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Ennever & Enever family history & ancestry. Click here to return to the home page WJ Ennever (1869-1947). From the portrait by J Seymour R.A., exhibited in the Royal Academy.

Ferdinand BEACROFT

Ferdinand BEACROFT

Male 1890 - 1982  (91 years)

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  • Name Ferdinand BEACROFT 
    Born 19 Dec 1890  Shipley, Derbyshire Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Census 1 Apr 1891  92 Chain Row, Shipley, Derbyshire Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Census 1 Apr 1901  92 Chain Row, Shipley, Derbyshire Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Occupation 1911 
    Colliery Clerk 
    Census 1 Apr 1911  92 Chain Row, Shipley, Derbyshire Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Address also recorded as Marlpool, Derbyshire.
      B/place recorded as Marlpool.
    Ferdinand Beacroft & family
    Ferdinand Beacroft & family
    1911 census
    Occupation 1933  Shipley Colliery, Shipley, Derbyshire Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Commercial Manager 
    • Company Details
      Registered Office: 9, Clement's Lane, Lombard Street, E.C.4
      Address: Shipley, Derby
      Seams Worked: Deep Hard and Soft, Kilburn, Low Main
      Power Used: Electric. Voltage: 3,300 and 500
      Annual Output:  1,250,000 tons
      Class of Coal: Gas, Household, Manufacturing, Steam
      Source: 1933 Colliery Year Book and Coal Trades Directory. Published by The Louis Cassier Co. Ltd., from a copy held in the Scottish Mining Museum, Newtongrange, Midlothian

      Company Directors
      Chairman: Fry, John P., Sir, Bart., J.P.
      Managing Director: Claytor, Robert
      Directors: Calder, James C., Sir
       Claytor, Robert
       Fry, John P., Sir, Bart., J.P.
       Guinness, T. Loel E. B., M.P.
       Hamilton, G. C. Hans
       Mundy, Godfrey E. Miller, Major
      Commercial Manager: Beacroft, F., Shipley Collieries, Derby
      Secretary: King, R. W. P.
      Agent: Eaton, R. G.
      Source: 1933 Colliery Year Book and Coal Trades Directory. Published by The Louis Cassier Co. Ltd., from a copy held in the Scottish Mining Museum, Newtongrange, Midlothian
      Collieries/Mines Owned
      Employees
      Name of Mine  Locality  Manager  Under Above
       ground  ground
      Coppice, No. 1  Shipley  A. Grimes  719  136  
      Coppice, No. 2  Shipley  A. Grimes  —  —  
      Coppice, No. 3  Shipley  A. Grimes  958  154  
      Woodside, No. 1  Shipley  J. L. Westwood  —  —  
      Woodside, No. 2  Shipley  J. L. Westwood  644  135  
      Woodside, No. 3  Shipley  J. L. Westwood  634  144  
        
        2,955  569  
          3,524  
      http://www.dmm.org.uk/company/s1012.htm
        
    Living From 1940 to 1947  The Coppice, Ilkeston, Derbyshire Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Misc Biography 
    • The biography is contained within a series of papers written or collected by John W Rimington, one time Commercial and Finance Director of Shipley Collieries Ltd.

      Source: Derbyshire Records Office.

      Ferdinand Beacroft
       
      FB was a man who had a profound influence on my ownlife and development, which in the end bore some curious similarities to hisown early career, though our respective final destinations were to diverge intovery different ends; his business life being continuously in privateenterprise, while mine took a different path into 24 years work in the nationalised coal industry.
       
      Born in 1890, he was brought up in what one woulddescribe as the "old dispensation" at Shipley - the Squirearchy,which ended in 1920 with the death of Mr A.E.M.Mundy, and which soonthereafter, in 1922, entered into a completely different world - a Shipley ofbustling private enterprise under the aegis of a limited company, ShipleyCollieries Ltd., which was incorporated in November 1922 and commenced tradingon December 22nd 1922.
       
      His business life therefore spanned a period of about20 years in his "old dispensation", say 27 years under the newShipley regimes. while mine covered 25 years of the newer Shipley (192 -1947),followed by 24 years in the nationalised coal industry, there being thus anoverlap of  25 years spent by both of uswith Shipley Collieries Ltd.
       
