OF ESSEX, KENT, AND SURREY, WITHIN THE JURISDICTION

      OF THE

      CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT,

      Held on Monday, April 2nd, 1894, and following days.

      BEFORE the RIGHT HON. GEORGE ROBERT TYLER, LORD MAYOR of the City of London; the Hon. Sir WILLIAM RANN KENNEDY, Knt., one of the Justices of Her Majesty's High Court of Justice; Sir JOHN WHITTAKER ELLIS, Bart., and Sir JOSEPH SAVORY , Bart, M. P., Aldermen of the said City; Sir CHARLES HALL , Q.C., M.P., K.C.M.G., Recorder of the said City; Col. Sir WALTER WILKIN , Knt., Lieut.-Col. HORATIO DAVID DAVIES , Esq., FRANK GREEN , Esq., MARCUS SAMUEL , Esq., WALTER VAUGHAN MORGAN , Esq., and WILLIAM PURDIE TRELOAR, Esq., Aldermen of the said City; and Sir FORREST FULTON, Knt., Q.C., Common Serjeant of the said City; Her Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer and General Gaol Delivery, holden for the said City, and Judges of the Central Criminal Court.

      JOHN VOCE MOORE, Esq., Alderman.

      JOSEPH COCKFIELD DIMSDALE, Esq., Alderman.

      Sheriffs.

      THOMAS BEARD , Esq.

      CLARENCE R. HALSE, Esq.

      Under-Sheriffs.
      See original Click to see original

      CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

      TYLER, MAYOR. SIXTH SESSION.

      A star (*) denotes that prisoners have been previously in custody—two stars (**) that they have been more than once in custody—a dagger (†) that they are known to be the associates of bad characters—the figures after the name in the indictment denote the prisoner's age.

      LONDON AND MIDDLESEX CASES.

      OLD COURT.—Monday, April 2nd, 1894.

      Before Mr. Recorder.


      Reference Number: t18940402-362

      362. GEORGE ELLIOTT (30) , Robbery with violence, with Edward Gardner and other persons unknown, on Thomas Tadman, and stealing a watch, his property.
      See original Click to see original

      MR. SHERWOOD Prosecuted, and MR. PURCELL Defended.

      THOMAS TADMAN . I am' an undertaker and jobmaster, of 422, Cable Street, Shad well—on August 29th, at 8.45 p.m., I was near the railway arch in Johnson Street, and saw five men—the prisoner was one of them—I have known him a long while, and have drank with him, and you tried Gardner and gave him five years; he wanted me to be bail for him—I had a gold lever watch, value £20, and a big Albert chain, and one of them, Gardner, said, "Give me this; if you don't, I will murder you"—I got knocked on my hands and knees by a man named Soldier, and kicked—I let go and they ran away—I called "Stop thief!" and when I got into the next street they knocked me down again, and the prisoner kicked me and broke my arm in two places—I halloaed "Stop thief"—I went to the London Hospital, and they told me I should have to have my arm taken off—I was an in-patient about a fortnight, and two portions of bone were removed—I cannot use my arm now; I cannot bend it—I continued an out-patient three months—there was a lamp—I have not seen my watch since—on October 5th, about ten a.m., my wife was driving me in the Mile End Road, and I saw the prisoner and said, "That is the man I want"—he went up one street and down another, and when he got to Jack's Hill, where a lot of bad characters live, he gave a parcel to someone and ran away, and I lost sight of him—I saw him again in the Commercial Road, and not again till I saw him at Dalston Station about six weeks ago with about twenty others, and I identified him—I said, "You know me, Joe"—he looked at me and said nothing.

