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Ennever & Enever family history & ancestry. Click here to return to the home page WJ Ennever (1869-1947). From the portrait by J Seymour R.A., exhibited in the Royal Academy.

Parish Church, St George in the East, Middlesex



 


Note: pins may represent approximate locations


Tree: 2. East End Ennevers
Notes: St. George’s is, as everybody knows, the work of Nicholas Hawksmore. It is one of the three churches he built in the old parish of Stepney under the Act for Building Fifty New Churches, introduced by the Tory Government of 1710. The other two are St. Anne’s, Limehouse, and Christ Church, Spitalfields. These three enormous white temples, presented by the State to a population of seafarers, rope-makers, ship’s chandlers and silk-weavers, stood in a landscape of damp meadows and pigmy russet hamlets. Then, as now, th_e churches must have seemed too noble, too sacerdotal for their neighbourhoods. The parishioners, one · imagines, would readily have accepted snug galleried boxes like the churches at Deptford and Bermondsey, Rotherhithe and Woolwich, instead of accomplished and profound works of art. Hawksmore is not quite at home in the East End. Perhaps because of this, perhaps because he took architecture rather beyond the ken of the ordinary man, London has never accepted these proud, lonely churches among her great monuments. The strong element of fantasy (as strong and original as in Swift, Hawskmore’s nearest parallel in literature) has frightened the conventional critic. An absurd and demonstrably false theory that Hawksmore was a dullwitted offspring of Vanbrugh has misled the readers of text-books. And so when enemy assault tears out the vaults and columns of St. George’s, the fact is less noticed than the blasting of some indifferent ornament in one of the least masterly masterpieces of Sir Christopher Wren.
OpenStreetMap

Latitude: 51.5025444, Longitude: -0.0691444


Tree: 1. Essex Ennevers
Notes: St. George’s is, as everybody knows, the work of Nicholas Hawksmore. It is one of the three churches he built in the old parish of Stepney under the Act for Building Fifty New Churches, introduced by the Tory Government of 1710. The other two are St. Anne’s, Limehouse, and Christ Church, Spitalfields. These three enormous white temples, presented by the State to a population of seafarers, rope-makers, ship’s chandlers and silk-weavers, stood in a landscape of damp meadows and pigmy russet hamlets. Then, as now, th_e churches must have seemed too noble, too sacerdotal for their neighbourhoods. The parishioners, one · imagines, would readily have accepted snug galleried boxes like the churches at Deptford and Bermondsey, Rotherhithe and Woolwich, instead of accomplished and profound works of art. Hawksmore is not quite at home in the East End. Perhaps because of this, perhaps because he took architecture rather beyond the ken of the ordinary man, London has never accepted these proud, lonely churches among her great monuments. The strong element of fantasy (as strong and original as in Swift, Hawskmore’s nearest parallel in literature) has frightened the conventional critic. An absurd and demonstrably false theory that Hawksmore was a dullwitted offspring of Vanbrugh has misled the readers of text-books. And so when enemy assault tears out the vaults and columns of St. George’s, the fact is less noticed than the blasting of some indifferent ornament in one of the least masterly masterpieces of Sir Christopher Wren.
OpenStreetMap

Latitude: 51.5025444, Longitude: -0.0691444


Tree: 7. Essex Enevers (2)
Notes: St. George’s is, as everybody knows, the work of Nicholas Hawksmore. It is one of the three churches he built in the old parish of Stepney under the Act for Building Fifty New Churches, introduced by the Tory Government of 1710. The other two are St. Anne’s, Limehouse, and Christ Church, Spitalfields. These three enormous white temples, presented by the State to a population of seafarers, rope-makers, ship’s chandlers and silk-weavers, stood in a landscape of damp meadows and pigmy russet hamlets. Then, as now, th_e churches must have seemed too noble, too sacerdotal for their neighbourhoods. The parishioners, one · imagines, would readily have accepted snug galleried boxes like the churches at Deptford and Bermondsey, Rotherhithe and Woolwich, instead of accomplished and profound works of art. Hawksmore is not quite at home in the East End. Perhaps because of this, perhaps because he took architecture rather beyond the ken of the ordinary man, London has never accepted these proud, lonely churches among her great monuments. The strong element of fantasy (as strong and original as in Swift, Hawskmore’s nearest parallel in literature) has frightened the conventional critic. An absurd and demonstrably false theory that Hawksmore was a dullwitted offspring of Vanbrugh has misled the readers of text-books. And so when enemy assault tears out the vaults and columns of St. George’s, the fact is less noticed than the blasting of some indifferent ornament in one of the least masterly masterpieces of Sir Christopher Wren.
OpenStreetMap

Latitude: 51.5025444, Longitude: -0.0691444


Tree: 8. Essex Enevers (4)
OpenStreetMap

Latitude: 51.5025457, Longitude: -0.0691438