      I first met him in December 1922, when I entered theShipley Estate Office for a short period of 6 months or so as office boy toH.W.P.Moulton, the last Estate Agent, who was selling off the Estate propertiesfor Major Godfrey Miller Mundy.
       
      I had heard a lot about FB before then from my father,who had known him from boyhood, and had always held him up to me as a shiningexample of what could be achieved by attention to duty and studying forqualification in some branch of work (in FB's case, accounting). My father'schief aim was to keep me away from a collier's job, he himself having sufferedbadly in 1920 from a severe accident at the coalface in Coppice pit.
       
      The height of my father's ambition at that time was toget me into a job in the Shipley office organisation by whatever meanspossible; which aim he had succeeded through his connection with a friend ofhis in Marlpool named Boam, Moulton's father-in-law. My actual first meetingwith FB came a day or two after my first day in my employment as office boywhen, on entering the Estate Office after lunch, I was surprised to find a manalready there, standing comfortably with his back to the fireplace.
       
      He asked me who I was; and I, of course, told him. Ihad never seen this man before, but I instantly divined that he was the man myfather had spoken so much about - "Ferdin" Beacroft. He asked me afew further questions which I do not now recall and then departed into theadjacent colliery offices, leaving me a somewhat puzzled boy, as may beimagined.
       
      Myimpression of him at that moment was of a man slightly below average height,with a fresh complexion and slightly thinning brown hair. But the leadingfeature about him was his piercing dark eyes, which gave him an air of intensealertness, which I was often enough to observe in the years to come. Also,although at that moment, he had not yet acquired the official authority he wasshortly to assume, it was clear enough to me, boy though I was, that here was aman to hold a position of command and authority. I think these characteristicsmust have been marked in him even a boy, as I well remember my father tellingme of a sage remark made about him by my grandfather, who regularly observedthe boy making his way to work past the"Lane End" farmhouse. "One day", said my grandfather,"that boy will be the top man at Shipley"- a prophetic utterance indeed.
       
      His first job with the colliery concern was as a boyat the Nutbrook weigh office. From there he was transferred to the GeneralOffice at the Field, as office boy. This would be in the time when C.S.Marshallwas the Commercial Manager and Alfred Smith the Cashier/Book-keeper of theconcern; and when the normal ladder of promotion was by way of dead men'sshoes. Somehow the spark of ambition must have arisen in the young Beacroft,who had no doubt observed the number of people above him on the ladder. How theidea came to him does not matter, but he grasped the fact that by studying fora professional qualification he would fit himself for a superior position. Inthose days the "Chartered Accountant" qualification was not open to ayoung man in his position, as it required articles[1];so he applied himself to one of the "outside" bodies that werespringing up to fill the gap in the field of qualification. It was, I think, the Central Associationof Accountants, and he set about passing their examinations through the mediumof a correspondence college, working in his spare time from home. He dulypassed the exams and could then produce a piece of paper in support of hisclaims had he required it. What he had done in fact was to mark himself out asthe one young man in the office hierarchy who had any real claim to fillinga superior position; and it was not long before he had a chance to exercise it,as Alfred Smith fell ill and FB was deputed to carry on the work of bookkeepingin his place. He took his chance with both hands and, applying all his nativeenergy to it, worked his way through all the problems of the job and came outon top. Many years later, in the only comment I ever heard him make on thisachievement, he mentioned that, on Alfred Smith's later return to work, theolder man had asked him only one question: how had FB got on with the Workman'sCoal Leading Account - which was rather a tricky assembly of miscellaneousitems arising from several sources, which then had to be carefully analysed andposted away to other appropriate accounts. It has to be appreciatedthat all this accounts work was in those days regarded as of highconfidentiality, not to say secrecy; but FB was able to say to Alfred that hehad mastered the problem. Alfred had nodded and never referred to the matteragain. The last bastion of his craft and prestige had been ferreted out andlaid open to other eyes.
       