      Cross-examined. Mrs. Le Fevre was with me when I was robbed; I had been with her about a quarter of an hour—I never go to the George Public-house—I gave evidence against Gardner on November 15th—I never said, "I did not get to the George till ten minutes to nine. I did not go into the George; I am not a teetotaler. I had two-pennywort of whisky with Mrs. Le Fevre"—if I stated that, and it was taken down by the shorthand writer and printed in the Sessions Paper, it was a mistake—Gardner ran away into Thursby's arms—there was a witness who lives at Dr. Bernardo's who saw a man running—Mrs. Le Fevre is not here, nor is Henry James Thursby or Ann Newdrop—Johnson Street, where I was robbed, is a very lonely street, all private houses, and the only light was from the lamp—I should have had all the men that night if I could have got out of the hospital—I know Gardner's brother—I was asked to be bail for him, but I refused—that was at the Mansion House—it came here, and I saw Gardner in a public-house outside this Court—I did not mention when Gardner was tried that one of the men was George Elliott—that is not the prisoner's right name—his wife told me his right name—I saw her yesterday—when he was in custody I had told the police that I knew him by sight, and they placed him with nineteen strangers—I did not know anything about them—I am quite sure the prisoner is one of the men who robbed me—I am quite sure he kicked my arm and broke it in two places—when I was attacked I ran after my watch, and lost sight of Mrs. Le Fevre.

      Re-examined. I was in the habit of seeing the men at a beershop, and that is where they spotted my watch—the Gardners were there, and
      See original Click to see original

      another one who has got fifteen months—I was in the habit of seeing Gardner—I buried his father-in-law.

      By the COURT. Between August 9th and the time the prisoner was taken, excepting the time he ran away, I could never find him in any of the places where I used to see him; he left all those places.

      WILLIAM KEMP (Policeman). I was present when Tadman identified the prisoner—he picked him out from ten or twelve others—he touched him and said, "That is the man."

      The prisoner's statement before the Magistrate: "I can produce plenty of witnesses to prove where I was that night."

      GUILTY .
    Central Criminal Court
    Central Criminal Court
    GEORGE ELLIOTT (30) , Robbery with violence, with Edward Gardner and other persons unknown, on Thomas Tadman, and stealing a watch, his property.
    Central Criminal Court
    Central Criminal Court
    GEORGE ELLIOTT (30) , Robbery with violence, with Edward Gardner and other persons unknown, on Thomas Tadman, and stealing a watch, his property.
    Occupation 1901 
    Undertaker 
    Census 1 Apr 1901  422 Cable Street, Shadwell, London Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Birthplace recorded as Wymondham.
    Misc
    • Tadman Funeral Directors was originally conceived from the love of horses of the great-great-grandfather of one of the current directors of the company, Tim Tadman.
      Thomas Tadman was a horse trader working from his home in Bale in Norfolk. He imported Friesian horses from Belgium, trained them to pull a glass hearse and then sold them to the Funeral Trade, mainly in the London Area. He, and his wife Dorcas, moved to Stepney, East London in 1849, and slowly built a thriving funeral business. After their deaths, their son Alfred William and his wife Annie continued to run the business successfully. He became a well known personality in the East End of London, not only as a Funeral Director, but also for his knowledge of Belgian Black Horses, which are the breed still used for the Horse Drawn Funerals.

      Source: www.http://actadman.co.uk/our-history/
    A&C Tadman
    A&C Tadman
    Source: http://actadman.co.uk/our-history/
    Died 23 Jun 1903  Dilham, Norfolk Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Cause: Cancer of liver Exhaustion 
    • Age recorded as 61.
    Person ID I6452  2. East End Ennevers
    Last Modified 7 Jun 2012 