      But FB had now carved out for himself a definiteunassailable place within the office hierarchy, and when Alfred Smith died, thetwo former sides of his job were separated, FB taking over the accounts side,while the purely cashiers and day-to-day control of the office staff was taken over by H.J.Nunn,a capable enough man of the old order, but without FB's proven qualificationfor hat could now be seen as the job of an accountant with its own field ofresponsibility; a field in which FB's passion for order and accuracy could befully exercised. He detested sloppy work of any description. The arrangementworked and this was the situation when I joined the organisation in March 1922.
       
      But FB's real chance did not yet come until theformation of the limited company in November 1922; and although I was not atthat moment a direct observer of events at the Field office (having just beentransferred to the Nutbrook weigh office) it does not take much imagination toreconstruct the events of 1922 onwards.
       
      Put shortly, FB, with his thorough knowledge of theold dispensation, together with his readiness for the new, found favour with Clayton the Managing Director of thenew Company - and he was installed as the Company's Accountant - the comingman, while the older, senior members of the staff made their minds up as towhether they stayed with the bustling new management or retired or left.A.T.Annibal [?] the then Commercial Manager, who had taken over fromC.S.Marshall, soon retired, but most of the office staff "stayed put"and things moved on largely a before, with FB now in position as a seniorofficial. Clayton brought in a new Sales Manager named L.S.J.Thomson, who wassupported by FB and did not stay long; and so FB became Commercial Manager,responsible for both Accounts and Sales, in unquestioned command of all theoffice staff.
       
      It would be in 1923 when H.J.Nunn, the cashier, leftthe company, having bought the business of a Loughborough coal merchant,H.J.Loader. By then, I had been transferred from The Nutbrook weigh office tothe Field general office as office boy to Mr H.E.A.Henderson. I well rememberbeing deputed to carry Nunn's leaving present, a chair over to his house, themiddle one in the terrace, in which we ourselves went to live many years later,in 1941.
       
      All was not to be plain sailing, however, in the earlyyears of the new company - the twenties - and FB felt the full weight of hisresponsibilities. He was furnished with a new assistant, an accountant/cashiernamed J.E.Baker, a Yorkshireman, who fitted in very well, thus enabling FB toconcentrate on the selling side, which he enjoyed most and began to develop.Clayton, for his part, was forcing forward the substantial capital expenditureprogramme, including the new sinking to the Kilburn seam at Coppice No 3 pit.The difficulties and problems of this period, including the great Miners'Strike of 1926 and the company's cash difficulties, which later bore hard on FBand Baker, are described in some detail in the main 1922-1954 narrative andneed not be repeated here. Suffice it to say that the Kilburn coal was reachedin late 1928 and the company entered the thirties on a brighter upward note.
       
      In 1933 the Shipley Group acquired the business andassets of the Manvers Colliery Company, our Ilkeston neighbours, who had runinto financial difficulties. The whole transaction was handled smoothly; nostaff difficulties arose, and as the Manvers and Lodge Collieries were workingin the same seams as Shipley, no sales difficulties were encountered, save inthe disposal of the mountain of stock that the Manvers people had accumulated,which was accomplished over a reasonable period of time.
       
      A much bigger problem arose in our entanglement withthe affairs of the Mitchell Main Colliery Company of Wombwell in Yorkshire,which again is discussed fully in the main narrative. As time went on, FB'sresponsibilities and interest in that company's affairs perforce grew greater.First, Robert Clayton died in 1941; then R.G.Eaton, FB's fellow director andlong term associate in the working of Shipley and Ilkeston Collieries died in1942 and FB assumed the sole Managing Directorship of all three companies,involving the great weight of the legacy of misjudgment and mismanagement atMitchell Main, which had followed from the Shipley Board's considerableinvestment in and support of Mitchells, into which they had been led by RobertClayton's own personal connection with the place. I know that FB had at onestage feared that the continual drain of financial losses at Mitchells mightbring Shipley to its knees. But he ploughed on resolutely throughout the waryears, until the Election of 1945 brought an entirely new factor into the wholemining industry - the nationalisation of the mines.
       
      This was indeed an unwelcome development for themineowners; but all they could do was to cooperate with the Government, whichwas intent upon change, so as to minimise damage to their own interests, to themines, and the whole industry in the welter of legislation that was to arise
       
      As to the Shipley Board, the Chairman, Sir John Fryand Major Mundy appeared to accept the situation without pleasure, but withequanimity; but both Guinness and Hans Hamilton were bitterly resentful andopposed to the nationalisation and could hardly believe that it was reallygoing to happen. It took all of FB's tact and knowledge to get them to realisethe inevitable: they kept on bringing forward impracticable - indeed ridiculous- notions into Board discussions on the subject.
       
      Anxieties then arose as to what was going to happen tothe directors generally and senior members of the staffs of the collieries. TheNCB commenced various series of meetings and interviews with senior people toseek out and appoint such as were willing and available to take up the keypositions in the new organisation they had sketched out for the control of thenationalised industry. FB was seen several times by the Chairman of the NCB,Lord Hyndley and various other Board members for positions on one or otherDivisional Board either as Sales Director or Deputy Chairman. I was seen by LionelLowe, the Board Finance member.
       
      Eventually, Westwood and I were appointed as seniorofficials of No 5 Area in the East Midlands Division; but in the end, FBdecided to stay with the Shipley Board in order to see them through thevaluation process, which in fact took up several years. He chose wisely. Inever thought he would have been happy in the circumscribed and rigid patternof the nationalised framework, having lived for so many years with the freedomof action he had enjoyed under private enterprise.
       
      Westwood and I, being younger, fitted into the newpattern easily, and both of us gained in authority and responsibility in thejobs to which we were appointed, he as the Area General Manager and I as AreaChief Accountant and we were both able to do good work there. He died suddenlyand most unexpectedly in 1951.
       
      But it is time that I drew together somecharacteristics of FB - in every way the best man I ever worked for or with.There seemed to be some natural unspoken bond between us, which of course foundgreater expression and trust as the years went by, from my boyhood days until Igained positions of seniority under both him and later with the NCB, when I couldspeak more freely and at greater ease with him.
       
      Hewas a man of the greatest integrity and, within his own field, at every stagehe radiated complete authority and one always felt safe with him. When he gavean instruction, one's only thought was to go out and do the job withoutquestion. His quickness of apprehension was remarkable, whatever the problemsput before him - before one was half way through explaining the problem hewould furnish the answer - invariably correct and practical. in the later yearswhen I was able to speak more freely with him, i once had the temerity to sayto him that, in that respect, he had been less than beneficial to me. He wasastounded, and required to know what I meant. I said "well, your grasp ofa question has been so quick that I was never able to learn and practise theart of deploying a logical argument through fro1me beginning to the end - ineffect, fully to make out a case; your answer always came out before I had gothalf way through the question". He was doubly astonished and we had a goodlaugh about it.
       
      But it is of course a fact that between wellacquainted associates there grows to be an economy of words, since every oneknows exactly what the other's every word means in any give situation; and akind of staccato style develops, which a third party can find difficulty infollowing.
       
      There was also one occasion between us such that, whenit was over, I found it endlessly amusing. It arose out of his regular walksaround the estate and colliery roads in which he took an endless delight as anold Shipley man. On a Monday morning one always had to be prepared to receivesome question about something he had observed over the weekend; I used to feela bit sorry for Stanley Hill, who finally after Wheldon's death graduated tothe task of keeping the estate looking respectable. Stanley would be faced onMondays with some query or assertion that this or that fence obviously neededattention or some other thing was suffering neglect.
       
      For my part the questions used mainly to concern whycertain wagons were in certain untoward places. William Cutts also came underenquiry in matters of surface management at the pits - FB could not standuntidiness or slipshod work anywhere.
       