    Father Thomas TADMAN,   Born:  1806/7, Hull, Yorkshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   Died:  18 Sep 1889, 57 Sutton Street, Shadwell, London Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years) 
    Mother Ann PARKINSON,   Born:  1805/6, Barton, Lincolnshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   Died:  1868, Stepney District, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 62 years) 
    Married 10 Feb 1829  Parish Church, St George, Bloomsbury, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Thomas Tadman & Ann Parkinson
    Thomas Tadman & Ann Parkinson
    Pallot's Marriage Index
    Family ID F1789  Family Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family (spouse) 1 Phobe SOUTHGATE,   Born:  Abt 1834, Great Snoring, Norfolk Find all individuals with events at this location,   Died:  19 Sep 1889, Stepney District, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 55 years) 
    Married 25 Aug 1862  Parish Church, St Mary, Lambeth, Surrey Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Thomas Tadman & Phoebe Southgate
    Thomas Tadman & Phoebe Southgate
    Parish register
    Family histories
    Marriages to a closely-related family member
    Marriages to a closely-related family member
    (including to a dead spouse's sibling and a dead sibling's spouse and some bigamous and other illegal marriages)
    Family ID F1804  Family Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family (spouse) 2 Dorcas Elvina LONG,   Born:  1858, Bale, Norfolk Find all individuals with events at this location,   Died:  1929, Walsingham District, Norfolk Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years) 
    Married 16 Jun 1892  Parish Church, St Peter, Stepney, London Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Dorcas's father not recorded.
    Children 
     1. Alfred William LONG,   Born:  9 Feb 1882, Great Snoring, Norfolk Find all individuals with events at this location,   Died:  1935, Stepney District, London Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 52 years)
     2. Ethel Susanna LONG,   Born:  15 May 1884, Great Snoring, Norfolk Find all individuals with events at this location,   Died:  1977, Redbridge District, London Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 92 years)
     3. Richard Charles LONG,   Born:  28 Dec 1887, Rollesby Workhouse, Rollesby, Norfolk Find all individuals with events at this location,   Died:  1951, King's Lynn District, Norfolk Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 63 years)
    Family histories
    A & C Tadman
    A & C Tadman
    Funeral Directors for five generations
    Marriages to a closely-related family member
    Marriages to a closely-related family member
    (including to a dead spouse's sibling and a dead sibling's spouse and some bigamous and other illegal marriages)
    Name changes in the Ennever and associated families
    Name changes in the Ennever and associated families
    Information about many of the name changes that have occurred.
    Family ID F1806  Family Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - Abt 1836 - Newington, Surrey Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChristened - 20 Aug 1837 - St John Horsleydown, Bermondsey, Surrey Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1 Jun 1841 - Kent Street, Newington, Surrey Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1 Apr 1851 - 276 Kent Street, Newington, Surrey Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCriminal - Convicted of larceny - 15 Jun 1857 - Newington, Surrey Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLiving - 25 Aug 1862 - Union Street, Lambeth, Surrey Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 25 Aug 1862 - Parish Church, St Mary, Lambeth, Surrey Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCriminal - Acquitted of uttering counterfeit coin - 13 Aug 1866 - Old Bailey, London Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1 Apr 1871 - 486 Cable Street, Shadwell, London Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCriminal - Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin - 10 Jul 1871 - Old Bailey, London Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1 Apr 1881 - 486 Cable Street, Shadwell, London Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLiving - 18 Sep 1889 - 422 Cable Street, Shadwell, London Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1 Apr 1891 - 422 Cable Street, Shadwell, London Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLiving - 16 Jun 1892 - St Peter, Stepney, London Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 16 Jun 1892 - Parish Church, St Peter, Stepney, London Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMisc - Edward Gardner charged with robbery with violence on Thomas Tadman - 13 Nov 1893 - Old Bailey, London Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMisc - George Elliott charged with violence and stealing - 2 Apr 1894 - Old Bailey, London Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMisc - 3 Apr 1894 - Central Criminal Court, London Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1 Apr 1901 - 422 Cable Street, Shadwell, London Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Cause: Cancer of liver Exhaustion - 23 Jun 1903 - Dilham, Norfolk Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Family histories
    Criminals and law-breakers in the Ennever and associated families
    Criminals and law-breakers in the Ennever and associated families
    A list of all known family law-breakers and their crimes


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