      My problem arose while I was still quite a youngfellow, when one Monday morning I received a phone call from FB asking thedirect question (he always came straight to the point) "why a certaingroup of wagons were not at the point they should be at the washery awaitingloading?" I instantly perceived that I was on the horns of a dilemma: if Isaid this, I should catch it for some clear mistake; while if I said that, Iwas caught out on some other point, and there were only the two answersavailable. So I stood silent at my end of the phone, totally unable to make upmy mind which thing to say. After what seemed to be an interminable time, Iheard his voice say, somewhat sarcastically, "echo answers!" But Istill stood wordless, absolutely petrified by uncertainty. Then, after another interminableperiod of silence, I had the most peculiar feeling that the blood was risingfrom the nape of my neck up to the crown of my head; and when it reached thecrown, I suddenly had a feeling of intense relief and thought: "to hellwith him, I'm not going to speak, whatever"; and then I heard hisvoice again saying, "Well, John, you've beaten me" and then the soundof his receiver being put down. An oddity of this story lay in the fact that atno time thereafter did either of us ever refer to this incident and that over aperiod of nearly 20 years (until nationalisation) I always regarded the wholeincident as some kind of psychological freak; laughable enough later, butreplete with intensity at the time it occurred..
       
      This, however, was a peculiarity of our relationship -a great respect on my part for his personal qualities, which never ceased oreven faltered throughout his life; and on his part, a kind of regard forwhatever I had that appealed to him. I remember being surprised one time at hisconfidence in what he thought was my ability as he thought to"bottom" a problem. But it was merely a difference of approach; hehad, as I have said, this uncanny ability to cut straight and quickly to thenub and kernel of a question. My approach was the opposite: I always had toexamine the frame in which the picture was set and only then to get to thecentre by a sort of gradual encroachment inwards. I could never be happy byjust diving in towards the target.
       
      Heappreciated a new idea when he thought it good and sound, as witness his readyacceptance of Trevor Jones' suggestion that we should mechanise our office workto a sensible degree, which we did, and successfully with common-sense and thenecessary preparation work which is so essential.
       
      There is an old saying that "the shortest way isthe best way" and I have often reflected that the best appreciation of FBthat I ever heard was one made by Ernest Wheldon, our Chief Surveyor for manyyears at Shipley, whom I heard say "He is very keen, but very fair".A short but accurate verdict. In my experience he was always fair, knowing fullwell that arrangements that are merely dictatorial or one-sidedly authoritativewill sooner or later come to grief He seemed always to visualise what anintelligent third party would say and not drive a matter too far merely toachieve a victory. Curiously, I never heard him in action as chairman of ameeting, but have no doubt that this inherent feeling for fairness would havestood him in good stead in that matter also, although I have heard lesser menmake good chairmen.
       
      I would not have classed him as an original thinker.He was not an "ideas" man, who had a dozen ideas a week, only one ofwhich was of the slightest use. In every way he was a "middle of theroad" man, who preferred the tried and practical way of approach, althoughin some relatively minor matters he could spring a surprise by choosing, say,an unexpected route to a given destination when travelling by car.
       
      I myself have a favourite classification of businessmeninto (1) organisation builders; (2) organisation runners; and (3) organisationwreckers. In (1) I would place firmly Joseph Latham (later Sir Joseph) one timeDeputy Chairman of the NCB, who built up the Board's well founded FinanceDepartment; FB 1 would have placed in class (2) as a man who could take over anexisting organisation and run it successfully, adapting it only at need to meetchanged circumstances; and in (3) I would have placed Ronald Parker. These lastare the men who cannot or will not use the existing or laid down channels ofcommunication, preferring to work through preferences of a personal nature, sothat if one such doesn't like or cannot get on with, say, a departmentalmanager one uses his assistant or some other favourite; so that before long thedepartment becomes bemused, not knowing who is to do what, and only functionsthrough personal instructions from the wrecker, who himself has not got eitherthe guts or power to sack or transfer the accredited manager who is not up tothe job. Another instance of this wrecking tendency (with which I becamepersonally acquainted) was the case of a chairman, who, through sheerselfishness and vanity would have repeated financial exercises carried out onslightly different bases until a result emerged that satisfied his personalvanity or whim, so supporting his idea that he was right and everyone else waswrong (including his superiors) o the given point at issue. There are, ofcourse, variants o the general theme, such as poor choosy of the man for thejob; or those who fail to see that if a given job requires a man who can jump 3feet it is useless to choose two men each of whom can only jump 2 feet. Thelist is endless.
       
      When, in the course of time, I became an NCB man,either at Eastwood or in Scotland, and FB went to live in the South of England,we could meet less frequently. But it was always a delight to see him again onsome occasion when we both had some business meeting in London and would thenrepair to Bentleys (then still a family place) and have a dinner together,usually consisting of a plate of smoked salmon and some Blue Stilton,accompanied by a Hock or Moselle.
       
      Itwas always like a breath of fresh air to hear a voice of independentcommon-sense on matters of current affairs or on men of our commonacquaintance. One realised how regimented one was becoming or had become. Hehimself had been recommended by W.R.T.Whatmore, a senior partner in Peats, torepresent the interests of an American investor in the then electronics firm ofPlessey and had acquired a fair knowledge of their senior staff people - andindeed due to his complete independence and transparent trustworthiness, a kindof father-confessor to some of them in workaday difficulties they encountered.
       
      Before the Shipley Group's valuation work had beencompleted, he and Mrs Beacroft went first to live at a cottage on their sonBob's farm near Heathfield in Sussex; then to Ardingly, also in Sussex; then Ithink to Goring-on-Thames; then, I think, Mrs Beacroft died on a visit toanother farm of Bob's at Mapledurham, near the Thames. Then he had a spell athis daughter's house and finally ended his days in a residential home, still inthe South.
       
      Suchwas Ferdinand Beacroft, the best mentor and truest friend I ever had.

      [1] which would have to be paid for
    Ferdinand Beacroft
    Ferdinand Beacroft
    Biography. Courtesy Derbyshire Records Office. p1/7
    Ferdinand Beacroft
    Ferdinand Beacroft
    Biography. Courtesy Derbyshire Records Office. p2/7
    Ferdinand Beacroft
    Ferdinand Beacroft
    Biography. Courtesy Derbyshire Records Office. p3/7
    Ferdinand Beacroft
    Ferdinand Beacroft
    Biography. Courtesy Derbyshire Records Office. p4/7
    Ferdinand Beacroft
    Ferdinand Beacroft
    Biography. Courtesy Derbyshire Records Office. p5/7
    Ferdinand Beacroft
    Ferdinand Beacroft
    Biography. Courtesy Derbyshire Records Office. p6/7
    Ferdinand Beacroft
    Ferdinand Beacroft
    Biography. Courtesy Derbyshire Records Office. p7/7
    Occupation 1940  Shipley Colliery, Shipley, Derbyshire Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Director & Commercial Manager 
    • Company Details
      Registered Office: Shipley, Derby
      Seams Worked: Deep Hard and Soft, Kilburn, Low Main, Mickley
      Power Used: Electric. Voltage: 3,300 and 500
      Annual Output:  1,500,000 tons
      Class of Coal: Gas, Household, Manufacturing, Steam
      Source: 1940 Colliery Year Book and Coal Trades Directory. Published by The Louis Cassier Co. Ltd., from a copy held in the Scottish Mining Museum, Newtongrange, Midlothian

      Company Directors
      Chairman: Fry, John P., Sir, Bart., J.P.
      Directors: Beacroft, F.
       Claytor, Robert
       Fry, John P., Sir, Bart., J.P.
       Guinness, T. Loel E. B., M.P.
       Hamilton, G. C. Hans
       Mundy, Godfrey E. Miller, Major
      Commercial Manager: Beacroft, F., Shipley Collieries, Derby
      Sub-Agent: Westwood, J. L.
      Secretary: King, R. W. P.
      Agent: Eaton, R. G.
      Source: 1940 Colliery Year Book and Coal Trades Directory. Published by The Louis Cassier Co. Ltd., from a copy held in the Scottish Mining Museum, Newtongrange, Midlothian
      Collieries/Mines Owned
      Employees
      Name of Mine  Locality  Manager  Under Above
       ground  ground
      Coppice, No. 1  Shipley  S. S. Thornhill  644  160  
      Coppice, No. 2  Shipley  S. S. Thornhill  —  —  
      Coppice, No. 3  Shipley  S. S. Thornhill  704  162  
      Woodside, No. 1  Shipley  C. A. S. Moore  —  —  
      Woodside, No. 2  Shipley  C. A. S. Moore  417  114  
      Woodside, No. 3  Shipley  C. A. S. Moore  694  191  
        
        2,459  627  
          3,086  
      http://www.dmm.org.uk/company/s1012.htm
    Occupation 1947  Shipley Colliery, Shipley, Derbyshire Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Managing Director 
    • nb the coal industry was nationalised in 1947.

      Company Details
      Registered Office: Shipley, Derby
      Source: 1947 Colliery Year Book and Coal Trades Directory. Published by The Louis Cassier Co. Ltd., from a copy held in the Scottish Mining Museum, Newtongrange, Midlothian

      Company Directors
      Chairman: Fry, John P., Sir, Bart., J.P.
      Deputy Chairman: Mundy, Godfrey E. Miller, Major
      Managing Director: Beacroft, F.
      Directors: Beacroft, F.
       Fry, John P., Sir, Bart., J.P.
       Guinness, T. Loel E. B., M.P.
       Hamilton, G. C. Hans
       Mundy, Godfrey E. Miller, Major
      Commercial Manager: Rimington, J. W.
      Chief Agent: Westwood, J. L.
      Secretary: King, R. W. P.
      Agent: Smillie, J.
      Source: 1947 Colliery Year Book and Coal Trades Directory. Published by The Louis Cassier Co. Ltd., from a copy held in the Scottish Mining Museum, Newtongrange, Midlothian
      Collieries/Mines Owned
      Employees
      Name of Mine  Locality  Manager  Under Above
        ground  ground
      Coppice (a)    G. S. Milne  1,059  327  
      Woodside (b)    T. Wright  988  361  
        
       2,047 688  
          2,735  
    Ferdinand Beacroft (c1891-?)
    Ferdinand Beacroft (c1891-?)
    Times report on Shipley Colliery
    Ferdinand Beacroft (c1891-?)
    Ferdinand Beacroft (c1891-?)
    Times report on Shipley Colliery
    Died 1982  Henley District, Oxfordshire Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I8426  1. Essex Ennevers
    Last Modified 14 Sep 2011 

    Father Ferdinand BEECROFT,   Born:  1863, Cotmanhay, Ilkeston, Derbyshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   Died:  1897, Basford District, Nottinghamshire Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 34 years) 
    Mother Hannah KNIGHTON,   Born:  1865/6, Ilkeston, Derbyshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   Died:  Yes, date unknown 
    Married 1887  Basford District, Nottinghamshire Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F2410  Family Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family (spouse) Elizabeth FLETCHER,   Died:  Yes, date unknown 
    Married 1916  Basford District, Nottinghamshire Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. John Ferdinand BEACROFT,   Born:  1917, Basford District, Nottinghamshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   Died:  Yes, date unknown
     2. Edward A BEACROFT
     3. Joan M BEACROFT
     4. Robert H BEACROFT
    Family ID F8074  Family Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 19 Dec 1890 - Shipley, Derbyshire Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1 Apr 1891 - 92 Chain Row, Shipley, Derbyshire Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1 Apr 1901 - 92 Chain Row, Shipley, Derbyshire Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1 Apr 1911 - 92 Chain Row, Shipley, Derbyshire Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 1916 - Basford District, Nottinghamshire Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Commercial Manager - 1933 - Shipley Colliery, Shipley, Derbyshire Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLiving - From 1940 to 1947 - The Coppice, Ilkeston, Derbyshire Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Director & Commercial Manager - 1940 - Shipley Colliery, Shipley, Derbyshire Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Managing Director - 1947 - Shipley Colliery, Shipley, Derbyshire Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 1982 - Henley District, Oxfordshire Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photographs
    Ferdinand Beacroft
    Ferdinand Beacroft
    Ferdinand Beacroft
    Ferdinand Beacroft

    Family histories
    Well-known family members
    Well-known family members
    All family members who I have found featured in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography or its Australian equivalent, Who's Who 2008 or with an obituary in The Times.


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